Question about Bernina Artista 180

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The stitch quality is lousy. The bobbin thread is loose and the seam can be pulled apart. I have had it cleaned, adjusted and checked out numerous times by two Bernina authorized dealers ever since I bought it new. I use Mettler or other high quality thread, change the needle more than I changed my children's diapers and nothing helps. Every time I sew I adjust the tension up to 6.5 to be able to sew at all. I'm convinced this machine is defective but no one listens to me.

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Check the tension spring in teh bobbin case
replace teh bobbin case
check for fluff or dirt between teh tension plates of teh tension unit - a piece of paper rubbed between them will help
take it to another dealer!

Posted on Apr 08, 2008

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I have a VX1250. I don't know how to regulate the tension.


There is two places to adjust thread tension: the top tension device controls the top thread tension and is usually a dial or knob with numbers on the front of the machine.

Then there is some form of tension device on the bobbin; in your case I believe the Brother has a removable bobbin case with a tension spring which holds the bobbin thread firmly: the tension spring can be adjusted with a screwdriver but once set, you shouldn't need to adjust this much, just alter the top tension slightly for different weights of fabric. So start by setting top tension dial to 4-5 and test stitch a seam. Use different coloured but the same type of thread top and bottom and take a look at the seam. You want to see a balanced even seam.

Here is a link to a great info site for this:
http://www.sewusa.com/Sewing_Machine_Repair/Thread_Tension_Settings.htm

If the bobbin thread is too loose, then you probably will need to finess the tension spring on the bobbin case and adjust this slightly. The best way to set the tension on the bobbin case is as follows. Load the bobbin into the bobbin case and pull the thread tail into the tension spring, then suspend the bobbin by holding the thread tail up in the air (the dangle test). You want it to be just tight enough to hold its own weight, but still able to release thread when you pull gently downwards on the bobbin case. If it isn't doing this then take your little screw driver and adjust the screw on the leaf tension spring by ONE QUARTER TURN ONLY. Lefty looser, Righter Tighter. Then test again, and adjust again until its right.

Now test stitch again and finess your top tension to get the seam even. Remember to change the needle for each new sewing project too; this will impact tension also.

Jan 04, 2012 | Brother Sewing Machines

Tip

Setting Sewing Machine Tensions


When you sew you want a nice sturdy seam, one that won't pull apart or leave gaps or cause puckering. To get this it's important to have the tensions set correctly. Many seamstresses get confused about how to set their tension. It's a fairly simple process once you understand a few basic things.

BASIC LAW OF TENSION to form the stitch: The UPPER thread tension changes the look on the UNDERSIDE of a seam while the BOBBIN tension, the bottom tension effects the appearance of the TOP SIDE of the seam. That is quite opposite of what most people think. Basically what you want is for the top and bobbin tensions to equal so that the stitch forms half way between the two.

If you can see threads from the bottom side of the stitch showing on the TOP side of the seam, like the graphic below, then either the BOBBIN tension is too loose or the TOP tension is too tight.

If there are loops on the bottom side of the seam, like the illustration below, then the TOP thread tension is too loose, or the BOBBIN tension is too tight. Typically the TOP tension is too loose.

If there is puckering on the top side then most likely the TOP tension is too tight, though it may also be the the BOBBIN tension is way too loose.

So how can we tell which it is? The best way its to begin by taking a scrap piece of the fabric you will be sewing on, or at least the same type of fabric, picking the widest zigzag stitch possible with a medium to long length of stitch and sew several inches. Now examine the seam remembering which is the top and which is the bottom. If it does not look identical on both sides then one of the tension settings is wrong. (it is also possible that the needle is the wrong type but for the moment let's assume it's the tension).

If there's a problem with the stitch you can use the above rules to figure out which tension is off. However, as the top and bottom tensions work together let's begin by going through a basic check-off list.

First examine the threading of the upper thread and make sure it is correctly following the path and isn't catching on something. This is really important when you think you've looked through everything and just can't 'see' the problem. Taking the time to go through these steps can save you a lot of pulled hair!

Next pull out the bobbin and examine it in it's case. Are the threads would around it evenly or are they all jumbled and crisscrossed? Jumbled up is a BAD thing. Try a different bobbin that is wound correctly. Now examine if the thread is coming out of the proper place, through the tension slot. Pull on the thread to see if there's total resistant. If so, something isn't right. But it can also be a problem if there is no resistance so let's now do this test.

Suspend the bobbin in it's case by the thread. Let it dangle there is space, still holding it by the thread as if it was a yoyo. It should dangle there with a little slipping, the length of thread between it and your fingers getting a bit longer. If it hits the floor there's no resistance! You have NO tension. That is BAD. Now, while still dangling it gently flick your wrist like you're holding a yoyo and wanting it to drop down a little bit, which is exactly what it should do if the tension is correct. If it doesn't release any thread at all, doesn't drop down a bit then the tension is too tight. Most bobbin tensions are adjusted by turning the little screw on the casing next to where the thread comes out. (Make sure that the bobbin turns in the case the right direction too which is the same direction of the slot!)

If the bobbin drops a lot it is too loose and you will need to tighten it a bit. Remember that a gentle flick should allow more thread to come out but not reel out. There should be some resistance.

Now that we have the bobbin correctly adjusted place it back in the machine and sew another test seam and examine it. By using the rules at the beginning of this tip determine if the upper tension is just right, too loose or too tight. Adjust the upper thread tension accordingly, first raising the pressure foot then turning the dial or however your machine adjusts tension. The higher the number the tighter the tension and vice-versa.

So that you know what the upper tension should feel like pull on the thread at a point BEFORE it goes through the needle first. Pulling after it goes through the needle puts a bit more tension on the thread and I want you to feel the tension before that point. If the tension is too tight and you pull on it after it goes through the needle it may break the needle if it's a small sized needle. You should feel some resistance. You shouldn't have to tug hard on it to pull more thread through but it also shouldn't reel out without any resistance. If the thread is breaking either the tension is very high or the thread is catching somewhere. Check the threading as well as look to see if the spool is turning freely on the spindle. Sometimes the thread will catch on the spool itself. When you buy a new spool of thread remember how the end was through a tiny slot on the side of one end? If that slot is on the bottom of the spool on the spindle it can sometimes catch the thread as it turns. Simply turn the spool upside down and re-thread the machine if needed.

Now once more do a test seam and examine it. Follow the above steps until the top and bottom of the zigzag are identical - perfect!
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on Jul 01, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I have the huskylock 905 and it is running great--but-- the seam easily spreads apart after sewing. I have adjusted all of the tensions in different areas and it looks great until you hold the fabric and...


The left needle thread tension is the problem if the seam can be pulled open. Check the threading and tension on this needle, you may find that the stitch looks okay on the top but on the underside the left needle thread is actually lying against the right needle stitching.

Check the left needle tension device is working, clean it according to the manual instructions, rethread and ensure it is set to the normal number (probably 5), then test again and see if its still happening. If so the tension device is probably faulting and will need a service.

Reading your description again, if the whole seam is pulling apart fully, then all the tensions are too loose. Either way, I'd take it to the Husqvarna dealer for a service, all machines benefit from one at least every 2 years.

May 05, 2011 | Husqvarna Huskylock Computerized 905

1 Answer

My Husqvarna started having problems with the bobbin. The thread from the bobbin side is a tangled mess when I stitch. The top looks fine, but the seam falls apart easily and the backside is all tangled....


My Husqvarna started having problems with the bobbin. The thread from the bobbin side is a tangled mess when I stitch. The top looks fine, but the seam falls apart easily and the backside is all tangled. I cleaned underneath the bobbin holder but it didn't help.

Oct 13, 2010 | Husqvarna Viking 1

1 Answer

Top stitche is to tight and bottom stitche is to loose


Meaning you have adjusted the tension for the top thread as well as the bobbin?

Use two distinct colors of thread - one for the top and one for the bottom.

Thread the machine with the presser foot up.

The two threads should meet in the middle of the stitch with neither obvious on the opposite side of the seam.

Set the top thread tension to 4 and adjust the bobbin as needed.

May 01, 2010 | Brother CS6000i Computerized Sewing...

1 Answer

Pfaff varimatic 6091 sew a rag quilt with jean and flannel,I can't get my tension right it seems to be funny on the bottom stitch,where shoulf the top tension be set at 4 1/2 ,when do I adjust the bobbin...


Hi! The bobbin tension rarely needs to be adjusted. First, make sure you're using the appropriate size needle and thread for your fabric (I'd probably use either a 'denim' needle or a universal size 14) and also that the upper thread and bobbin are threaded absolutely correctly. These can throw off the tension! Also, take the time to clean out the bobbin area. That can throw your stitch off also.

If the stitch on the bottom is loose, so that you see the top threads, then the top tension is too loose. If the top stitch is too loose and you see the bobbin threads on top, then the top tension is too tight.

It helps to thread the machine with different color thread on top and in the bobbin, and then stitch an inch or so on the same type of fabric as you're using in your quilt. Check the stitch. If you need to adjust the top tension, make sure the pressure foot is down! Adjust a little, stitch a few inches, and check again. Repeat until you don't see any (or very little) bobbin thread on the top or top thread on the bottom.

If you go through all these steps, and the bobbin thread is still loose (and you've tightened up the top tension), then there is a tiny little screw on the side of the bobbin case that you can use to adjust the bobbin tension. Turn the screw just a little bit (less than a quarter turn), stitch, check, etc. Once the bobbin tension is set, you shouldn't ever have to change it.

Let me know if this helps, ok?

Happy sewing!




Feb 10, 2010 | PfaFF Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Husqvarna viking, interlude 435...unable to solve tension problem


Sounds like the tension unit is at fault. First check the bobbin tension by removing the bobbin case. Use a half-full to 3/4 full bobbin. Be sure it is threaded through the bobbin case with thread hanging straight down with tension spring on top. Tie the stitch plate to the end of the thread. If the thread pulls the bobbin out, the bobbin tension is too loose. If it does not move when "jiggling" the bobbin, it is too tight (which is not likely based on your description). Small screw (through an open hole) on the side of the bobbin case adjusts the tension of the bobbin case. Left for loose and Right for tighter. Otherwise, contact local authorized Husqvarna Viking dealer for their assistance. You can find the closest dealer at the Husqvarna Viking website - http://www.husqvarnaviking.com/us Good luck.

Apr 13, 2009 | Husqvarna Viking 1

2 Answers

Underneath stitch bad


Sometimes even though the tension is at recommeded placement, you may find with various fabrics or threads, you have to adjust it. I would try to raise the tension just a bit. Try it a little at a time until you achieve a stitch you are happy with. If adjusting the tension does not correct the problem, double check your threading. If sure it is threaded properly, especially going through the tension assembly...check your thread. I have found that the thread you use can and often does create tension problems. Try changing the thread and see if the stitch quality improves.

Mar 21, 2009 | Bernina Virtuosa 150

1 Answer

Unable to adjust tension,


Sounds like the bobbin thread is not inside the tension on the bobbin case. This normally happens when the bobbin is upside down. Insert the bobbin and pull on the thread.The bobbin should turn counter clockwise.
sewman7

Jul 15, 2008 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

My seams pull apart


Sounds like a tension issue.

Check your tension units and thread guides are clean and free of lint....a rag moistened with methylated spirit (denatured, surgical etc) run between the disks will help.

Normal factory tension setting = 3 for all dials although resetting this style of tension unit is, frankly, awkward, so if it ends up being other than 3, don't worry too much, just write it down somewhere handy.

Start with all at tension 3 and try using 4 different colours of thread and sew a scrap to see the balance of the tensions to more easily locate any that are loose.

Ideally, the 2 needle threads should appear as secure dots not at all "loopy", while the looper threads should meet neatly at the edge and be a firm join without pulling at the edge on one side or the other.

Get the needle threads right first, then small adjustments to balance the looper threads....after a few adjustments you will probably have it back to normal.

If you want any more help with this, just drop a line through the "Contact Us" page at www.bargainbox.com.au

Feb 18, 2008 | Janome MyLock 634D Mechanical Sewing...

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