Question about Abit AW9D-MAX Motherboard

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I can't install Windows, (7 or XP) I've tried various drives and each time it goes through the copying process but it sticks at the starting windows point

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  • brian134 May 17, 2010

    the drive is good, an old reliavle ide that I've installed XP and Win 7 on another board with no issues.. It would appear to be the board is not recognising the drice as a boot drive. I know that these boards had issues with Kentsfield chips beofre revision 15, but my board is a rev 15 so I'm not sure what the issue is, I could change the cpu, but I'm not convinced that is the issue as the log message clearly stops at disk.sys drivers. However I've tried 2 SSDs, a SATA and an IDE drive and all have failed at the hard drive boot part of the install.

    I have ordered a floppy drive to allow me to re-flash the bios with the latest version to see if that makes any difference, but I also have a Pentium D 960 I can use to try and eliminate CPU incompatabilities.

  • brian134 May 17, 2010

    yes its legit DVD Windows 7 Ultimate, also the XP version is legit from my last PC, niether installed on the abit board. I tested the win7 on another PC to make sure it installed ok (it did).
    I'm not in RAID mode. I did try to set up a pair of SSD's in RAID but when that didn't work (no floppy to supply drivers) I then tried a single in SATA auto mode, when that didn't work I tried a SATA then an IDE drive.
    Every combo I've tried has failed at the starting windows phase.

    Since it fails to also install XP I am leaning towards the board being faulty in some way, what do you think?

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I'd definately be using a KNOWN good drive or better yet a new one to see if the problem stops. When I say good I mean one that's been through a software confirmation,like tuff-test pro(only available to technicians or pirates,lol). You can also try a different cable,a different cd or dvd drive & if your copy of either windows is a burnt one(like no-one's done that),re-burn it at the slowest rate possible(4x is good) & try again. It's definately a hard drive issue of sorts if your using legit cd or dvd from microsoft.

Posted on May 17, 2010

  • Pete MacSparran
    Pete MacSparran May 17, 2010

    You still didn't say if you're trying to use a burned copy or legit media,it makes a difference. There's another thing,check in bios to see what you have raid set for. If you try to install while in raid mode & don't install the raid drivers you will have this. but sounds like you know,so thanks for posting!

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I'm trying to move files from old computer to new computer.


The easiest way is to use an USB memory stick, plug this USB memory stick into the XP computer and copy the files from the XP computer to the USB memory stick, then remove the USB memory stick and plug it into the Windows 7 computer and copy the files from the USB memory stick to the Windows 7 computer.

Jul 14, 2012 | Computers & Internet

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Installing Windows XP using a USB Flash drive.


Removable flash memory sticks are pretty much one of the most handy little pieces of technology to come along in the last couple of years. They come in various shapes and their storage size can range from a measly 128 MB to a whopping 32 GB. And you're not restricted by what you are able to put onto these devices either. Which got me thinking today. I am regularly installing fresh copies of Windows onto new built PCs, so I look for any way to increase the speed at which my work gets done without compromising quality, of course.<br /> So I thought, with the speed of flash drives today, it could be possible to install Windows XP onto those PCs in a much faster time than with optical media (CD/DVD). Plus with all the motherboards I use, I always make sure that the motherboards support booting from USB as it's a very handy feature. So I decided to look into the various guides that can be found on the Internet. Originally meant for the EEEPC, I found a guide that I was able to understand. Because of the way it was written it took me longer than 10 minutes to understand the whole procedure and I'm sure the average geek would be completely confused before they had reached the second line, simply because of the total lack of explanation on the part of the guide's creator for those who do not usually do this kind of thing.<br /> Anyway, as with all guides, you have to realize that there is a certain amount of risk involved with the procedures I am about to give you details for and that you use this guide at your own risk; I will not be held accountable for any damages done to your hardware if something should go wrong. It will involve the use of the command prompt and it has the possibility of damaging your flash drive. Although I believe that the chances of that happening are quite slim, there is always the possibility, so I thought I would warn you before you decide if you're going to use my guide. Now with the pleasantries out of the way, let's get down to business. There is some preparation needed before we can start this procedure. First off you need to make sure you have the following available to you:<br /> 1. An unmodified, legal copy of Windows XP Home or XP Professional<br />2. USB memory stick (2 GB recommended - 1 GB minimum)<br />3. A motherboard that is capable of booting from a USB drive (check your motherboard manual if not sure)<br /> As long as you have all three points above met, then you are ready to start. Just so you know, in this process your USB flash drive will be formatted, so do not use a USB that contains data vital to you. As for a motherboard that is capable of booting from a USB drive, most modern motherboards offer this as a standard feature. If your motherboard is less than two years old, chances are that the motherboard you have supports this feature.<br /> Okay, now we have made sure that your computer is capable of installing XP from a USB disk. The next thing we need to do is to download and extract three tools that are going to help us in this procedure. You can find download links to these files below:<br /> 1. USB_Prep8<br />2. PEtoUSB<br />3. Bootsect <br /> I suggest you download these files directly to the root of your hard drive. In other words save them to a folder on the same drive that contains your operating system - for most people this will be the C: drive. Once they are all downloaded, go ahead and extract PEtoUSB and USB_Prep8 to separate folders. Once this is done you should take the contents of the PEtoUSB folder and copy them into the USB_Prep8 folder. Once this is done, you should go back to the root of your drive and extract Bootsect to the root of the drive (program files and Windows folder is stored in this area). We do not need to worry about the Bootsect program for now, however that is simply preparation for later. And as another matter of preparation I suggest you insert your Windows XP CD, create a folder on the root of your drive, name it XP, and then copy the contents of your Windows XP CD into that folder as you will need these files soon.<br /> <br /> Okay, now that all the preparation is out of the way, we'll start the process. It will take on average about 20-25 minutes to complete this process depending, of course, on the speed of your PC and of the USB stick you are going to be using. I must warn you now that you should NOT close any of the windows generated by the programs I am showing you how to use until you reach the point in this guide when I tell you to do so. This is quite important because, if you happen to close any of the following windows, it is possible that you can screw up the procedure and you will have to start again. With that out of the way, as long as you follow the instructions below, everything will run smoothly.<br /> 1. Go into the folder named USB_Prep8 and double-click the following: (usb_prep8.cmd)<br />2. Make sure you select the newly created command prompt window and click any key to continue<br />3. A new program is started (PeToUSB). Do not change any of the settings; just click start and let it run<br />4. Once PeToUSB is finished, DO NOT CLOSE any of the windows the program created<br />5. Go to your start menu and click run if you're using the classic start menu<br />6. Enter the following command into your run window: (CMD)]<br />7. Once you have run that command, a new window will appear with the words command prompt<br />8. Provided that you have used the file setup I suggested, input the following: ( cd \bootsect )<br />9. Type in the following: ( bootsect /nt52 :R ) Replace R with the drive letter of your USB drive<br />10. You will see the message (Bootcode was successfully updated on targeted volume) if it worked right<br />11. You may NOW close all the windows except for the window that was created when you ran USB_Prep8<br />12. Providing you closed all the right windows, the USB_Prep8 Window will now contain seven options<br />13. Press 1 on your keyboard - this will bring up a window. Locate your XP folder and highlight it. Click OK<br />14. Press 2 on your keyboard - the program will ask for a unused drive letter (example: T or Z)<br />15. Press 3 on your keyboard - the program will ask for your USB Stick drive letter; enter it now.<br />16. Press 4 on your keyboard to start the USB_Prep8 process<br />17. The program will ask you if it is OK to format a drive contained in the letter you gave in #14; click yes<br />18. The program will start to copy the needed files; be patient<br />19. The program will then ask you if you wish to copy these files to the USB stick; click yes.<br />20. Finally, once it has finished copying the files, it will ask you if you want to make the stick the preferred boot drive. Click yes, after which it will ask if you wish to un-mount the USB stick. Click yes<br /> And that's all there is to it. The USB flash drive is now ready to install XP to any hardware that is supported by the Windows XP CD. However there are some minor differences to installing Windows XP this way than if you would with an optical drive, which I am going to go into. Of course, as I have said before, the speed at which Windows XP installs is MUCH faster when installing using a USB stick than if you were using an optical drive (CD/DVD). But the speed comes at the price of you needing to pay a little more attention to the install itself. Now from this point on, I am going to assume that your motherboard does in fact support booting from USB and that you have gone into your BIOS and have set the USB flash drive as the first drive to be booted from (make sure the flash drive is connected before you turn power on - it helps). I cannot give a generic answer to where that option is in your BIOS; I suggest you look up in your motherboard's documentation.<br /> Providing it boots from the USB flash drive, you will now be shown two options. One with the words GUI and one with the words Text Mode. Choose the Text Mode option first. Now you will see what you normally would see during a CD install of XP. Just follow the on-screen instructions as always. One note is that, if you need to create a new partition for your new Windows XP installation, once the partition is fully formatted, instantly turn off the PC as the install will need to be restarted so the flash drive can recognize the layout of your partitions correctly. Follow the instructions below:<br /> 1. Create a new partition and format it as normal<br />2. Once the partition is formatted, restart your PC and when the options come up again choose Text Mode<br />3. Highlight the newly formatted partition, press enter, move down to make no changes, and press enter<br /> Okay, now after that all goes through and the PC restarts, simply chose the GUI option on the menu and let the Windows XP install go along as it would normally do. I must advise that you DO NOT REMOVE the USB stick until you're actually past the setup stage. Once you have just booted into Windows XP for the first time, you can go ahead and remove the USB stick. Congratulations! You have just installed Windows XP without the need for a CD/DVD drive.<br /> <ul> <li>The benefits of installing from USB are plentiful and, providing you take the time to follow the instructions above, you need never worry about scratching your Windows XP CD again. I hope that the time I spent writing this guide will help you all to decrease the amount of time you spend having to install Windows XP when you have to. Peace!<br /></li></ul>

on Dec 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





cf85f95.jpg


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Windows 7 not installing in Hp XW4100 workstation


Sounds like you need to format the hard drive then try a new install

Jun 21, 2012 | HP Workstation Xw4100 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Windows xp is not starting


Windows XP is a fairly stable and secure operating system, but errors and other problems will occur from time to time. Unfortunately, some of these errors can damage or corrupt important system files and can lead to Windows XP not booting up correctly. You can repair your Windows XP installation using a process known as a "repair install," overwriting the damaged system files with new versions from your Windows XP installation disc. The repair install process takes approximately one hour, though a large portion of this time will not require any input from you.

1,Start your computer and place the Windows XP installation disc in the drive. If the computer is crashing upon attempting to boot, allow it to restart; otherwise, reboot the computer manually.
2.Press a key to boot from the Windows XP CD if prompted to do so when the computer attempts to boot again. If you are not prompted to boot from the CD, restart the computer again and press the indicated key on the initial BIOS screen to access the "Boot Order" or "Boot Sequence" menu. Select the CD or DVD drive containing the Windows XP installation CD, then press a key when prompted to boot from the disc.
3.Press the "Enter" key on the initial Windows XP welcome screen and press "Enter" again to begin setting up Windows XP. Do not press the key indicated to launch the "Recovery Console," as the Windows XP recovery console is not used to repair corrupted XP installations.
4.Accept the user agreement and wait while the setup program scans your hard drive.
5.Press the "R" key when the Windows XP setup program lists the installed version of XP that it detected to begin the repair installation. If you have more than one version of Windows XP installed, make sure that the proper version is listed before pressing "R."
6.Wait while the Windows XP setup program copies files to your hard drive and begins the installation process. The installation will take 45 minutes or longer, depending on the speed of your computer, during which time all of the Windows XP system files will be overwritten.
7.Confirm your user information as well as the date and time settings on your computer, and enter your Windows XP product key when prompted. Allow the operating system to connect to the Microsoft authentication servers to activate itself.
8.Reinstall any hardware drivers and XP Service Packs that you had previously installed, as your copy of Windows XP will have reverted to the basic installation you had when it was first installed.

I hope you find it very helpful.

Aug 25, 2011 | Gateway Computers & Internet

Tip

Installing Windows from flash drive-part II


Follow the next steps:
1. This step is mandatory. Through all the following process do not close the application. Close them if specified;
2. Create a folder and copy the 3 archives from above in that folder. (it is preferably to be close to the root; e.g. c:\XP USB);
3. Extract the content of USB_prep8.zip and PeToUSB.zip archives to the folder you just created;
4. Copy PeToUSB exe file to USB_prep8 folder
5. Enter the USB_prep8 folder, look for the usb_prep8.cmd and run it;
6. A black and ugly window will pop up. Press any key to continue. Here is the window that will pop up:
a062832.jpg
7. The result is the opening of the PetoUSB application:
49c5d08.jpg
8. All the settings are made. You only have to press Start. The application will format the USB stick and made it bootable. After completing the process do not close the application;
9. Extract the content of bootsect.zip archive;
10. Open the Command prompt (CMD). To enter the cmd, enter the Start menu- Run- type cmd. Or press Win key + R to open the Run window;
11. In the console use the CD command (Change Directory). Go to the folder that contains bootsect.exe file. If you followed step 1 the command is much more simple: c:\XP USB\bootsect;
12. Now you are in the specified folder. Type “bootsect.exe /nt52 I:”, where I: is the drive letter of the USB stick. Open a Windows Explorer or My Computer and check the drive letter of your USB flash and replace the “I:” letter with your drive letter. If it's not working close the window where you checked the letter of the drive.
af0fc89.jpg13. The result will be the update of Fat file system necessary for the boot from the USB stick. Now you finally transformed the USB stick into a Bootable USB Stick. Now you can close the following window and PeToUSB application.
9e151ee.jpg14. You will have in front of your eyes the following windows. If not press Enter. After the option list appeared, choose the following in the order:
a) Choose option no. 1 than browse the installation CD of Windows
b) Option 2- pick an unallocated drive letter. For example you can pick T (it is unlikely to be already chosen)
c) Option 3- pick the letter assigned for your USB Stick (in my case I)
d) Option 4 starts the process. When asked if you want to format the drive choose”Yes”, than “Press any key to continue”. The process needs some more confirmations, so stay close to your computer. It takes 10-15 minutes. It depends on transfer rate of the flash drive and the speed of the optical drive.
dc74600.jpg15. The worse passed. Now you have to confirm the deactivation of the temporary drive T: and to close all the windows. The XP USB stick is ready for use. You just have to install the operating system on your desktop or laptop PC

Now here are the steps for installing Windows from your fresh USB Boot Stick.
· Plug in the flash drive
· Check the Boot Order from the Setup(Bios) and set the Removable drive as first and the Hard Disk as second.
· Even so, there are cases when you have to enter the Boot Menu as soon you turn on your computer. (for EEE PC is ESC, for Toshiba is F12). From now on select Removable Drive or USB and the proper device.
· You will see that the menu is slightly different from the classic Windows XP installation menu, but it is not complicated.
· Pick option 1: “TXT Mode Setup Windows XP...”.Now the first part of the installation process is completed, the one in text mode. After the file copying process completes, the computer restarts, but you have to boot again from your Bootable USB flash drive. Now you have to choose option 2: “GUI Mode Setup Windows XP...”. From now on until the final steps of the installation process you have to choose Option 2.
And this is it



on Apr 16, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Install Windows From Usb Drive


Windows 7 can run on machines with lower specs than required for Windows Vista, and many users are actually finding it runs better than Windows XP on lower spec machines. It’s also ideal to run on newer netbook machines, but unfortunately many of these do not include a DVD drive so how do you install windows 7 on a machine without a DVD drive?
I spent yesterday researching this exact problem and I managed to install Windows 7 on my LG X110 netbook in around 20 minutes using a 4GB USB Drive. Setting up the USB drive to install Windows 7 was fairly easy in the end, and the installation was quicker than a DVD drive, so this method is perfect if you want to install Windows 7 quickly on several machines.
How To Install Windows 7 From A USB Drive
  1. Find a standard 4GB USB Drive and plug it into your machine
  2. Click Start in your enter ‘cmd’ in the run field. Once cmd is open type in ‘diskpart’ and a new window will open
  3. In the new diskpart window type:
  • ‘list disk’ : This lists all the disk drives attached to your machine
  • Look for your USB drive and note the number and then type: ’select disk #’, where ‘#’ is your USB disk number
  • then type ‘clean’
  • then type ‘create partition primary’
  • then ’select partition 1′
  • then ‘active’
  • then ‘format fs=fat32 quick’


Once you’ve finished these steps you then need to copy your Windows 7 files to the USB. To do this you have to mount your Windows 7 ISO as a virtual DVD. Doing this is easy:
  1. Install MagicDisk (free)
  2. once installed, right-click on MagicDisk in your system tray click on ‘Virtual CD/DVD-Rom’, select your DVD drive
  3. then ‘Mount’ and in the dialog window that opens up, select your Windows 7 ISO
  4. Now in windows Explorer, click on your DVD drive and you should see all the Windows 7 Files. All you have to do now is copy and paste all the files to your USB key and you have a Windows 7 USB Installation Stick!
  5. Install the stick in the PC you want to install Windows 7 on and boot up. Remember to change your bios to allow booting from USB
If you follow the steps above then you should have no problems installing Windows 7 from a USB key

on Dec 23, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I've got a 2 TB WD Elements external hard drive, and suddenly, no computer wants to recognize it when I plug it in. It is just rejected by any pc i've tried (3 laptops so far...) and I've a...


Is the PC you've used before is the operating system is windows Xp? If you've using windows Xp before then you've plug it in a windows 7 Operating system, it means your hard disc have no problem the operating system of your PC is different than before. Try to plug it in a windows Xp operating system then recover it in there then format it in a windows 7 operating system then, the windows Xp and windows 7 try to make a network place in the connection then share the hard disc files that you've recovered then copy and paste it in the newly format hard drive that formated in a windows 7 operating system.

Jul 21, 2011 | Western Digital Elements 2 TB USB 2.0...

2 Answers

I have want to setup Windows xp and windows 7 together .Meaning when start up computer have : Windows xp Windows 7 I try to setup two windows ,but i setup windows xp lost windows 7 and setup windows 7...


Not sure what you have done so far. You need to divide your hard drive into two sections. Install XP first on to one section. Then use a program to manage your computer start up, the one I use is called Easy BCD this is a free program and works great. Once you cut your hard drive and install XP make a copy of your start up partition. Install the Easy BCD program and make a back up again. Then Install Win 7. Then on the Win7 side install the Easy BDC program and set up the menu choices. I run a 3 way boot with XP and Ubuntu. Hope this helps Fix Ya up.

Jul 09, 2011 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

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