Question about Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

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My son has condensate building up in his flue and running down into the furnace. It is a 2 stage furnace. The contractor who installed it blames it on the chimney. Is that likely?

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  • Anonymous Mar 30, 2014

    flue kit head will not fit into chimney head

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It is for sure a venting issue, depending on where you are located, it sounds like the local building code inspector was not involved for an inspecton of the furnace replacement. When the flue condensates like that, it is usually because the flue is the wrong size, usually to big,or it is dumped directly into a masonary chimney, and the chimney was not lined to the top.
I hope this answers your questions, please rate me and let me know if I can help further.
Sicerely,
Paul Gibson

Posted on May 13, 2010

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Furnace has water under it, why? Its a Dayton gas furnace.


There are several questions that need to be answered about what type of system you have, but i found this posting that may help:
As your gas furnace runs, is there water leaking at the base? Is the furnace's air filter wet, too?There are a few things that could be happening here. But if you have a high-efficiency furnace, here's the most common cause: a condensation leak.
We'll explain why a furnace creates condensation, and what's causing it to leak out of your furnace.
Note: You'll know if you have a high-efficiency furnace if:
  • The yellow energy guide tag says your furnace's efficiency is 90% or higher AFUE.
  • The vent/flue pipe is white PVC as opposed to metal.
Why a high-efficiency furnace creates condensation
How in the heck does a high efficiency furnace create condensation/water anyway?
It's all about how the furnace extracts heat from combustion gases.
A lower-efficiency furnace extracts some heat from combustion gases and then quickly vents them out the flue pipe.
But a high-efficiency furnace, to extract more heat, has 2 heat exchangers. These allow the furnace to extract heat from the gases for a longer period of time. This causes the combustion gases to cool and then condense.
That condensation then exits out your home through a drain. But if that water is pooling around the furnace, there's a problem preventing it from draining properly.
Causes of a condensation leak around a high-efficiency furnace
  • Clogged condensation tubing
  • Clogged condensation drain
  • Breaks in the condensation line
  • Issues with the condensate pump (if you have one)
You'll need a furnace technician to diagnose which of these is the issue and then fix it.
Other causes of leaking water around a furnace
If you have a conventional, standard-efficiency furnace...then its flue pipe may be incorrectly sized.
If you have a whole-house humidifier connected to the furnace...there may be an issue which is causing the humidifier to leak into your furnace. Your humidifier should be getting annual maintenance from a professional to prevent this.

Dec 13, 2016 | Dayton Heating & Cooling

Tip

2 Stage Furnaces More Comfort and Save Money


Two stage hot air furnaces can save you money and make your high efficiency furnace even better. With your furnace running at low fire instead of cranking up to the highest heating output in mild weather you can be more comfortable while saving money.

Many people think that they are getting the best they can get by buying a high efficiency single stage furnace. What they often don’t realize is that they could do better yet and for a few dollars more have a high efficiency 2 stage furnace that could keep them much more comfortable.


There are 2 stage hot air furnaces that are now available that will only run at half fire if the full fire is not needed. With a two stage furnace in mild weather when only a little bit of heat is needed, the furnace will have longer run times on low fire. This will keep you room temperatures from getting too hot before the thermostat reacts and shuts the furnace off again. This will help to keep your temperatures from overshooting the set point and help to keep your home much more comfortable.

Many of these two stage furnaces also have variable speed blowers that run at a lower speed when heating on low fire. This will also help to save money on your electric bill, because these blowers use very little electric when running at these low speeds. Air noise from the blower running at a high speed is also reduced.

If you are thinking of replacing or installing a hot air furnace, make sure that you ask your contractor to give you a price on installing a two stage furnace. The price difference probably will not be much higher than a high efficiency single stage furnace. However the comfort of the two stage furnace coupled with the electric savings will make the extra money well worth it.

on Dec 14, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Flue gas condensation


The condensation will destroy your heat exchanger and should be dealt with immediately. If you have a 90% efficiency or better (condensing furnace), check the pvc drainage plumbing for a clog. Less than 90% would indicate the furnace isn't burning hot enough, and in that case you should call a qualified technician to at least inspect the heat exchanger and the flame. The condensate is very acidic, and in time eat through the metal of the heat exchanger

Dec 10, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My high efficiency furnace has water (possibly condensation) running down the air intake pvc pipe into the furnace and all over the burner, gas valve, and wiring.


First, check the drainline from the furnace. You have a 90% gas fired furnace. Where 80% furnace has 1 heat exchanger, yours has 2 heat exchangers. And the second heat exchanger will cool the exhaust enough, that it ends up below the dew point, and your furnace outlet/exhaust will condensate. This drain is probably stopped up. Now, I've installed and service many of these systems and I've only seen the piping at the roof you described once. And that was when the roofers replaced the roof, damaged the furnace flue pipe, and tried to repair it themselves. Normally, and this may not apply to yours, we tie in the exhaust/supply lines about 2-3 ft. above the furnace. Then 1 pipe goes through the roof. Thus 1 pipe is a kit that has an inner liner & outer pipe(2 pipes in 1). Now I'm not sure if this is a problem or normal for your system, but it may be worth looking into. You should be able to find it in the installation manual, or call a local parts house that sells your brand, or as your tech. And if it's just your drain, forget all about the piping I mentioned. Hope this helps!

Mar 08, 2017 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Just replaced pressure switch on intertherm m1mb gas furnace but still codes "pressure switch open"


CHECK FLUE FOR OBSTUCTIONS AS WELL AS COMBUSTION AIR INTAKE FIRST. THEN CHECK TO SEE IF THE FURNACE DRAIN IS OPEN AND NOT CLOGGED [ONLY IF YOUR FURNACE IS A CONDENSATING HIGH EFFICIENCY MODEL, typically the flue pipe will be 2 or 3 inch pvc pipe] over the years more often than not, it is an obstruction or poor drainage which will not prove the pressure switch to allow the burner to ignite. in rare cases the furnace control board could be bad as well.TRY DISCONNECTING FLUE AND COMB. AIR AT FURNACE JUST TO SEE IF FURNACE WILL IGNITE. HOPE THIS HELPS!!!!!!

Oct 20, 2011 | Intertherm P3RA-048K Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Colman mobile home gas furnace to use in my garage/shop


generally speaking a sealed combustion system is inherently more safe than a system that draws it's combustion air from it's ambient location. however, it cannot be considered 100% safe in a potentially hazardous location. The actual system that would be used in a "code compliant" installation would be a 100% outside air unit.
That being said, you can install this in a garage, the vent that you are referring to (if it is a standard mobile home system) is generally directly above the unit and usually no longer than about five feet. It also requires a listed and labeled termination "cap" If you install 90 degree angles or extend the vent too far you will have issues with condensation in the piping that will cause the pipe/ heat exchanger to fail prematurely.
If the system is a 90+ efficeint unit then the PVC venting is generally allowed to be about 30 feet long, with a 1/4 inch per foot pitch back to the unit for condensation, also the general mfg. instructions allow either 2- 90 degree or 4 45 degree fittings in the line. hope this helps

Nov 06, 2009 | Coleman Propane Forced Air Heater...

2 Answers

I'm considering installing a Goodman LP Gas Furnace:sizing? Ops?


Gerge, if you go to website www.energycodes.gov
you can do a heat load calc yourself. Basically, you figure out the sizes of walls, total area of glass. total doors to outside, ceiling area and types of building materials used. It is pretty easy and then you will know for sure. The contractor should be suppling you with one but if not use this, it is free!

Nov 03, 2009 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

2 Answers

We have a old house and the gas hot water heater and the central heating unit is vented out an old chimney and the heater is building up condinsation, how do i vent the heating unit out the wall, unstead...


actually if you vent your furnace by code, it would probably be cheaper to have a chimney liner installed up the old masonry chimney. you may be able to buy a kit and do this yourself. any time a new furnace with a draft inducer on it is installed, it must be vented into the proper flu material. if it was vented into your chimney, it may not have be installed by code for your area. you may talk to the instaled if they are still available and maybe that can return and do it correctly. if you leave this vented into your masonry chimney, the acid content of the exhaust will ruin the chimney. a liner will also get rid of the water problem you have.

Jan 26, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Carrier air handler tonnage?


That is a fairly large difference. It is usually ok to have the inside evap. coil and blower up to 1 ton larger than the outside condenser. That will make the unit slightly more efficient as well as less likely to freeze up on low airflow situations. It is not recommended to install a new condenser on an old evap coil. There has been a lot of changes to the design of the coils in the last little while. For example a 10 year old 2 ton coil may only have 3 cubic feet of volume but a new 2 ton coil may have 4 cubit feet of volume.

There are many factors that may have infulenced the decision on what size condenser to install. Many of which can only be done by visiting the home and doing alot of work, checking the duct sizing bioth supply and return, inspecting the insulation and windows of the home etc. etc. Most of the time that never gets done. You can blame the contractor for not doing a complete check, but at the same time you can blame the customer because many contractors that are that good loose the job to a cheaper bid that did not no any of the research. It is a catch 22 for everyone involved.

There is ALOT more to sizing equipment that many people think, sadly that also includes many HVAC contractors. Way too many people use "rule of thumbs" or flat out "guess".

Sorry for the rant but your queston can only be answered by a good well educated HVAC contractor visiting your home. That type of a contractor is getting hard to find these days in such a price competetive world.

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5 Answers

Ignitor glows, but no gas


Most likely either a bad board or no gas to gas valve. Bleed out all air in the gas line. Check for 24 volts at both gas valve and circuit board terminals leading to gas valve. No voltage = bad board.

Jul 23, 2008 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

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