Question about Dayton Electric Heater

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Horizontal electric hot water tank installtion

Can a conventioanl electric hot water tank be installed horizontally?
If yes, what extra steps need to be taken?
We are renovating a bathroom that has the hot water tank in it and would like to re-install the tank horizontally in the crawl space below the bathroom.
Thanks for your help

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  • Willow_AK May 27, 2008

    Yes, I do have a need for a horizontal hot water tank, but GAS.

    I have also heard this style referred to as a "Pancake style," which uused to be used approx 30 yrs ago.

    Where can I get one?? Thank you in AK.

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Water heaters are designed to be installed upright. The dip tube allows for cold water to be distributed to the bottom of the tank, and to be heated as it rises. Installed horizontally would defeat the purpose of the dip tube, it would heat the volume of water in the tank, but almost immediately the water would get cold.

The tankless water heater is the best for your situation. You only mentioned electric, so I assume that is your only option. There are several options in an electric tankless. You need to decide what gpm (gallons per minute) you need for your situation.

If it is an option, the gas tankless water heater has a better gpm rate options, but you have to take into consideration the issue of venting.

Both options, are a lot smaller than that of a conventional water heater.

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Posted on Jul 29, 2008

Newark make horizontal hot water tanks of all sizes.

Posted on Jul 12, 2008

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Hello; no, unfortunately conventional elec. water heaters are only designed to operate in the upright position. one alternative is an electric tankless model. but beware there are a few things to explore about them before making the decision.

Posted on Mar 30, 2008

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1 Answer

Lowe's Item Number: 140389


Assuming you have waited a couple hours and the water is still not getting hot there are too many different reasons that the tank might not be heating. Is it Gas or Electric? Is the burner on? Is the thermostat set to turn on, or set to a higher temperature? if you open the water valve at the bottom of the tank, check to see if the water is warm, cold, or hot. (POSSIBLE BURN HAZZARD BE CAREFUL so dont put your hand under the valve and open it, have it pour into a container, and then touch the water with a stick, and then touch it to your hand or some other safe way like that)
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