Question about Timex 16132 Wrist Watch

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Changing the CR1216 battery

I couldn't get the back of the case off, to save my life, until I used a pocket knife and literally forced it off, resulting in a broken washer and a scratched up case back. I changed the battery and now I cannot get the back cover back on. It will not snap back onto the inner works and I really don't want to use a hammer. I have used Timex watches for over 40 years and never had this kind of a problem. I figured it was stuck on by grime, but once I got the cover off there was no grime. I cleaned off the edge anyway and, of course, this silly skinny little washer is of no use now. I've had the watch about two years and it has lasted longer than most since I am very hard on watches. But that is why I always buy Timex, because they can still take a licking. Let's see if it will keep on ticking after I take a hammer to its backside, because it is now un-wearable. And, no I don't have the contraption the watch came in. It wasn't a box and it has been two years and I never dreamed I'd need that tiny little pamphlet that came with it to change a battery! This is about my 30th Timex. I'd hate to have it be my last, but I'm not going through this again. Thank you for letting me vent. Any suggestions?

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: Timex Indiglo WR 30M Wristwatch

First, find the arrow on the back and use a small screwdriver or knife to pry open the back at that point. Replace battery and then replace back wiht the arrow pointing to the middle of the band as orginially found. Third, press the back on the left side and then use a rubber mallet to strike the "raised" side down and it'll snap in place. Alternative method -- use a cushioned screw clamp to compress the back.

Posted on Aug 15, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: how do I change time on timex watch?

These directions are for a four button 1440 Series Timex watch. I emailed customer service with the three digit number on the back of the watch and they sent me directions how to change the time and it actually worked. Here are the steps.

1. With time and date showing, press (constantly) SET (approximately until you count to 20-25)
2. Seconds flash, Press "Start\Stop" to round time to the nearest minute, setting seconds to zero.
3. Press MODE. Hour flashes. Press START\STOP to change hour, including AM (no symbol) and PM.
4. Press MODE. Minutes flash. Press START\STOP to change minutes, hold button to scan values.
5. Press MODE. Month flashes. Press START\STOP to change month.
6. Press MODE. Date flashes. Press START\STOP to change date.
7. Press MODE. Day flashes. Press START\STOP to change day.
8. Press MODE. Time format flashes. Press START\STOP to select 12-24 hour time format. 12 hour format has AM\PM.
9. Press SET, at any step to exit and save settings.

Date (day of the month) appears in upper part of display in Time mode. Press and hold START\STOP to see month and date in large digits.

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: timex watch cover replacment

Align the caseback exactly as it was before you opened it. Make sure thet the groove for stem is in correct position. Lay the napkin on the flat table surface, put the watch on it (dial down) and using both hands and your body weight push the caseback down back in place. Remember: the side of the caseback wich first came out must be last pushed in.
Do not use very soft napkin (towel) as this can brake the glass under the pressure.
If all above described DO NOT work, then there is not enough power in your hands or not enough weight in your body and you will need watchmakers help (he/she will be using special watch press to close the watch).
P.S. Do not get upset if you can not close it; I'm very expierenced watchmaker and very often came across the watches wich I was not able to close without the watch press (even my arms are quite strong and the weight is 95kg).

Do not forget to rate, please.

Posted on Mar 07, 2009

pgh_pa_guy
  • 2992 Answers

SOURCE: changing the date on a timex perpetual calendar watch

You can download the Perpetual Calendar instructions from Timex's website here.
If you don't like clicking on a link, here's the URL:
http://assets.timex.com/instructions/perpetualCal.pdf

Hope this helps. If this solution has been what you needed, please take a moment to rate it a fixya, and thanks for asking here!

Posted on Mar 11, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: lost the beep on my timex watch alarm

Try taking the back off and orientating it the other way (i.e. turn top for bottom). You don't have to screw it down to see if this will work. As soon as the back clicks in you will be able to hear beeps as you press the buttons

Posted on Jun 11, 2010

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1 Answer

Changing the battery in a mickey mouse pocket watch


The first answer is a canned answer. Seen it before. Examine the edge of the pocket watch. Start at the stem and look for a slight gap where the back cover meets the case. It is usually at the stem side or hinge side. Once located take a strong sharp knife and carefully pry up the back cover. It should remove fairly easily. I have about 12 pocket watches and they all work the same way. Once open there may be a small screw or two holding the battery in place. You will need a precision screw driver set or a small screw driver for glasses.
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Jun 30, 2013 | Watches

1 Answer

How do i change the battery?


If you have a Timex digital watch, the back of your watch is probably attached with four little screws, one at each corner of the case. If you remove the screws, the back of the case should lift off with only a little nudge in case some grunge has glued the back to the rest of the case.

On the other hand, if you have an analog Timex watch (i.e., one with a traditional face), it almost certainly has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches with snap-fit cases have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker, you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 31, 2011 | Timex Watches

1 Answer

How do I open the back of the Acqua Indiglo watch so I can change the CR2016 battery?


Your watch has a snap-fit case; the back is simply pressed back into position with firm pressure. The problem is that modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted to increase their water-resistance--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you will ultimately need a jeweler's case press to get the back of this watch back into place (more on this later).

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. Many Timex watches have a small triangle / pointer etched into the case back to suggest where you should fit a case knife to pop off the watch. If you don't see that small raised section or a marker (Aqua is a discount brand of Timex), you'll need to choose a location to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose.

If you can't press the back on securely after replacing the battery, you will need to use a case press to complete the job. A case press is just what it sounds like: a device for clamping watch cases back together. It's designed to provide an equal amount of force around the edges of the watch back without putting that same pressure on the watch crystal (which could cause it to crack or break). I'm aware of two basic styles. One style looks vaguely like a big pair of pliers, but with two swiveling plates instead plier jaws. The other style, which I prefer, sits on a table or workbench and uses a lever to push down the top plate. In both cases, nylon jigs are inserted to match the size of your watch.

You can find case knives, case presses, and other watch repair tools at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

CANNOT GET BACK OPEN TO REPLACE BATTERY


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back, just in case I'm wrong.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for a pretty reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

If you can't close the watch case with your bare hands and don't have access to a case press, your safest bet may be to go to a jewelry store or jewelry counter in a department store and ask if they could close the back for you with the proper tool. You may have to tip them a few dollars, but that is still far cheaper than the cost of replacing a broken watch crystal.

May 29, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

How to open


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off. Pictures I've seen of your specific watch suggest to me that you have a snap-fit case back, though I'll include instructions about a screw-on back just in case I'm wrong.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, modern snap-fit case backs are often very tightly fitted--they can be tough to get off, but they're even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

May 29, 2011 | Peugeot 194M Wrist Watch

1 Answer

I have a ZR11622 I can't get the back off to replace the battery!


The back of your watch is attached in one of two ways. Look at the watch back. If it's smooth all around the circumference of the back, you have a snap-fit back. If, however, you see little notches cut into the edges--if they were extended, it would make the back look like a pizza that's been cut into slices--then you have a back that screws on and off.

A snap-fit case back often has a small (very small) raised section at one spot of the rim; this is so you can insert a tool called a case knife and pop the back off. If you don't see that small raised section, you'll need to wiggle the blade of your case knife under the edge and gently apply leverage from there--it's usually easiest by one of the watch lugs, as opposed to near the watch crown. If you don't have a case knife, you can often use a thin (but tough!) knife blade to do the same thing. Remember, though, that applying this much force through a knife blade can distort or take a chunk out of your edge, so be prepared to sacrifice a knife or be prepared to re-sharpen it after this exercise. A screwdriver does not work very well; the blades are typically too narrow to provide good leverage without distorting the case back, and they may even cutt a gouge into the watch body. Avoid using them for this purpose. To increase the water resistance of watches, Relic case backs are often very tightly fitted--they're tough to get off, and even tougher to push back into position. I would not be surprised if you would need a jeweler's press to get the back of this watch back into position.

If, on the other hand, you have a case back with notches in it, you will need to unscrew the back of the watch. You'll need a special wrench to do this. There are lots of makers and models from a basic $5 "watch crab" to a $100 workbench-mounted device that works on all kinds of watches, including Rolexes. Again, because screw backs are usually tightly fastened to increase water resistance, simply using a pair of needle-nose pliers in the ridges probably won't work. Nor will using a screwdriver in one notch--these backs are designed to move when equal pressure is applied around the edges, and applying force in one area only locks things up. Under no circumstances try to pry off the back if you have a screw back -- this will damage the threads, and you'll probably never be able to get the watch back together again.

You can find case knives and case wrenches at many jewelry supply stores, mail order supply houses like Otto Frei (http://www.ottofrei.com/store/home.php?cat=296 will take you right to the watch repair tools), and on eBay. However, if you're near a Harbor Freight store, they sell a "watch battery changing kit" and jeweler's press for an extremely reasonable price. These aren't the ultra-high quality tools that a professional jeweler would use, but they'll be perfectly fine for changing the occasional battery for many years. I've probably closed 100+ watches using the inexpensive press I got from there.

May 26, 2011 | Relic Watches

1 Answer

How do you remove the back to replace the battery. Does the back unscrew or does it snap off.


if its flat with no notches then you can use a pocket knife or small flat blade and look for a notch underneath the case back, there is usually an indentation where the case remover can slip in . Then you have to carefully force the knife inside and wiggle it up and down till it pops off. Be very careful you can cut yourself doing this or even damage the watch by slipping the blade inside and ruining the movement.

If it has a screw back you would see notches on the back of the case going around the diameter usually 6 or so notches. There you would need a special watch opener tool that fits into those holes and would unscrew it.

I would recommend taking it to a fast fix or batteryplus for about 7 dollars you can have them replace it. That way you can prevent yourself from ruining your watch or hurting yourself.

if you do open the watch up be careful not to touch the copper coil if you scratch that you will ruin the movement and need that replaced. if its flat with no notches then you can use a pocket knife or small flat blade and look for a notch underneath the case back, there is usually an indentation where the case remover can slip in . Then you have to carefully force the knife inside and wiggle it up and down till it pops off. Be very careful you can cut yourself doing this or even damage the watch by slipping the blade inside and ruining the movement.

If it has a screw back you would see notches on the back of the case going around the diameter usually 6 or so notches. There you would need a special watch opener tool that fits into those holes and would unscrew it.

I would recommend taking it to a fast fix or batteryplus for about 7 dollars you can have them replace it. That way you can prevent yourself from ruining your watch or hurting yourself.

if you do open the watch up be careful not to touch the copper coil if you scratch that you will ruin the movement and need that replaced.

Oct 14, 2010 | Guess 10543L1 10543 Watch for Women

4 Answers

I have a Majestron quartz pocket watch. How do I replace the battery?


  • Flip over your pocket watch. Remove the back of your watch. The back of watches are either screwed on by four small Phillips head screws (unscrew them) or the watch has a press inserted back (slide a thin knife blade under the edge of the back of the watch and pry it off).
  • Remove the circular watch battery out of the back of the watch.
  • Take the battery to any department store or watch store and purchase a new replacement battery.
  • Insert the new battery into the back of the watch.
  • Screw on or push on the back of the watch. Set the watch to the correct time.
  • Aug 23, 2010 | Watches

    1 Answer

    Dont know how to open the case of my jules jirgensen pocket watch


    Its like a clasp just use a knife an open it at back case you can groove where you placed the knife tip.

    Hope it may helps:

    Jun 21, 2009 | Jules Jurgensen 7381 Pocket Watch

    1 Answer

    Can't open the wrist watch case


    Use a Testor's razor knife with eye protection. Use as much of the blade edge as possible. The Testor's blades are fairly strong and thin and I have used them on many Skagens before. I have had some Swiss cases with no gap or tab and the tightest tolerances and the Testor's hobby knife blades were the only hope and solution. Please use care and eye protection for any repairs or service of this nature. Things break and fly off with great force. Including the blade of a knife or razor knife.

    Dec 03, 2008 | Skagen Watches

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