Question about Samsung Digimax i6 PMP Digital Camera

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Overly white pictures

When I take pictures they come out very white. Only when I film the colors are normal. I've already checked the white balance adjuster, but this doesn't seem to have any effect. Additionaly I sometimes have lines running through my pics. Can somebody help us? Thanks! i've purchase a samsung digimax L60 and my problem is this,when doing vedio/taking photos indors,the camera works perfect.but the moment i would go out door in the sun i have this overly white pictures problem. please help need that camera badly.

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The shutter is defective

Posted on Mar 29, 2008

  • Benjamin Patri
    Benjamin Patri Mar 29, 2008

    you will need to contact Samsung about this 1-800-SAMSUNG

    or take to a dealer/repairman and get this fixed

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How are the calibration setting for UN60H7150


hears?
Samsung H7150 Calibration and Picture Settings 1080p 3D Smart LED TV by Robert Wiley, Senior Editor
The H7150 Series
UN46H7150 Review UN55H7150 Review UN60H7150 Review UN65H7150 Review UN75H7150 Review H7150 Calibration Notes: Calibration was very accurate and easy to aquire with the H7150 series LED TV. In fact, it is pretty close to the D6500 color temperature that our calibration shoots for. Be sure that you are changing the AutoMotion Plus feature settings depending on the programming you are watching. That is one of the most important things to keep in mind. With most programming you will want to turn it off or at least the De-judder portion. With 3D really does see a benefit from this, so you may want to leave it on. The Color Space needs no adjustments for a good calibration.
tv-calibration.jpg
A television in the process of being calibrated before we begin our review.

Post Calibration Picture Settings Picture Mode Movie Backlight Contrast Brightness Sharpness Color Tint G50/R50 PIP Off
Advanced Settings Dynamic Contrast Off Black Tone Off Flesh Tone Color Space Custom White Balance (See Table) 10pt White Balance (See Table) Gamma Expert Pattern Off xvYCC Off
Picture Options Color Tone Warm2 MPEG Noise Filter Off HDMI Black Level Low Film Mode Off AutoMotion Plus Off Smart LED Off Cinema Black Off White Balance R-Offset G-Offset B-Offset R-Gain G-Gain B-Gain
10pt White Balance Interval Red Green Blue
Screen Adjustment Picture Size Screen Fit

(Note: Logo/images/Pictures has a respective copyright. I used it for demonstration purpose only.
If something in your mind to comment or suggest, please let us know. In our efforts to provide detailed information, there is possibility of inaccurate contents. If you see any mistake or incomplete in our information, please don't hesitate to tell us. We will fix it immediately as soon as possible.

Jun 30, 2014 | Cell Phones

9 Answers

The pictures are too blue.


It sounds like a White Balancing problem. I'd guess if it's set on Auto WB, then you'll need to do it manually. Some digital cameras tend to produce that blue tint when left to white balance themselves.

If you don't understand completely let us know the exact model of the camera and I'm sure somebody can talk you through it!

Oct 01, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

When I take a picture in p setting it comes out with a blue cast. When taken i automatic, it comes out in correct colors


You didn't specify the model of your camera so I can't be too precise here.
Since it does appear to be a white balance issue, I'd say you've got the white balance set too warm. The camera compensates by adding blue to the scene and hence you get the blue tint. Either set the white balance to match the scene, or else set it to "Auto".

Feb 03, 2012 | Canon Photography

1 Answer

Having problems with quality of pictures taken inside....they all have a "yellow" color tint to them. Any suggestions? Camera takes excellent outside pictures.


Check your white balance setting. Indoor incandescent bulbs have a yellow color that we normally aren't aware of but shows up in a photo. Usually, when you have your camera set on auto white balance, the camera can correct for it but if it can't, you can set the white balance for tungsten/indoor light.

Aug 14, 2011 | Panasonic LUMIX DMCZS7 DMCTZ10 Digital...

1 Answer

TAKING NIGHT SUNSET PICTURES


this is becouse your not setting the "white balance"
up in the camera first,,,some digital cameras have a manual set up for "white balance" what the camera is doing is trying to put the color cast thats in a sun set right so it looks like day light,,,and you wont that color cast in the pitcher to give it that feeling,,,unless you over ride this white balance you will never get the color you are after,,, i use 35 mm film for sun sets
it will wip a digital camera every time here,,
but its horses for corses,good luck with your sun sets,,, but over ride that white balance first if you can

Nov 16, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare Z712 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am a surgeon when I take pictures of muscle or bloody objects the red color seems to melt and the red is overly saturated and all sharpness and definition to the photo is lost usually taken with a...


The Fuji S2 sensor is noted for this red sensitivity. Here's a few different approaches to getting the shot with the S2, all of which require some experimentation.

1. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Underexpose the shot. Progressively change the exposure compensation downward until when checking the histogram, the red channel does not show saturation at the high end. Advantages: this is the simplest approach to getting the picture. Disadvantages: the S2 already had a fairly limited dynamic range, and this will make things worse for the parts of the photo that are not red. For the surgical setting and use of a ringflash, this may not be much of a disadvantage, since a lot of the stuff of interest will be red, and ringflash illumination generally is of lower contrast than directional lighting.

2. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Use a custom white balance. The idea here is to have the camera adjust the red channel sensitivity itself, and leave the blue and green channels alone. To do this, start with several sheets of white paper and a red or pink marker or highlighter. Scribble with the marker across a sheet, then use that to set a custom white balance. Take a test shot of the red stuff that has been problematic, and see whether the histogram for the red channel shows that there is no saturation at the high end. Repeat this with progressively more red or pink on each sheet used to set the custom white balance until you find the custom white balance that takes enough of the edge off the red channel response. Alternative: I just tried out making a gradient across an 8.5x11" sheet of paper going from white to about 30% red saturation. I can set more or less red adjustment in a custom white balance just by pointing the camera at different parts of the page. This seems to work OK for me. Advantage: can allow the full dynamic range of the sensor to be used. Disadvantages: the experimentation period is likely to take a while to get the best results, and the final images are unlikely to look completely natural.

3. Set the "Color" Function option to "B/W". Use a green or cyan filter on the lens to cut the amount that the red color channel contributes to the final image. Advantages: this is fairly simple as an approach. A similar post-processing technique can be applied to the photos that you already have, by nulling out the red channel contribution and desaturating the blue and green channels to produce a grayscale image. Disadvantages: you lose the color information entirely. Since much of what you want information about is colored red anyway, the organs are likely to appear quite dark when only taking the blue and green channel contributions to the image.

Feb 26, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

6 Answers

Overly white pictures


This may be due to jammed iris at fully open. You are over exposing the photographs. if the iris is stucked due to friction a little tappin your camera from side may help you.

Sep 08, 2006 | Samsung Digimax i6 PMP Digital Camera

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon Optura 500 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

Pictures reddish or orange


Although normal room lights (tungsten lights) appear white to our eyes, their light is actually much "warmer" than daylight, giving a reddish or orange color to pictures. This happens with digital and film cameras. To prevent or lessen this reddish or orange color: If your digital camera has a selectable White Balance mode (check your camera's User's Guide) and you are not using the camera or external flash, set the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" light. If your pictures are reddish even when you use the camera flash or external flash, the room lighting is overpowering the flash. Try setting the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" and continue to use the flash. If your camera does not have a selectable White Balance mode, use the camera flash or external flash when taking pictures in lighting that makes your pictures turn out reddish or orange. If you can, turn down or turn off one of the room lights (without making the room too dark), or move your subject so that it is not being hit directly by the room lights. If you can, when taking pictures in the daytime, try opening any drapes that might be covering windows. Letting in natural daylight improves the color quality of the lighting.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare One Digital Camera

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