Question about Cycling

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?

The bike makes a loud rubbing noise. Any ideas?

Posted by Anonymous on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 2 Answers

The most common problem that causes a loud rubbing sound is a tire, usually the back tire, rubbing on the frame, and you can usually see exactly where it is rubbing. Brakes can rub too, but they usually are not that loud, so let's assume it is the tire. This happens when the rear axle wasn't tight enough, and when you pedal hard or hit a pothole, it can make the axle pivot in the slots it fits in, and this lets the tire to rub on the frame, usually on the front part of the rear tire.
Solution: For this kind of work, I usually flip the bike upside down on an old piece of carpet, etc. so it is sitting on the seat and handlebars with the front wheel pointing straight ahead. There are two common methods to secure the axle:
1. Two pretty good sized nuts, one on each side. Find a wrench that fits just right. I prefer a socket, box end or open end wrench, one for each side. On metric nuts, it will often be 14mm or 15mm, sometimes bigger. American sizes are usually in the 9/16 - 5/8 - 11/16" range. I strongly discourage you from using any kind of pliers or even an adjustable (crescent) wrench. You have to tighten these babies pretty tight, and you can easily burr the corners off your nuts with adjustable tools, believe me I've done it. The tricky part is you have to do three things at once. First, you have to keep the front part of the tire evenly spaced between the two sides of the frame. Next, you have to slide both sides of the axle back in their slots until the chain has the proper tension. If you have a ten-speed style bike, the derailler mechanism will adjust the tension automatically for you, so slide the axle all the way back until the side with the gears is against the back of its slot, and let the other side move forward or back as needed for the tire to be centered between the frame. Finally, while you are keeping things lined up - a patient friend who is willing to help makes this much easier, just have them hold the tire so it is evenly spaced between the frame, and then you have to tighten the nuts. If you don't have a ten-speed style gear changer on the back tire, you have to take up most of the slack in the chain yourself and hold it tight until you get those nuts tight enough to keep the axle from slipping. Don't be surprised if you have to loosen up the nuts and do it again - on a single speed bike you should have about 1/4" to 1/2" of flex in the middle of the chain, halfway between the front and rear sprockets. Too tight, and it can wear out your bearings or chain well before their time. Too loose, and your chain will fall off at the worst possible moment, and you will have to do this process all over again, after you push your bike back home. Tighten a little on each side until things get snug, and if the tire is still centered between the frame, do both sides again, harder now (grunt a little this time, it helps) and you should be good to go. Remember, you are not trying to strip the axle threads, or break anything, but you do have to get it tight enough so it won't slip on you again.
2. Oh, yeah, there is another common method you find pretty often on ten-speed style bikes, the quick release.
The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas? - 91177b4.jpg This is an assembly that consists of a lever built onto the axle nut, and the lever is only on one side. You don't use a wrench on the quick release, but they are a little tricky until you understand how they work. As you pull the lever away from the frame, a cam inside loosens the axle, and as you push the lever toward the frame, it tightens. When the lever is in the loose position, you can also spin the nut on the axle tighter or looser (careful, it doesn't take much, and clockwise should be tighter on most bikes). Tightening or loosening the nut part does most of travel, and the lever does the last little bit. The lever is short, usually only 2-3 inches, so if you don't have to push pretty hard on the lever, the nut is probably too loose, and you need to loosen the lever and rotate the nut part clockwise a little bit, until it feels like the axle is getting really good and tight just about the time the lever gets close to the frame. This can also take 2-3 tries of loosening the lever, tightening or loosening the nut, and retightening the lever again, until it feels good and tight, and of course, you have to check your tire alignment one more time to make sure it is still nicely centered between the frame of the bike. Turn the wheel by hand a few turns to make sure it doesn't rub on the frame. If everything is tight, and your tire is still centered, you're ready for a test ride. Just up and down the driveway to start with, and make sure your brakes are okay. Then you can go a little farther, and pedal a little harder. Hopefully the axle will be nice and solid, and you can say, "Good Job! I fixed it myself, on Fixya!"

Posted on May 14, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My washer makes a loud rubbing noise only during the wash cycle any idea what could be causing it?


Look at the pulley under the bottom center. On this model the nut often backs off and makes the pulley sit wrong which causes a kind of grinding noise.

Sep 27, 2015 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud noise when pedaling


I suspect the crankset or bottom bracket. It can have the illusion of tightness when not moving, but "clunk" everytime you pres on the pedals. I would first make sure that the cranks are tight on the bottom bracket axle. This will require a metric wrench.

Oct 10, 2014 | Huffy Cranbrook 26" Mens Cruiser Bike

1 Answer

Model #17-1381. We just bought our bike at Canadian Tire. The chain is very loud. We tried to change gears but it clicks and then goes back to being loud again and also clicks periodically.


Model numbers are irrelevant as all bike makers use commonly available components manufactured by a small handful of companies.

This problem is why bikes should be purchased at real Bicycle Shops - setup is right and there is usually a follow-up after break-in.

You get to learn how to DIY because you HAVE to.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/categories/derailleur-systems

Key to all of this is OBSERVATION. Noises need to be localized. Something is rubbing somewhere.

Use a search engine for "how to shift a bicycle", "bicycle chain makes noise" and any other questions you might think of and you will find many videos.

Jun 29, 2011 | Schwinn Cycling

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?


yeah, hold it up to the screen. Hmmm.

Or maybe get creative, look it over yourself and tell us where the rubbing might be.

Chances are a tire is rubbing the frame somewhere. Either starighten the way thewheel is mounted in the frame or you have a VERY untrue wheel. Bike Shop time.

Mar 17, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

My bike rear suspension makes loud squeeky noise


have you tryed re oiling it the seal may have gone causing it to rub.

Feb 23, 2010 | kawasaki Full Suspension Mountain Bike Men

3 Answers

Vfr 400 nc24 whining noise when engine is reved


The loud whining noise is just normal for vfr 400 because it is gear driven cam.. As you reach 5000rpm up, the bike's electrics try to misfire the plugs so it would act as a speed limiter (180kph).. You have to bypass the sensor at the speedo..

Sep 28, 2009 | 1988 Honda VFR 400 R NC24

1 Answer

My dryer is making a loud banging noise on the left side of sounds like something is rubbing in it. Any idea what it might be, and how to fix it?


Hi,
Here is a tip that I wrote about dryers and noises...

It will help you determine what is happening there...

Dryer Repair Squeaks, Grinding, Clicking and Knocking Noise


heatman101


76fg

Jun 24, 2009 | Maytag Neptune MDE4000 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Rubbing noise comming from underneath or rear of bike.


I will bet the chain is talking to you. I can hear its' voice from here... it's saying " Please adjust me , please adjust me, and lubricate me also." Chains can be such a pain at times. :)

Please rate this answer. Thanks keakins2! :)

Apr 14, 2009 | 2003 kawasaki VN 800 Vulcan Classic

1 Answer

Whirlpool Ultimate Care Model LSR8233EQO - Loud noise during final rinse/spin


Sounds like the clutch, mi9ne works fine but is noisey when spinning, repair guy said it was the clutch.

Feb 05, 2008 | Whirlpool Ultimate Care II LSQ9564J Top...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cycling Logo

Related Topics:

150 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cycling Experts

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

74896 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

John Egan
John Egan

Level 2 Expert

73 Answers

Are you a Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...