Question about Eclipse PA5422 Car Audio Amplifier

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I was given the amp and I want to test it with a volt meter to see if it even works. I currently dont have a system .

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Jst hook up the power were it says power and rem and ground to grn

Posted on May 14, 2010

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BUFFALO TOOLS 2000 WATT GENERATOR 12 VOLT OUTPUT BUT NO AMPS WILL NOT EVEN LIGHT A 12 VOLT TEST LIGHT BUT VOLT METER READS 12 V.D.C. WHAT IS WRONG ? PLEASE HELP.LABEL SAYS FOR 12 VOLT BATTERY CHARGING


have the voltage regulator system checked
in the regulator the voltage controls the amperage allowed and it that unit is not working properly then there will be no current out put
that regulator could be part of the control board for the main ac out put and may have developed a fault in the section for 12 volts on the board
there is a limit on the charge rate for the battery and if it is exceed it may have damaged that circuit or possible blown a fuse in the amperage circuit

May 07, 2016 | Buffalo Tools Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Car wont start unless I boost it checked battery and it reads 12.43 on multi meter and checked when I boosted it and went up to 14on meter


A healthy battery reading 12.43 should still be capable of cranking an engine fast enough with enough current left over for the fuel and sparks to start - that is assuming the spark plugs, etc. are also in good condition.

An off-load reading of 12.43 means little on it's own and is only one of a number of tests used to determine battery state. The most important test is to measure the battery voltage while the engine is cranking. It is reckoned a healthy battery attached to a healthy engine, starter, ignition system, etc. will ideally read no less than 12 volts - an analogue meter is best for this test.

12 volts is rather optimistic even for a serviceable system. 10 volts is more realistic and some engines will happily start at 9 volts as long as the cranking speed is still good but any lower and either the battery is in a too-low state of charge, is faulty or the starter motor is taking too much current and needs servicing.

Apr 24, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to fix no lowbeam headlights on 97 geo metro


did you check the HL fuses? x2
are both dead? or just one?
Highs work , right,?
would you like to guess, ?
or test? have a volt meter, and a schematic.?
DRL or non DRL system? (daylight running lamps).
2 systems, DRL is mostly in CANADA but no always,
when did they both last work, dont know, or last week>???
if dont know, why not test the lamps to see if they are good
using any 12vdc battery over 5amp current.
or use and OHm meter on the filaments, for lows. 0 ohms good
infinity bad.
to go father, we need what type HL system is on car.
DLR or not. DLR love to fail. for sure.

Sep 06, 2014 | 1997 Geo Metro

1 Answer

Yamaha sr 500 battery boils over


Hi, Stuart before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Yamaha SR 500 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-sr-owners-manuals

Jun 09, 2017 | Yamaha Motorcycles

1 Answer

1995 Yamaha virago 1100?stator not working or not charging


Hi, Ken before testing any electrical component in the Charging System Circuit it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amps causing the battery to be faulty and must be replaced, especially "AGM" batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.viragohelp.com/virago-charging-systems
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/VS-1100-chagre-syst.pdf
http://service.tanga-moteurs.ro/data/yamaha_virago_535_700_1100.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha Virago XV1100K Owner Manual

Mar 06, 2012 | Yamaha Motorcycles

1 Answer

Battery does not hold charge battery is good


How do you know the battery is good? Have you had a load test performed on the battery? Just because a battery reads 12 volts when using a volt meter doesn't tell you anything. You need to have the battery load tested. If it tests good, charge the battery to full charge. Put it in the bike and connect the negative battery cable. Using a good Digital Volt Ohm Meter that will measure amps up to ten amps. Set the meter up to measure AMPS. and put it in it's highest scale. Put the postive lead of the meter to the postive battery post. Put the negative meter lead to the postive battery cable that is disconnected from the battery. If you have a current drain, lower the scale range until you get a stead readable value. Then, disconnect the voltage regulator from the battery and read the current drain. Since you bike is ECM controlled, it will draw a little current but not over one amp.

Good luck
Steve

Jul 12, 2011 | Harley Davidson FLHR-FLHRI Road king...

2 Answers

I have a 1998 Isuzu Trooper. The battery keeps going dead. I bought a new battery and took the alternator off and had it checked. The alternator is good and the battery keeps dying. Is there a fuse I am...


Well, not necessarily a fuse, but a current draw. You need to find the draw.

Pull the fuse for the interior lights (so you can open doors and not alter your tests) and clock. Take off negative battery cable and put the volt meter or test light in series between batt terminal and cable. If the light lights or volts higer that a couple of volts, disconnect items one at a time and re test.

Start with the alternator, it is the most likely. It has a series of diodes that change current from alternating to DC, when one fails it leaks current. The unit may still charge, but not as well as with good diodes. The only test for diodes is a scope, or take it apart and test them individually. Use ohms and current flow in one direction, reverse test leads and no current. Failed diode will flow or connect in both directions.

Anyways, you will have an answer pretty quick if you test battery current draw and disconnect one system at a time and retest.

Oct 10, 2010 | 1998 Isuzu Trooper

1 Answer

Hi, my bikes battery seems to lose charge. Initially, I noticed that my headlight flickered when I had the indicator or brake lights on even when the engine was running. After some days later, the charge...


Hi, Sam_ before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Motorcycle Message Board Motorcycle USA
Battery being drained won hold charge 1985 Magna V45 US
Honda VT250 FII Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT250 FII Owner Manual

Apr 20, 2017 | 1985 Honda VT 250 F

1 Answer

I am searching for the start up current on Fridge/Freezer WR122S. As I am planing to run the Fridge on a sola system. So I need the start up current or amps and running current & amps. As I need this...


i think that your power is 50 cycle as in the us it's 60 cycle . the current is 120 in us and i belive your's will be 220 . so the amps will be 1/2 of the value on 220 than 110 volts so 15 amps at 110 would be 1/2 that at 220 . ..this is ver general but close for what your doing . . it is easy to use a clamp on amp meter and read the currant draw and amps . and this wil change with brand / and size of compressors. and in some cases heater's and fans and defros systems the units use . good luck and i hope some of this info helps .. mm

Aug 11, 2010 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

I was given the amp and I want to test it with a volt meter to see if it even works. I currently dont have a system .


Easiest way, get any old speaker 4 or 8 ohm and hook it up to channel 1 then plug an rca lead into channel 1, power up amp and touch finger on rca and you should hear pop or scratchy sound from speaker . Audio circuit for channel 1 is good . repeat for channels 2 3 4 .

Mar 17, 2010 | Eclipse PA5422 Car Audio Amplifier

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