Question about Aqua Master Watches

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Aqua Master watch parts

I have an Aqua Master watch. It has the face of Jesus on the dial. The bracelet has raised figures of Jesus face on each end. The bracelet has an h link then a square link. It takes both pieces to expand the size of the bracelet. The watch can be seen on Aqua Master's web site in the online catalog, page 67 first watch in the top row on the left. It is gold.

All of this to ask this one small question - where can I find these links?

many thnks

Bob

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5 Suggested Answers

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: Armitron mens watch band link removal

Try http://www.webjeweller.com/jewellery/removelinks.shtml

Posted on Jul 14, 2008

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: I have a bracelet link

If you are ready to take that risk, here is how you can do that.
First- get watch on your wrist and by squeezing the bracelet count how many links you have to take out to make it tight enough (say 4 for example).
Check the sides of a bracelet. You will notice that the upper bands metal is flipped over the bracelets side. Take tweezers or small pliers and unbend one of these. Try to do as little damage as possible.
When it's done, you will see two metal staples inserted into the bracelet. You have to pull them out. While pulling out, remember how they where positioned, as you will need to drive them back in the same manner.
So, when the staples are out, do the same on the other side of bracelet. Now you have bracelet in two halves.
Count off 4 links and undo the staples in joint of 4th and 5th link in the same manner as previously.
When links are out, take the staples and drive them back into the bracelet koining two ends together. You have to do that exactly the same way and position as you took them out.
When all staples are in place, bend the metal back over to the bracelet sides.
BE WARNED: as you gonna do it first time, be ready that you can damage the bracelet or can not put it back together.

Good luck

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: Can not figure out how to remove links from Casio watch band

You may or may not have arrows inside bracelet. Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet or adding extra link(s) make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin. 
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
If you do not want to do it yourself, any jeweler will do it in a matter of few minutes.
Don't forget to rate, please. 

Posted on Apr 01, 2009

escapement
  • 2334 Answers

SOURCE: Where can I get extra links for a Gucci 1500L

Unfortunately, the only way to get the part is from Gucci directly. Here is the link: http://www.gucci.com/us/us-english/us/about-gucci/legal-notices/assistance.html

Posted on Feb 27, 2010

Testimonial: "Thank you so much for your help. Super fast reply and you saved me alot of time and money for a new band. Much appreciation. Theresa"

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: need instructions for resizing a Link Tag/Heuer Watch bracelet

Hello! I just went through the same thing. If you got the watch new, you can look in the box to find "mini" or "half" links included with the watch. There is no fine adjustment on the Link, but you can replace the larger links with the "mini" links to get the size closer. They are not quite half size, more like 65% of a regular link. So if you add one "mini" link and the watch is too big, you can then replace a regular link with a "mini" link to keep adjusting the size. I went to a dealer (Jared does this, as does Torneau...you talked to the wrong person) and it took about 5 minutes and was $15.
Hope this helps.

Posted on Mar 14, 2010

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1 Answer

The bracelet broken from the watch face. Can this be fixed?


You can try taking it to a jeweler to see if they can do a repair on it. But it is most likely that you will have to get a new skeleton case and transfer all of the inner working from the broken watch to the new case. Here again, a job best done by a jeweler because they would have the speciality tools that are required.

Jun 09, 2014 | Fossil ES2790 Watch

Tip

Watch glossary: C (part1)


CABOCHON
Any kind of precious stone, such as sapphire, ruby or emerald, uncut and only polished, generally of a half-spherical shape, mainly used as an ornament of the winding crown or certain elements of the case.
CALENDAR, ANNUAL
An intermediate complication between a simple calendar and a perpetual calendar. This feature displays all the months with 30 or 31 days correctly, but needs a manual correction at the end of February. Generally, date, day of the week and month, or only day and month are displayed on the dial.
CALENDAR, FULL
Displaying date, day of the week and month on the dial, but needing a manual correction at the end of a month with less than 31 days. It is often combined with the moonphase.
CALENDAR, PERPETUAL
This is the most complex horology complication related to the calendar feature, as it indicates the date, day, month and leap year and does not need manual corrections until the year 2100 (when the leap year will be ignored).
CALIBER
Originally it indicated only the size of a movement, but now this indication defines a specific movement type and shape (e.g. round caliber) and combines it with the constructor's name and identification number. Therefore the caliber identifies the movement.
CANNON
An element in the shape of a hollow cylinder, sometimes also called pipe or bush, for instance the pipe of the hour wheel bearing the hour hand.
CARAT (KARAT)
Unit of gold fineness (and gemstone weight). Pure gold is 24k. 18k gold is 75% pure.
CAROUSEL
Device similar to the tourbillon, but with the carriage not driven by the fourth wheel, but by the third wheel.
CARRIAGE or TOURBILLON CARRIAGE
Rotating frame of a tourbillon device, carrying the balance and escapement. This structural element is essential for a perfect balance of the whole system and its stability, in spite of its reduced weight. As today's tourbillon carriages make a rotation per minute, errors of rate in the vertical position are eliminated. Because of the widespread use of transparent dials, carriages became elements of aesthetic attractiveness.
CASE
Container housing and protecting the movement, usually made up of three parts: middle, bezel, and back.
CENTER SECOND HAND, see sweep second hand.
CENTER-WHEEL
The minute wheel in a going-train.
CHAMPLEVé
Hand-made treatment of the dial or case surface. The pattern is obtained by hollowing a metal sheet with a graver and subsequently filling the hollows with enamel.
CHAPTER-RING
Hour-circle, i.e. the hour numerals arranged on a dial.
CHIME
Striking-work equipped with a set of bells that may be capable of playing a complete melody. A watch provided with such a feature is called chiming watch.
CHRONOGRAPH
A watch that includes a built-in stopwatch function, i.e. a timer that can be started and stopped to time an event. There are many variations of the chronograph.
CHRONOMETER
A high-precision watch. According to the Swiss law, a manufacture may put the word "chronometer" on a model only after each individual piece has passed a series of tests and obtained a running bulletin and a chronometer certificate by an acknowledged Swiss control authority, such as the COSC.
CIRCULAR GRAINING
Superficial decoration applied to bridges, rotors and pillar-plates in the shape of numerous slightly superposed small grains, obtained by using a plain cutter and abrasives. Also called Pearlage or Pearling.
CLASP
The attachment used to connect the two ends of the watch bracelet or strap around the wrist.
- Deployment Buckle - A three-folding enclosure, which secures the two ends of the bracelet and allows enough room for placing the watch on the wrist when fully deployed. When closed, the buckle covers the two-piece folding mechanism
- Hook Lock - Two separate units each fitting on either end of the bracelet which allows the watch to be laid out. One end of the closure hooks onto the other to secure the two ends of the bracelet.
- Jeweler's Clasp - A closure that is generally used on better bracelets. Also allows it to lie flat.
- Sliding Clasp - Also a hook type method but allows for easy sizing of the bracelet by sliding up.
- Twist Lock - A closure similar to Jeweler's Clasp used on ladies jewelry bracelets.
CLOISONNé
A kind of enamel work - mainly used for the decoration of dials - in which the outlines of the drawing are formed by thin metal wires. The colored enamel fills the hollows formed in this way. After oven firing, the surface is smoothed until the gold threads appear again.
CLOUS DE PARIS
Decoration of metal parts characterized by numerous small pyramids.

on Jan 11, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Tissot Seastar 1000 Does anyone know of a source


Tissot is Swatch. They do not sell parts! You need to contact the company OR where you purchased the watch.

http://www.tissot.ch/?mod=stores&action=search&search=&regions=2&countries=195&countryregions=&option=cs

Jan 14, 2010 | Tissot Diver Seastar 1000 Auto Steel Large...

1 Answer

Adjust watch band for Seiko 7T94 Stanless Steel Band


You may or may not have arrows inside bracelet. Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet or adding extra link(s) make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin.
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
If you do not want to do it yourself, any jeweler will do it in a matter of few minutes.
Don't forget to rate, please.

Apr 04, 2009 | Seiko Watches

1 Answer

Can not figure out how to remove links from Casio watch band


You may or may not have arrows inside bracelet. Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet or adding extra link(s) make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin. 
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
If you do not want to do it yourself, any jeweler will do it in a matter of few minutes.
Don't forget to rate, please. 

Apr 01, 2009 | Casio LWQ120DA 7AV Atomic Executive Wave...

1 Answer

Need to switch bands and cant remove pins


You may or may not have arrows inside bracelet. Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet or adding extra link(s) make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin.
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
If you do not want to do it yourself, any jeweler will do it in a matter of few minutes.
Don't forget to rate, please.

Mar 28, 2009 | Nixon Key Men's Watch - Gunmetal Dial -...

1 Answer

Need to remove a link from a Fossil FS 4009 watchband.


You may or may not have arrows inside bracelet. Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet or adding extra link(s) make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin.
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
If you do not want to do it yourself, any jeweler will do it in a matter of few minutes.
Don't forget to rate, please.

Mar 14, 2009 | Fossil Metal Dress Dial FS4009 Watch for...

2 Answers

Clean a watch


Watch cases and bracelets are cleaned in ultrasonic cleaning maschine with the help of special clening liquids.
Mechanical watch movements and mechanical parts of quartz and analog watches are cleaned in special watch cleaning maschines in 3-5 cleaning stages and cleaners.
Electronic parts, circuit boards, LCD screens are cleaned by hand using specialy made cleaning solutions for each individual part.
To do all this you need a watchmakers skills as the watch must be disassembled completely.
Do not forget to rate, please.

Jan 25, 2009 | Bulova Watch

1 Answer

Add links to a Lucien Piccard 26006SS


You may have arrows inside bracelet.Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and start to unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet,make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin.
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
Don't forget to rate, please.

Jan 07, 2009 | Lucien Piccard 26024 Wrist Watch

1 Answer

Shortening stainless band for 1st generation Tissot Le Locle


Arrows are pointing the way the pins must come out.
First you have to find out what sort of pins or even screws are used to keep links together.
Examine both bracelet sides and find the side where pin ends have a groove.
Start with a tiny screwdriver and start to unscrew one of the screws. If it turns, but doesn't come out, that means you have a pins instead.
For removing pins the best would be pin removing tool (approx.5GBP on ebay), but it's possible to do the job without it.
Take a hardened steel needle and blunt the sharp end to the approx. size of pin end diameter using any sharpening stone or sandpaper. Get an old towel and fold it to make a soft base for work (like small cusion). As you don't have a special bracelet holder you will need a pair of helping hands to hold the bracelet steady upright. You will need small hammer and pair of flat nose pliers as well.
NOTE: The pins MUST be driven split end out first, not vice versa. Make sure that the grooved pin ends are facing towel, not the needle and hammer!!!
Now place the watch on the folded towel, take that needle and smallest hammer you have and start driving the pin out using light blows. Do Not hit hard, as you will brake the needle, scratch your watch or even injure yourself. Watchmakers are using 45 gram hammer, so, calculate your strength of blows.
After a few blows check if the split end is coming out and when you see that the end is long enough to grab it with pliers, pull the pin out with pliers. When pulling, do NOT turn pliers, as pins tend to brake when twisted. Use firm grip and your strength to pull the pin without twisting.
After shortening the bracelet,make sure that the pins go back EXACTLY the same way as they came out- the blunt end first in the hole and the split (grooved) end last. Before doing that check remaining pins in bracelet to make sure that you put them back from the right side of bracelet.
It is recommended to use plastic hammer to drive pins back in or you will scratch or damage bracelet. If plastic hammer is not available use an old toothbrush handle (or some plastic item) as an absorber. Simply put pin into the hole as deep as you can with your fingers, put the toothbrush handle on split pin end and hit handle, not the pin.
Make sure that pin ends are flush with bracelet. If needed- hit few more times.
Job done!
Don't forget to rate, please.

Jan 04, 2009 | Tissot Le Locle Automatic Chrono Large...

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