Question about Brinkmann 810-7080-K All-in-One Grill / Smoker

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Electric burner keeps going out in my smoker

Can i replace it with a adjustable thermostat electric element?

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Chef Select oven (2000 vintage, manual controls) won't heat up properly. Heats to about 70-80 deg. but no more. Suspect either the element or thermostat, any ideas?


Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element
The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.



Why is the oven temperature incorrect?

The oven temperature control is usually controlled by a thermostat that uses a capillary and liquid filled bulb. When the bulb's liquid gets heated up, it expands and puts pressure on a diaphragm which opens and closes a switch that controls the gas to the burner. Just set the dial to what you need the temperature to be. Over time, it is possible for your thermostat to lose its calibration. Sometimes, the thermostat sensing bulb comes loose from the holder. If it is out of place, the thermostat may be getting faulty readings. If this is the problem, re-aligning the bulb properly will take care of this problem.

Digital display models use a sensor to control temperature. If this is faulty, replace it. Other ovens use a mechanical system to control the temperature.

On many models, you can adjust your oven thermostat using a small screwdriver. The adjusting screw is located on the thermostat valve stem. Remove the knob and you'll see the screw underneath it. You want to turn the oven on and run it through at least two cycles while watching a calibrating thermometer in the oven for high and low temperatures. Adjust the screw as necessary to fine tune the temperature.

Some models don't have an adjustable thermostat, and you will have to replace the thermostat if you want to resolve the problem.

Mar 28, 2015 | Ovens

1 Answer

Oven not getting up to set temp. both elements working. I suspect the temp sensor. ?


If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element\

Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.

Why is the oven temperature incorrect?

The oven temperature control is usually controlled by a thermostat that uses a capillary and liquid filled bulb. When the bulb's liquid gets heated up, it expands and puts pressure on a diaphragm which opens and closes a switch that controls the gas to the burner. Just set the dial to what you need the temperature to be. Over time, it is possible for your thermostat to lose its calibration. Sometimes, the thermostat sensing bulb comes loose from the holder. If it is out of place, the thermostat may be getting faulty readings. If this is the problem, re-aligning the bulb properly will take care of this problem.

Digital display models use a sensor to control temperature. If this is faulty, replace it. Other ovens use a mechanical system to control the temperature.

On many models, you can adjust your oven thermostat using a small screwdriver. The adjusting screw is located on the thermostat valve stem. Remove the knob and you'll see the screw underneath it. You want to turn the oven on and run it through at least two cycles while watching a calibrating thermometer in the oven for high and low temperatures. Adjust the screw as necessary to fine tune the temperature.

Some models don't have an adjustable thermostat, and you will have to replace the thermostat if you want to resolve the problem.

Jun 28, 2014 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

1 Answer

Zanussi oven keeps cutting out


The reason for my free advice is GOD is good!
Oven comes on and off intermittently or heats very little:

If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element
The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.

May 07, 2014 | Zanussi ZBF360X Electric Single Oven

1 Answer

The grill keeps going off unexpectidly, any tips out there anyone?


Oven comes on and off intermittently or heats very little:

If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element
The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.
The reason for my free advice is GOD is good!

Mar 18, 2014 | Belling XOU592 / XOU593 Electric Double...

1 Answer

Take longer for my food to bake and cook on the inside


Oven comes on and off intermittently or heats very little:

If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.

Why is the oven temperature incorrect?

The oven temperature control is usually controlled by a thermostat that uses a capillary and liquid filled bulb. When the bulb's liquid gets heated up, it expands and puts pressure on a diaphragm which opens and closes a switch that controls the gas to the burner. Just set the dial to what you need the temperature to be. Over time, it is possible for your thermostat to lose its calibration. Sometimes, the thermostat sensing bulb comes loose from the holder. If it is out of place, the thermostat may be getting faulty readings. If this is the problem, re-aligning the bulb properly will take care of this problem.

Digital display models use a sensor to control temperature. If this is faulty, replace it. Other ovens use a mechanical system to control the temperature.

On many models, you can adjust your oven thermostat using a small screwdriver. The adjusting screw is located on the thermostat valve stem. Remove the knob and you'll see the screw underneath it. You want to turn the oven on and run it through at least two cycles while watching a calibrating thermometer in the oven for high and low temperatures. Adjust the screw as necessary to fine tune the temperature.

Some models don't have an adjustable thermostat, and you will have to replace the thermostat if you want to resolve the problem.

Feb 04, 2014 | Frigidaire 30" Self-Cleaning Freestanding...

1 Answer

30" Masterbilt smoker won't get over 60 degrees. I


I am having the same problems with mine. I have rebuilt the connection, three times.
I am going to pull the element out and replace it with a single-burner heating element like the Proctor-Silex 34101. That will be plenty of heat for the smoking I do.

Jan 31, 2011 | Masterbuilt Electric 30inch Smokehouse ...

1 Answer

The rotisserie heating element does not fire up on my barbeques galore grand turbo BBQ. Electric ignite seems to be working, but smell gas no heat


The rotisserie should have a thermocouple near the burner. If you have to hold in the knob, or push a red button to get the gas to flow to the burner, and the electrode sparks and the burner lights, you have to continue to hold the knob or button in until the thermocouple gets hot enough to keep the gas on. If the burner keeps going out, you could have a bad thermocouple.

Dec 22, 2009 | Barbeques Galore 38-inch Grand Turbo...

1 Answer

Meco 5030 Smoker Grill


Partial solution: Their phone number is 800-251-7558. Part number for the electric burner is 03072701. I don't see a thermostat control listed - sorry.

Jun 24, 2008 | Meco 5030 Smoker

1 Answer

Tripping Circuit Breaker


Same problem I have. I think the element or thermostat is gone. You will have to replace them. Here are the part numbers repectively:

4501649
4160214

May 27, 2008 | Char-Broil Electric H2O Smoker

1 Answer

Need electric plug for smoker


go to home depot and get the replacement element for the brinkmann gourmet smoker. costs $29.95. the replacement parts from charbroil (thermostat and element) will cost about $60.00. just remove the elemnt, replace it with the brinkmann and you're back in business.

May 10, 2008 | Char-Broil Electric H2O Smoker

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