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Cutler-happmer BR50SPA wiring

I have a Cutler-happmer BR50SPA 240 v GFCI panel and no wiring instructions.

Two big terminals on top
Three smaller terminals on the bottom, with center connected to neutral.

Which is input & which are output?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: CAN A EHD1020 CIRCUIT BREAKER (CUTLER HAMMER) BE

For 240 if it is a single pole breaker then no. You need a double pole breaker or 2 single breakers , one above the other, connect the red wire to one and the black wire to the other. this way you are drawing from both legs. hope this helps you...

Posted on Sep 16, 2009

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How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Need to install a 2pole 20 amp gfci breaker in an ite bq panel. what are my options as I don't think they make this breaker in type bq?


Hi Pauline, I'm an electrician and can help you with this problem.

The only breakers that are permitted to be installed in any circuit breaker panel are listed inside the door on the label. Introducing any other type or brand is a fire hazard and a code violation. The national electrical code is very clear on this.

If you need to provide a GFCI protected circuit from this panel, you'll probably need to install a smaller panel from this panel - called "sub-panel" of a brand and type that will accept a GFCI circuit breaker. This is done by purchasing a 2P20A GFCI breaker and a smaller circuit capacity / ampacity panel rated for the same voltage as the main panel. You'll also need a ground terminal strip for this panel, too. A 60A main lug panel with 8 or more circuits type panel might be a good place to start. Purchase a 2P circuit breaker with an ampacity no greater than the sub panel is rated at - in my example - a 2P60A would be right. You may use a smaller breaker (2P40A or 2P50A) if you wish - but none greater. Mount the sub panel in a location near the main panel. Remove and discard the bonding screw or lug (if provided and installed already) that may connect the neutral bar and threaded into the panel enclosure. Install the ground terminal strip you purchased separately into the threaded holes provided for it inside the panel enclosure. Install the Ground symbol sticker next to this bar. Run a 4 conductor cable, pipe & wire, etc. feeder sized for 60A based on the location, temperature, etc. between the main panel and the main lug panel. Terminate the cable the sub panel end as follows: black & red or "hot" wires into the the lugs that are connected to the bus bars, white or "neutral" to the neutral bar and the bare or green "ground" wire into the ground terminal strip you installed previously.

Next terminate the other end of the cable. Power off the main panel completely. Terminate the white neutral and the bare or green cable in the neutral bar in separate terminals. Install only one wire per terminal - do not "double up" wires under a single screw. If there is a separate strip for neutral and separate strip for ground - maintain neutral wires to neutral strip and ground wires to ground strip. Also, do not intermix ground and neutral wires in the others terminal strips! Install the 2P60A breaker in an unused space in the main panel. Connect the two hot wires to the breaker terminals. If using aluminum wires, be sure to clean and apply oxide inhibitor to stripped ends of the wires.

Now, you should have a smaller panel with 8 or more empty spaces for circuit breakers that will become live when the 2P60A breaker is in the main panel is turned on. With it still off, install the 2P20A GFCI breaker in the new sub panel. Run your circuit(s) to this panel. Connect them as usual - but any neutral and ground wires installed must be terminated in their respective terminal strips. As mentioned above, never install them in the others strip.

If installing in a 3 phase environment - you may wish to install a 3 phase sub panel so that 3 phase loads can be connected to it. This will require a 3P60A breaker and 5 wires instead of 4 wires to be run between the two panels. The additional wire would be a hot and blue in color for a 240/208/120 panel.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Apr 26, 2012 | Siemens /ite Bq Circuit Breaker Bq3b090 3p...

1 Answer

Why do i get power at the 120v outlet but nothing works when its plugged into the outlet


It sounds like a bad neutral wire. Somewhere the neutral is not properly connected. Most residential wiring operates on a 240 single phase system comprised of two seperate 120 volt legs. Connect between either leg to the neutral gives you 120 volts.connect btween the two legs gives you 240 volts. If the neutral is not present the circuit will search out the other leg to try to complete the circuit causing dimming of lights extremely bright lights and all around chaos. Check ahead of the main to see that the voltage is correct. Check each leg to neutral with a voltage tester. Have some one turn some lights on and off while checking as sometimes a load is required to get fluctuating readings. If the reading fluctuate wildly the problem is between the power grid and the panel. If not recheck on a a couple of breakers and if the readings fluctuate it is on your side of the system.
. Hope this helps
. Bob

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How do you hook up the wires to the starter if there is more then one big red wire? do they all go to the same stud?


Hi, there should be one big wire and one smaller wire. The big wire goes on the top terminal, and the smaller wire goes on the start terminal (marked with an "S"). Do you have more than 2 wires?

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I want to install a cutler hammer 20amp. cuircut breaker in my home. i need instructions on how to wire it up in the breaker box. can anyone help?


20 amp 120 or 240? All 20 amps 120 must be 12 gauge wire for all connections on that circuit.. no exceptions

120- Bring wire into box securely as is done with all the other wires. Shut the breaker to "off". wire the black wire from the screw on the back of the breaker. white wire to the bar with all the other whites. copper to the same bar or separate grounding bar if available. snap breaker into place. turn breaker on

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1 Answer

I just tested the breaker and it won't reset. I have other gfci breakers in the panel and they test and reset fine. Is there anything that can prevent the gfci breaker from resetting?


yes. If you still have the fault it will not reset. Disconnect the out going wire to isolate the breaker and try again. If it still doesn't reset then the GFCI breaker is bad and needs to be replaced. Hope this helps you, Jeepfxr

Jan 28, 2010 | Cutler Hammer 1 Pole 15 Amp Ground Fault

1 Answer

I have a question


Sounds like the breakers are mis-wired. This is a common mistake with those kind of breakers. The white wire that is permanently attached to the breaker (usually coiled) connects to the neutral bar in the panel. Look closely on the breaker, you will see two terminals. The white (circuit) wire that goes out to load connects ONLY to the neutral terminal _on_ the breaker itself, _not_ to the neutral bar in the panel.

Dec 17, 2009 | Cutler Hammer "CUTLER HAMMER" ARC FAULT...

1 Answer

CAN A EHD1020 CIRCUIT BREAKER (CUTLER HAMMER) BE USED IN A 120/240 APPLICATION? BREAKER IS IN A SFDN100 ENCLOSURE (CUTLER HAMMER)


For 240 if it is a single pole breaker then no. You need a double pole breaker or 2 single breakers , one above the other, connect the red wire to one and the black wire to the other. this way you are drawing from both legs. hope this helps you...

Sep 15, 2009 | Cutler Hammer Eaton Electical #BD3030...

1 Answer

I have a 12 year old 40 amp rated hot tub wired with a br50spa gfi to a 40 amp breaker in electric panel. Is this ok?


As long as it is wired with at least #8 wire your 40 amp breaker should be fine. The 50 GFI could not pull over 40 amps from the main panel.

Jul 07, 2009 | Spa Parts Plus GFCI, Circuit Breaker, 40...

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