Question about Yamaha EF2400iS Portable Generator

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I have a yamaha 3000isb generator. checking

I have a yamaha 3000isb generator. checking voltage with multi-meter I get 60 volts between ground and each (hot and neutral) with the generator grounded. Shouldn't I get 0 volts between ground and neutral and 120 volt between hot and ground? If I put one lead in hot and one lead in neutral I get 120Volts. Confused,

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That sucks! Maybe it's because your a fireman! LOL

Posted on May 08, 2010

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1 Answer

How to check if stator is bad


Hi Jose, in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with ohm meter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is grounded and functioning properly, watch video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to ground, meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
https://www.tradebit.com/filesharing.php/search/0/yamaha+yzf-r1

Nov 04, 2015 | Yamaha YZF-R1 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Only has 120 volts,can not get 240volts


the generator consists of 2 120volt windings that run in parallel for 120 volts and in series for 240, check the change over switch make sure a wire hasn't fallen off, if you have a multi meter check both coils have the same resistance

Jul 19, 2014 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

3EN-81950-00 G&R-30Y-B omron japan 2730D2


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below and for specific information or questions you can reach me at xlch@mail.com. Good luck and have a nice day.
battery not charging The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/269137237-yamaha-fzr600-1989-1999-factory-service-repair-manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.fzrarchives.com/fzr600/600_manual/1999fzr600r.pdf

Apr 16, 2014 | 1995 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

1991 yamaha fzr600 overcharging


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Charging System Test Questions The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/269137237-yamaha-fzr600-1989-1999-factory-service-repair-manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.fzrarchives.com/fzr600/600_manual/1999fzr600r.pdf

Dec 30, 2013 | 1989 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

My fzr 600 won't hold charge.


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
battery not charging The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/2864660-yamaha-fzr-600-service-repair-manual-pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.fzrarchives.com/fzr600/600_manual/1999fzr600r.pdf

Aug 03, 2012 | 1994 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

I have a 1996 fzr 600 , it shut off going down the road , went to start bile. But batt was completely dead , pushed it off it ran for about a mile or two n died , bike is not charging at all could this be...


Hi, Jporzio82 in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
battery not charging The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/2864660-yamaha-fzr-600-service-repair-manual-pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-fz-owners-manuals

Apr 04, 2012 | 1995 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

Low output about 60 vac.


On the bottom right side of the engine there's a throttle with a set screw. This set screw is a fine adjustment for voltage control. The lever should be pushed until the set screw makes contact with the stop plate. Using a voltage meter, adjust the set screw until you hit 110 volt and then lock the set screw. I just bought the same generator, it was putting out 85 volts. Witha phillips screwdriver a wrench and a multi meter, I had 110 volts in less than 2 minutes. It now operates flawlessly.

Jul 14, 2011 | Makita G6100R 5800 Watt Generator

1 Answer

Generator runs but does not generate any electric


hi, what i need u to do for me in order to help u is, get a multi meter and tell me what is the voltage on the live and neutrueal.
should be about 60 volts. let me know.

Jul 11, 2009 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

My Generator is putting out voltage on both the neutral side and positive side of 110 Volt recepticles. When hooking a meter to both sides (Neutral & Positive) it is showing 184 volts! It burnt up a...


Check the voltage with a meter in all the recepticles with your meter leads in the left and right slots on the plugs. Is that 184 volts AC there? If so, your gen has big problems with the voltage regulator. Let me know what you read. You can check the right slot of each plug to the round ground hole on the plug too, should be 120 volts there.

Jul 01, 2009 | Coleman Powermate Proforce 6,000 Watt 12...

3 Answers

Low voltage


Most generators use a flyball type governor within the engine to control rpm; also there is a voltage regulator that tries to maintain voltage at about 115v. The voltage regulator varies the voltage to the armature increasing /adjusting magnetic force. Use a meter with htz or freq setting to adjust engine governor to 60 cycles. When the generator is producing 60 cycles, the engine should be turning 3600 rpm, max power range. At 3600 rpm the voltage should be 115 to 120 volts. Loading the generator will cause governor to try to maintain 3600 rpm. Check engine manual for proper adjustment of gonvernor and linkage. The governor mech should last the life of the engine, however governor system does wear out. Expensive repair. enjoy

Nov 26, 2008 | Yamaha Electrical Supplies

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