Question about Kowa 88mm Angled Spotting Scope

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Have an old TS9 scope with original 20X eyepiece. Suddenly field of view decreased substantially. Placing another eyepiece from a B & L scope the Kowa works fine. How do you check eyepiece or scope?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: I have a Kowa TSN-

hello alexan..... I have first hand knowledge of Kowa and the answer to your question is yes. The company has an east coast service rep. and a west coast rep. Go to the link below to contact one of these service reps.

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Joe

Posted on Apr 22, 2011

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30 year old telescope. do lenses go bad?


General tips
  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away. NEVER THE SUN!
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  8. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  9. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects
Specific:
You can clean the lenses by using a camera brush/puffer. For stains: 1 part distilled water 1 part 97% or better isopropyl alcohol. Use a cotton ball to apply. One stroke per ball. Dry with cotton balls working form the center out.
The eyepieces you have are pretty poor. I suspect they are also 0.965 diameter. If so, go to Ebay and get 2 or 3 MA (modified achromat) or Kelner eyepieces They are very inexpensive.Your H20 (lowest power) is not too bad but very narrow field of view.
If your scope uses 1.25 inch diameter eyepieces, your options are too wide to expound here.
You will get a good, low power view of the moon with the 20mm but the sr4's eye relief (distance your eye has to be to the top of the eyepiece to focus) may make it difficult

Jul 09, 2013 | Swift 860R (175 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I cant view anything from the finderscope in relation to the telescope


They must be lined up, and if you are using a higher power eyepiece, this must be more precise as your field of view is smaller.
There will be some type of adjustment on the finderscope, probably 3 thumbscrews around the holder tube.

Put in a low power eyepiece and point the scope at a local feature such as a streetlight or distant building. Get this centered in the eyepiece. Then adjust the finder only so the feature is centered in the finder as well.

Put in a higher power eyepiece and center the feature again in the telescope EP, and readjust the finder centering by itself, if needed.

Then choose a bright star and by moving the scope mount, place this in the center of the finder. Check if the star is properly centered in the EP as well and if not, move the scope mount until it is. Then finally adjust the finder centering by itself.

Feb 07, 2012 | Celestron Optics

1 Answer

CAN YOU PLEASE TELL ME WHAT IS ITS LENS SIZE,AND ALSO CAN I PURCHASE AN ERECTING EYEPIECE SO THAT I CAN USE THE TELESCOPE FOR TERRESTRIAL VEIWING


The eyepiece size (diameter) is the standard 1.25 in.
Erecting eyepiece adapters can be used with this scope.
maximum magnification is 250x therefore highest eyepiece would be 3.6mm
most useful magnification of any scope is 150x (900/150= 6mm eyepiece
Eyepieces provided with scope (Huygens type) have a narrow field of view and are relatively poor for astronomy but should be fine for terrestrial viewing

Mar 11, 2011 | Tasco Luminova 40114675 (675 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

We cant see anything but black


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 24, 2011 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

Just had a konusmotor 500 telescope and have built it to the instructions, but nothing on how to use. only a beginner but how do you increase the size of the object you are looking at,eg the moon looks the...


Are you viewing the moon through the small finder scope on top of the main tube? That is only used for aiming the scope, and has very little magnification. The moon should fill the field of view on even the lowest magnification on the main scope.

A reflector type scope has the eyepiece mount on the side of the main tube, near the top end, pointing into the side of the scope. This mount should have an eyepiece placed in it- use the one with the biggest number to start with (that will have the least magnification). Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. You look into the side of the tube with this type of scope, not along it.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. This scope has a motor to track the scope and keep objects in view, but you will have to get the scope set up for that for it to work correctly. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece to start. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 22, 2011 | Konusmotor 500 (230 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Cannot see anything in the telescope looks dark


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 09, 2011 | Meade DS-2114 ATS (325 x 114mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I cant see anything through my telescope


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 07, 2011 | Meade 60AZ-M Jupiter Telescope 60mm...

1 Answer

I cannot see anything and what is the finder scope on top for?


New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 06, 2011 | National Geographic 76AZ (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

Need 80mm eyecepie,for swift spotting scope #821.


LARGEST EYEPIECE MAGNIFICATION LENS FOR THE SWIFT 821 IS 60MM. THEY DO NOT MAKE AN 80MM FOR THIS MODEL. THE EYEPIECES ARE INTERCHANGABLE IN 15X, 20X, 30X, 40X, AND LASTLY 60X.

Sep 07, 2009 | Swift Optics

1 Answer

Telescope is only good for viewing moon...help!!!


your scope is 565mm focal length with a 60mm objective which makes it f:9.5. (telescope focal length divided by lens diameter)
all this means that the optics are capable of viewing larger planets. nebula is a bit of a stretch. maybe under exceptionally dark skies with at least 30min. of dark adaptation. brighter objects like m42 or m31 should be visible, bear in mind that only very large telescopes will resolve the slightest hint of color in nebulosity. the rest of us are reserved to gray scale. i would suggest using a 26mm eyepiece plossl if available. next make sure your finding system is aligned to the scope. this is best done during the day at a distant object like a radio tower. center the object in the eyepiece then align the finder.
next get your self a good sky map like stellarium software a freebie and a fav. to ensure your looking at what you think your looking at.

a word on eyepiece selection. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the scope by the focal length of the eyepiece. for instance the scope is 565mm the recommended eyepiece is 26mm so the magnification would be around 22x.
a rule of thumb for optics is about 50x per inch of objective. which means your scope is good for about 100x. so by the math you would use a 5.6mm e.p. to achieve 100x, however as optical powers increase field of view decreases making it difficult to find objects. find your object with a wide field e.p. then switch to a higher power to zoom in. if the image gets fuzzy at high power attempt to refocus, if it doesn't clean up either your asking a bit to much from the scope or seeing conditions in the upper atmosphere may not be ideal. what ever you do don't give up there are some amazing things to see out there.

Nov 23, 2008 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9565 (120 x 60mm)...

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