Question about Rinnai Toyostove Direct Vent Heater: Toyostove Laser 73 Shipping

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Ignition keeps burning out. Also has crusty carbon deposit building up on bottom. Smelly sooty exhaust prior to failure of igniter. Fuel is clean and filter is too. I have a Lazer 73

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I see that you say your fuel is clean but igniter failure is commonly caused by tiny drops of water hitting the hot igniter. A sign of this is small pin holes in the igniter and a pinkish color. You could check the voltage on the ckt board where the igniter connects. I think it is 120vac but I don't have the manual in front of me. Excessive voltage could burn it out alsl. You need to clean the carbon deposits but be careful not to destroy the burner mat. You would have to take the combustion chamber apart to do this. Check you igniter gasket, this could be the cause of the smell. If you can take the top off of the fuel sump, look in there and make sure there is no water contamination. Let me know what you find.

Posted on May 08, 2010

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Flame on main hob of range master 110 is yellow and smelly also black sooty deposit left on jets


Ream out all the orifices and air venturi holes on the burner, adjust the air-ahutter, the air-shutter is usually nearer the valve/knob than to the burner. Yellow flame is an imbalance of fuel to oxygen and is creating Carbon Monoxide and not burning cleanly... this is the same problem that can make a furnace deadly. Blue flame=neutral flame.

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Overheating exaust system 1997 dodge dakota has caused exhaust pipe failure 3 times in past 60 days. Mechanic said unburnt fuel is burning inside pipe and causing failure. True?


I suspect that it is over fuelling and the cat converter is blocking the exhaust
check ignition timing as it is probably too far retarded which causes later spark in relation to the valve timing position where the exhaust valve is opening allowing burning fuel into the exhaust manifold,

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How fix that problem


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Nitrous Oxide NO is created when an engine's combustion chamber temperature reaches over 2500F. 1. Lean Fuel Mixture - Lean fuel mixtures cause high NOx. A lean fuel mixture exists when less fuel then required is delivered to the combustion chambers or when more air then necessary is added to the fuel. In either case the lack of gasoline needed to cool the combustion chambers down is not present. Combustion temperatures increase causing high nitrous oxide emissions. A lean fuel condition may be due to a vacuum leak/s and/or defective fuel control components, such as the Air Flow Meter, Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor, and O2 sensors.
2. Defective EGR System - The Exhaust Gas Recirculation system is designed to reduce NO. The EGR system consists of an EGR valve, EGR pressure sensor, vacuum hoses, and one or more vacuum switching valves or solenoids. newer vehicles may use an electronically controlled EGR valves, which do not require vacuum lines or switching solenoids.
The EGR system's job is to re-route a small amount of exhaust gas back into the intake manifold to help reduce combustion chamber temperatures. As mentioned above NOx is created when combustion chamber temperatures reach above 2500F.
By recirculating exhaust gas back into the intake, a small amount of the air/fuel mixture is replaced with inert gas, reducing combustion temperatures.
3. Defective Catalytic Converter Some vehicles operate without EGR valves. Non-EGR equipped vehicles rely heavily on the Catalytic Converter to assist in the reduction of NO. These vehicles have tendencies to develop CAT problems sooner then those which are equipped. If you own a non-EGR equipped vehicle, and have failed the emissions test for high NOx, pay close attention to the Catalytic Converter.
4. High Engine Mileage - Over an engine's lifetime, carbon build-up develops in the engine's combustion chambers. The more miles on your engine, the more carbon build-up on the pistons, cylinder heads and valves. Carbon build-up decreases the available space for the air/fuel mixture to combust, and causes higher cylinder compression. High compression results in high temperatures and high NOx. Keep in mind this problem is usually seen in vehicles with over 150,000 miles which have been poorly maintained. The solution to this problem is called De-Carbonizing. It will remove a good amount of carbon out of an engine. This will increase combustion space, lower compression and lower NOx.
5. Engine Overheating - Inadequate engine cooling can will high NOx. If your vehicle's cooling system is not working efficiently, high NOx will be created. Remember high NOx nitrous oxide is created when an engine's combustion chamber temperatures reach over 2500F. You will want to make sure your vehicle's cooling system is working properly, and your vehicle's temperature gauge is always indicating normal.

Carbon Monoxide is a by-product of incomplete combustion. Carbon Monoxide exceeding maximum limits, can be due to a number of emission failures ranging from inadequate air intake to defective engine computer sensors. This condition is referred to as a "Rich Fuel Conditon".
1. Dirty Air Filter - The number one overlooked emissions component, yes, "emissions" component is the engine air filter. A dirty air filter will absolutely restrict air flow, thus disturbing the proper 14.7:1 air/fuel ratio required for optimum fuel combustion.
2. Faulty Oxygen Sensor The Oxygen Sensor is responsibly for delivering information to the ECU or ECM relating to the oxygen content in the exhaust stream after it has left the combustion chambers.
The engine control computer will determine how much fuel to inject into the combustion chambers based on this data. The more oxygen in the stream, the more fuel the computer will deliver, and visa-versa. A defective O2 sensor will cause increased carbon monoxide emissions.
3. Defective Manifold Absolute Pressure - The MAP sensor determines the level of vacuum created during an engine's intake stroke, and sends this information to the ECU. During low vacuum the MAP sensor assumes the engine's throttle is in some degree open, meaning you've stepped on the pedal. It relays this information to the ECU. The ECU, in turn, sends commands to the fuel injectors, or carburetor, to increase fuel delivery.
A defective MAP sensor will not report the correct information to the ECU, thus disturbing air/fuel ratio. Usually when the ECU senses a defective MAP sensor it will learn to ignore its data, and rely on preset values, and other sensors such as the Throttle Position Sensor, and Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor; Fuel delivery will not be as accurate and high CO may result.
4.Defective Throttle Position Sensor - Obviously a very important emissions sensor; the TPS relays information regarding the position of the air intake system's throttle plate. The throttle plate, located after the engine air filter and before the intake manifold controls the amount of air entering the combustion chambers. It is usually manipulated by the gas pedal via a cable. On late model vehicles the throttle plate may be controlled electronically. A defective throttle position sensor will confuse the ECU into thinking the vehicle's operator is demanding more or less fuel, when neither is really neccessary. Most often a faulty TPS will cause high CO, as an engine's ECU always prefers to send more fuel rather then less, in an effort to avoid a lean fuel mixture and subsequently higher engine temperatures.5. Defective Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor - Low engine temperature requires more fuel. When the ECU is unable to determine what the engine's accurate temperature is, it will not adjust fuel delivery properly; resulting in high CO. As explained above, the Engine Control Computer prefers to send more fuel rather then less to avoid a lean fuel mixture.

Hydrocarbon HC. Hydrocarbons are basically raw fuel, otherwise known as Gasoline. High Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions are almost always a sign of poor fuel ignition. However, it's not always that the engine's ignition system is responsible for high Hydrocarbon emissions.1. Improper Ignition Timing - Engine ignition timing is measured in degrees before or after Top Dead Center. Example of an ignition timing failure would be in the case where an engine's ignition timing is required to be set at 10 degrees Before Top Dead Center and instead is set to 15 degrees BTDC. This fault will not only cause a smog check "functional failure", but will increase Hyrdocarbon (HC) emissions as well. California allows 3 degrees +/- off of the manufacturer's required setting. Newer vehicle's may not have a distributor, and and no timing adjustment will be needed. On these engines timing is electronically controlled by the ECU.
2. Defective Ignition Components Your vehicle's ignition system consists of the ignition coil/s, distributor, distributor cap, distributor rotor, ignition wires, and spark plugs. If any of these components are defective the engine will produce high hydrocarbons. A common reason ignition components perform poorly is due to carbon build-up. High ignition voltage traveling through the air pockets within these components form carbon. Carbon acts as an insulator between paths of electricity, decreasing the energy required at the spark plug to ignite the air/fuel in the combustion chambers properly.
3. Lean Fuel Mixture - Any condition which will cause unmetered air to enter the intake manifold, and ultimately the combustion chambers, will cause high hydrocarbons (HC). This condition is called a lean miss-fire. Such faults as vacuum leaks and gasket leaks will cause lean fuel/air mixtures. Broken, disconnected or misrouted vacuum hoses will do the same. It is also important to note that many engine components rely on engine vacuum for proper operation. If any of these components are defective, externally or internally, they may cause large vacuum leaks as well.
4. Defective Catalytic Converter - A defective catalytic converter may be responsible for high HC, CO, and NOx emissions. The Catalytic Converter, commonly referred to as the CAT is a component designed to continue the combustion process within itself and emit a more thoroughly burned and less harmful emissions containing exhaust. The most accurate way to find out if your vehicle's CAT is working efficiently is by using an exhaust gas analyzer. Unfortunately this tool is fairly expensive.
Some obvious symptoms of a bad CAT could be any of the following:
a. Major loss of power over 15-25 mph. This may be an indication that the catalytic converter is plugged up and restricting exhaust flow.
b. Strong sulfer or rotten egg smell emitting from the exhaust on an otherwise good running vehicle. This may be an indication that the Catalytic Converter isn't burning fuel completely, instead storing it, then releasing it as hydrogen sulfide.
c. Loud rattle being heard from inside the CAT. This may indicate a broken Catalytic Converter substrate. You may want to insure this sound is not due to loose exhaust components.
5. Defective Air Injection Components - Faulty smog pump and related emissions system components will cause high HC. The air injection system is designed to introduce additional oxygen, after the metering system, to the engine exhaust as it exits the exhaust manifold, or directly before it enters the Catalytic Converter; thus burning whatever remaining fuel (HC) in the exhaust completely.
6. Low Cylinder Compression - This fault is one of the less common high HC causing problems. Reasons an engine may have low or no compression in one or more of its cylinders may include things such as burned intake or exhaust valve/s, defective valve guides and/or seals, defective piston rings, and burned head gasket/s. A wet/dry cylinder compression test will diagnose this fault. More then often if such a problem exists it will be very apparent. You should notice rough idle.

Feb 19, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My petrol stone cutter misfires badly. It starts al-right but then the engine keeps misfiring sending flames out of the exhaust


Is this a 2 cycle engine, I ask because you said fuel mixture was correct. If so 2 cycle engines build up carbon at the exhaust an needs to be cleaned out so often. I have seen the exhaust glow red because of it. This will cause problems. In a 4 cycle engine if the valvues get out of adjustment they run erratic. Can you tell what brand and model engine is

Jan 31, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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94 yz 250 fouling plugs bad


Could be fuel or oil fouling. Need to determine which first off. If it is black sooty fouling it is likely too rich also it too rich may be wet.

If oil fouling it is more likely to be much more material fouling and wet sticky material.

A wet, black and shiny deposit on plug base, electrodes and ceramic insulator tip indicates an oil fouled plug. The condition may be caused by one or more of the following: worn pistons, worn piston rings, worn valves, worn valve guides, worn valve seals, a weak battery or a faulty ignition system.

A dry, fluffy or sooty black deposit indicates an air/fuel mixture that is too rich, engine idling for excessive periods of time and/or enrichener usage for excessive periods of time.

A light brown, glassy deposit indicates an overheated plug. This condition may be accompanied by cracks in the insulator or by erosion of the electrodes and is caused by an air-fuel mixture that is too lean, a hot-running engine, valves not seating or improper ignition timing. The glassy deposit on the spark plug is a conductor when hot and may cause high-speed misfiring. A plug with eroded electrodes, heavy deposits or a cracked insulator must be replaced.

A plug with a white, yellow, tan or rusty brown powdery deposit indicates balanced combustion. Clean off spark plug deposits at regular intervals.

Sep 06, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Excessive emission


Tune ups can radically change emission output due to the burn ratios. By burn ratios I mean the ratio of air, fuel mixture and time/amount of spark. If your burning to much or not enough fuel due to one of the fore mentioned it can cause nasty emissions. Not enough spark causes the ignition of the fuel to be delayed and hence a increase in the amount of fuel burned upon ignition, which increases bad emissions. Exhaust leaks or the catalytic convertor being well used are both culprits also. Exhaust leaks cause particles within normal emissions to solidify within the exhaust (most commonly carbon) then down the line they heat up and burn away into bad emissions. There is always some carbon build up within the exhaust system which is what the catalytic convertor is for. It acts as a filter to scrub away the carbon and other nasty particulates from the exhaust gases. Some of the particulates within will burn up due to normal use and create bad exhaust so when the convertor has a significant build up it needs to be replaced. A plugged catalytic convertor forces the engine to burn exhaust with the air and fuel when mixing which is not a good idea because it retards the engine (definitely bad for the environment and the engine - and the pocket book). I have seen a cheap and seemingly mundane fix work on numerous occasion, simply replace the gas cap. It has to due with the cap making a seal. If it does not seal properly the tank can suck in air during usage which lets more air into the fuel lines when pumped, which in turn increases the air to fuel mixture when sparked. That is always the cheapest fix but keeping up all other things with regular maintenance all really help the environment. Without proper testing it is impossible to guess what the actual culprit is but I hope this has helped both you and the environment.

Mar 24, 2014 | 1993 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera

1 Answer

Accleration, exhaust smoke.


Sounds like you have a fuel-to-air ratio problem causing you to exhaust raw fuel from your exhaust pipe. you could have bad fuel injector, fuel pump, or carborator, if you don't have fuel injection system. Running that way for extended times will fill your engine with carbon deposits that will need to be cleaned up. Also could lead to excelerated piston ring wear. Be sure spark plugs are working properly to insure fuel is igniting. Since spark plugs are ignited via the distributor and ignition coil(s), this system should be check if spark plugs are having irregular ignition. Check timing to insure distributor is working properly. If you have changed gas from premium to regular, this could reduce your engine power, assuming that timing was adjusted to the previous gas. Check owner's manual for proper fuel usage.

Sep 01, 2012 | 1994 Volkswagen Jetta

1 Answer

Whats carbon deposits on valves?


carbon is from the fuel burning. There are additives you can add to your gas to help prevent this from happening or a good blast down the highway putting the gas to the floor and you might see some black smoke coming out of the exhaust thats carbon burning off. Carbon can build up if the car is driven easy all the time. or crappy gas doesnt help either. If the carbon is real bad it can start hanging valves open and make it run like ****.If it gets bad enough no power then would have to remove the valves to clean them.

Apr 22, 2012 | 1991 Ford Mustang

1 Answer

Portable generator backfires


The most common cause of back firing is un-burned gasoline in the cylinder. Make sure your air filter is clean and there are no spider webs in the air-intake manafold. Also, be sure your spark plug is clean (new). Finally, check that the spark plug wire is not damaged/cracked. Each of these can allow excess fuel to exist in the cylinder and cause back firing. This process does not always occur in the cylinder. Fuel can also build up in the muffler and burns/explodes once the muffler gets hot enough (but that is rare on such a small engine with a muffler that gets as hot as your generator should).

Another issue is carbon buildup. This hot soot (carbon) on the piston and cylinder head to store heat from previous combustion cycles of the engine. This carbon eventually gets so hot that it can ignite the fuel/air mixture entering the cylinder BEFORE the spark plug ignites it. Having that fuel mixture explode when the exhaust valve is still closed makes the engine hemmorage and make strage noises once the exhaust valves to open. This is called pre-ignition. It is not as loud as a backfire but it is loud.

In summary, clean your air filter, and air box, and have the carburator adjusted back to factory specs (if anyone tried to turn any screws on the carburator since it was new). If the unit has not been used much, it is likely the air filter. If it has been used heavily, then the soot/carbon build up is likely an issue.

Oct 25, 2011 | Coleman Powermate Premium Plus 6250W...

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Toro LX 425 Backfires when shuting down. Starts and runs GREAT! How to correct before neighbors call cops on me again. (They called i8n the law about how I snow blowed my driveway)


pree ingnition problem.This happens when you get carbon build up in the cylinders on top of pistons.it keeps burning when you turn off the ignition igniting the fuel when the exhaust valve is open.Use a good additive to clean the carbon away And take it for a long run.That should solve it.

Jul 06, 2009 | 2003 Ford E150

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