Question about Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

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Having a clear sky last night i took my new scope out and started to view the night sky, but focusing on a star ! i found that when viewing it at magnification a could clearly see the the area infront of the scope the supports the viewing prism/mirrow and the cross braces that support it, am i trying to view a subject that is "too far" i am VERY new to all this and i am using a celestron 114EQ scope from new any help appreciated Ray

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Stars are ALWAYS pinpoints of light when the scope is focused no matter how much magnification is applied.

You are NOT focused properly -- when you are you cannot see the secondary mirror or the "spider" bracket that holds the mirror.

You will NEVER see a star as a disk, only as a pinpoint light. If you are seeing what looks like a donut with a dark center you are not focused.

Posted on May 07, 2010

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  • Joe Lalumia aka TelescopeMan

    You also should try pointing it at the moon as your first target at night, and also practice focusing on a distant object during the daytime.

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When using telescope for the first time (looking at venus) it would not focus, also the cross at the front of the tube was most prominent.


Do stars appear as small pinpoints in your scope? If not then it sounds like you have not adjusted the focus properly. I recommend you take your telescope outside in the daytime and point it toward a building or tree or hilltop that is somewhat distant from you. The exact distance is not important, but it should a block or more.

With the telescope pointed at the distant object, focus the telescope until the object is sharp and clear. The object might appear upside down -- that's normal for many astronomical telescopes. When you have achieved a sharp focus, leave the focus control alone until you are outside at night under the stars.

The focus should now be fairly close for viewing stars and planets. Small adjustments of the focus control may still be necessary for the sharpest view.

Venus is sometimes a difficult object. It is often fairly low in the sky where the atmosphere is most likely to blur the view. Find a bright star and focus it to a pinpoint, then swing your scope toward Venus.

- Jeff

Dec 27, 2016 | Celestron Optics

1 Answer

I have a T1000HD telescope . I was wondering what I need to do to be able to see planets such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn's rings. Is it just a matter of getting different eyepieces? If so what kind?


That scope came with a 25 mm and a 10 mm eyepiece, which will give about a x40 and a x100 magnification respectively. If the seeing is good (clear sky, not dusty or windy, and the planet not too low (at least 30 deg up from the horizon) you should get a reasonable view of the planets, with these ep's

If you do not have any ep's you could buy 2 or 3 plossl type ep's (nothing more expensive is justified) of say 10 mm, 25 mm, and 32 mm. It looks like it takes ep's with a 1.25" barrel.

The theoretical limiting power of your scope is about x 220, which is about a 4 mm eyepiece, but at that extreme you will find the viewing object is dim, fuzzy, hard to get into the field of view, hard to focus, and totally frustrating.

Sadly this scope is just not a very good one, sorry to sound elitist. One of the issues will be that of collimation (optical alignment). You can never properly focus the scope unless it is collimated. Reflector scopes (with a mirror) all have this difficulty. You can tell if it is collimated with a star test

http://garyseronik.com/no-tools-telescope-collimation/

There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the scope, where the mirror is. These are the collimation screws. Have somebody screw these in and out while you look through the ep. Remember you can only assess the collimation when the defocussed star image is right in the middle of your view.
.

Dec 12, 2016 | Optics

1 Answer

Seeing the stars


The stars will always be "points in the sky" no matter what telescope.
The stars should be sharp, focused points in the center of view (more blurry towards the edges because of the stock eyepieces and the fast telescope mirror) if not, the telescope may need collimation. (look at instructions and/or search online. Plenty of instructions on the net.)
  1. Get Stellarium or another fine astronomy program
  2. During the day, point the telescope at a part of the landscape about 100 yards away.
  3. Use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number) in the focal tube.
  4. Center the landscape object in the telescope.
  5. Align the finder scope so that it points exactly where the main telescope is.
  6. At night, leave the scope out to reach thermal equilibrium (about an hour for small reflectors and refractors)
  7. If the scope is on a EQ mount, polar align.
  8. Point the finder at the moon. The moon should be in the main scope also.
  9. Practice finding the moon before you start on the planets
  10. Once you are comfortable with the moon and planets, you can go for the deep sky objects

Dec 23, 2012 | Optics

1 Answer

Cpc 1100 miracle or fail?i can observe sky objects same size and same quality with my celestron 70 eq and cpc 1100 ? i used different eye pieces but nothing changed.No nebula,no galaxy or better view of...


WRONG-- completely wrong. No way a 70mm scope will show the same as a 11 inch scope. UNLESS you point them to a star. All telescopes show stars as simply a point of light they are TOO far away to see a disk. Objects in the night sky are tiny-- smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length. The scope must be pointed DIRECTLY at them or you will not see anything. What you need is a little bit of knowledge about the night sky--

Download this free software:

www.stellarium.org

download this free monthly star chart:
www.skymaps.com

and located an Astronomy club nearby and the members will help you learn the night sky.


www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.us
www.telescopeman.info

Aug 30, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

I have a meade 40AZ-P telescope How do you set it up to view objects. It shows nothing?


This is really not suitable for viewing objects in the night sky -- except for the moon possibly. It is only 40mm ---- a pair of 10x50mm binoculars has more like gathering power than this small refractor scope.

Just put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the diagonal at the rear of the scope (the focuser) take the scope outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. The moon should be your first target at night. Again this scope is really not suitable for viewing the night sky.



www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.us
www.telescopeman.info

Aug 13, 2011 | Meade EU-40 AZ-P Telescope

1 Answer

Hi ive got a galaxsee tasco telescope but im having trouble seeing anything at night, i've took all the caps off lined up on a star but its just pitch black can you help thanks.


1. During the day, point the scope towards an object and align the finder scope to the telescope.
2. First object at night should be the moon. it will verify your finderscope alignment and you should have a clear view of the moon.
3. Use your lowest power eyepiece (largest number in mm) and point the finderscope to a star. The star should be in the center of the eyepiece.. If not, adjust the finder until it and the scope are centered.
4. You can use your higher power lens on the star nd it should still be in the FOV (field of view)
5. Scope may need to be aligned (collimated). Instructions on this should be included with the scope

Mar 10, 2011 | Tasco Galaxsee 46114375 (375 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Bought the tasco 525 x 60 used and all we see is black. looked up and down for something obvous and can't find it?


Did you try focusing during the day time on a distant object?

Objects in the sky are very tiny, smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length. The scope must be pointed directly at them to see anything----- and your scope also has a VERY small field of view. That's why we recommend binoculars to a beginner. The wider field of view makes it easier to find objects in the sky at night.

Download this free monthly star chart:
http://skymaps.com/downloads.html

Locate a local Astronomy club and attend their star parties and meetings. They will help you.

Read my tips on my profile page for more information.

Sep 02, 2010 | Bushnell Tasco Telescope Galaxsee 525x60mm...

1 Answer

Can not seem to focus when we look through the lens we just see the bk=lack sky we cannot seem to see anything


try this:
see the mini scope on top of the telescope?--that's called the finder scope--
you look through that to see what the telescope is aimed at, just like what a sniper does before he pulls the trigger.

put in the lowest power eyepiece you have in the telescope, the one with a high number on it.

it's a good idea to align the 'finder' with the telescope during the day time--it's much easier.

if your telescope and finder scope aren't aligned properly, aiming your telescope at any target will be off and you'll just get frustrated.
to do this, look through your finder scope and pick a far away target, put in the lowest power eyepiece you have, that's the one with a high number--
high number = low power = a nice big view in the telescope.
low number on eyepiece = high magnification, like a zoom lens.

always use the lowest eyepiece first, then work your way to higher magnification, if you want to get a closer look at your target.

use lowest power eyepiece in telescope--> look through finder scope -->focus the image--> switch to higher power of eyepiece for a closer look at your target.

practice this during the day until you're comfortable, then try it at night.
try the moon, it's a nice big target

you can also use binoculars to check out the night sky.
you can try using 7x35 or 7x50 binoculars.
you see a lot more stars and it gives nice big views of the stars and constellations...and the moon...

hope this helps :D


Jul 30, 2009 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

TASCO TELESCOPE NOVICE 402X POWER REFRACTOR


What eyepiece do you have in the scope when trying to view the sky? (in mm)
I recommend starting out looking at the moon with the largest eyepiece you have (25mm, 20mm etc.). It is an easy target and is very impressive. Stars tend to look pretty much like little points of light in a refractor such as this anyway. Pretty boring.
Try Jupiter after you've got the moon down. You can work your way to Saturn's rings after that.

Jul 04, 2008 | Optics

1 Answer

GoTo Problem


Be sure that the telescope is configured for EQ SOUTH mode to tell it is in the southern hemisphere. Once a star alignment is completed NEVER manually move the telescope. Use only the control panel to slew. Everytime the telescope is move by hand, the motors do not know it has been done, and assume it is still pointing at the old direction. Check the manual for setup.
Here: http://www.celestron.com/c3/images/files/downloads/NexStar_SLT_manual.pdf

Apr 06, 2008 | Celestron NexStar 130 SLT (306 x 130mm)...

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