Question about Dell Latitude E4300 Notebook

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The noise is certainly not coming from the speaker as I have muted it. The noise more like a low frequency noise, I am not able to decide whether it is from the fan or from some other components

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Hi. Check for outside sources that might be causing the static noise. The laptop might be near an Electro-magnetic emitting device like a high-powered lamp or speakers or wireless phones or even a device with a running motor.

^_^

Posted on Jun 05, 2010

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How do I stop feedback through speakers


Well, a feebackback destroyer is oke, or a good equalizer, no cheap noisy one and take one with 31 channeles /channel and lower the trequencies where about where you hear it lower frequency frequency by frequency, until you have the frequency which gives the problem and keep the frequency low in volume . But there are more ways, like replacing you monitors a bit. A low noise graphic equalizer ain't cheap. I thought ART has reasonable anti feedback surpressors....

Oct 07, 2014 | Philips 2.1 Multimedia Speaker System -...

1 Answer

Subwoofer makes noise like an untuned TV regardless of volume knob


I would suggest your crossover unit has failed in the speaker cabinet. The crossover circuit board separates the low and high frequency content of your stereos audio signal. The low frequencies go to the bass unit (woofer) and the high frequencies go to the tweeter speaker. If the capacitor on the crossover goes open or near open circuit then noise is introduced into the sound system. Replace either the capacitor or crossover unit.

Jan 18, 2014 | Cambridge Audio Minx X300 - Powered...

1 Answer

Sansui au-999 static right speaker then blows right speaker fuse


so meaning the right speaker needs a filter which frequency is it normaly u using a certain yf for a certain type of speakers and if you dont the fuse or what ever will go

Apr 15, 2012 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I put a sub in my 2002 Altima but when I turn it up the bass cracks on the door speakers??? What do I do to get all the bass on the sub


Hi Ethan,

What you're looking for is called a "crossover". A crossover is an electronic filter for an audio or speaker circuit. In an audio circuit, a crossover is used to prevent or pass certain frequencies or a range of frequencies from passing through it. Since your sub will reproduce the bass or low frequencies, you don't want other speakers to reproduce them. A band pass filter on your door speakers will do this for you. A band pass filter passes only a range or "band" of frequencies and blocks those that are above and below the range or band of frequencies selected. Installing a band pass filter will prevent the very high & very low frequencies from getting to the door /dash speakers. Likewise, you should consider connecting a low pass filter to your subs, too. The low pass filters work a little differently from of the way band pass filters work - they only allow low frequencies to get to the sub - blocking all the other higher frequencies (your other speakers are better suited to reproduce those). Lastly, you would install a high pass filters on tweeters. Tweeters are designed to reproduce only the high frequencies - sending mid and low frequencies to them is wasting power and can cause damage to them.

You purchase the filters for specific crossover points (the block / unblocked point) as determined by the individual speakers. If a sub has a frequency response of 20Hz - 100Hz, a low pass filter of 100Hz would be ideal. Remaining filters would need to begin at 100Hz - assuming the mid-range speakers have a frequency response beginning at 100Hz. A band pass filter of 100Hz - 3KHz would fit the bill nicely if the mid-range speakers go up to 3Khz Match the high end of the band pass to the high end of the frequency response of the mid-range speakers. Next, a high pass filter at 3KHz would allow only the high frequencies to your tweeters. Basically, you want to have the entire audible range 20Hz - 20KHz covered by the speakers and have the crossover points that match the frequency response ranges of the speakers.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Apr 12, 2012 | Pioneer Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

When playing notes on the A string I get a crackeling noise


Just a thought:

If you used the speakers with another amp and they still make noise when you play certain frequencies, then it is obviously a problem with the speakers or the cabinet - it could be a mechanical resonance in some part of a speaker / cabinet, something like a loose screw or a nut, loose protection mesh on the speakers that resonates at certain frequencies, possibly a bad speaker or a speaker membrane...

Also, you might want to check the pickups on your guitar, see if the pickup core slug under the A string is much closer to the string than the other slugs so it is either picking up too much signal and distorting it or the string might be touching the slug when you play it and cause noise, also see if the string is touching something else when it vibrates...

good luck

3rq8 (Triarcuate)

Sep 08, 2009 | Fender Hot Rod Deluxe Guitar Combo...

1 Answer

Cant get sub to work


It sounds like maybe you need to tell the receiver about the Sub so it will route Low Frequencies there.

Go into Speaker Setup (SP SYS/SETUP Button near upper right side of Op Panel) and follow the prompts.

The parameter we're most interested in is the question "Subwoofer Yes" or "No".

Some guidance when selecting speaker parameters for the rest of the channels:

SMALL vs LARGE: This has nothing to do with size so much as it deals with the BASS handling capacity of the speakers. If you say SMALL, most low frequencies from those channels will be re-routed from them to the Subwoofer. If you say LARGE the channels will still get the low frequencies they deserve.

Even if you have all LARGE speakers defined the Sub will still have work to do as it will be dealt the LFE (Low Frequency Effects) from encoded movies and all or most of the content below certain frequencies.

Apr 08, 2009 | Onkyo TX-DS575 Receiver

1 Answer

Nakamichi AV-10 loud thud from subwoofer


I don't know the design of this reciever, and do not have any schematics or engineering information to know the design.

This is a general comment:
In many of these recievers at this level they don't have very good muting designed in to their system. When switching sources, the audio is not being muted.

This is a theory of why the noise is not on the main speakers, but present on the sub woofer. Because the switching noise is of very low frequency, this is why the sub woofer is making noise. The main speakers lack the low frequency sensitivity that the sub woofer has. This is one way of looking at it. It is also possible that there is muting for the main speakers, and none for the sub woofer.

If the reciever does have muting in to its design that is supposed to mute when switching modes, then there is an obvious defect. When a source is switched, or a mode is changed, the output would mute for the duration of the switching interval. This is usually for a period of about 100 ms.

Your best bet is to contact the service rep for nakamichi and ask the question there.

I have serviced many recievers made by other manufactures. The higher end models all had muting in their design. This way, the output was muted when the source was changed, and when the reciever was turned off or on.


Jerry G.



Apr 23, 2008 | Nakamichi AV-10 Receiver

2 Answers

Annoying buzz!!!


be certain its not your cable providing the noise by being ungrounded .or interference from some other device connected or around tv.
disconnect everything except the cable.
turn off all dimmer lighting around tv. try now.
are you using a cable box, if so bypass ,plug cable directly into tv.
try sound again.
then remove cable and plug in dvd or vcr. and try audio now.
if it continues no matter,
its a warranty repair or just use external speakers ,cable boxes can control the audio to ext speakers.

Mar 26, 2008 | Televison & Video

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