Question about GE DVL223EBWW Electric Dryer

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Heating element it sometimes takes two cycles to dry a small amount of clothes. now the circuit is blown. i unplugged the dryer, reconnected the curcuit, plugged back in the dryer, got a little spark and the curcuit blew again. is the heating element bad

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Yes it shorted out

Posted on May 01, 2010

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Our dryer doesn't dry clothes like it should, sometimes takes a long long time and other times quick and the clothes feel really hot, model # is DLE 2532W


see this causes and fix it. God bless you
Power from the house

Check to see whether there's power getting to the dryer. Is it plugged in? Check for blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers--your dryer uses two fuses or circuit breakers. The dryer could tumble but not heat if only one of the two fuses is blown. If you have circuit breakers, one of the two circuit breakers can trip, even if the two for the dryer are connected.

Heating Element

Often a dryer heating element burns out, but doesn't trip the circuit breaker or blow a fuse. The heating element is simply a long coil of special wire. You can check it for continuity with an ohm meter. No continuity means the element is bad and you need to replace it. The proper ohm reading can be found in the service manual or sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on your dryer (9- 13 ohms is a common reading). Electric heating elements aren't repairable. The heating element is easy to replace. Check our videos for other types of dryer heating elements.

Thermal fuse / Thermal Cut Out / Thermistor

On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel or behind the front cover. The fuse--which is about an inch long--is usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing They are also round and made of metal and plastic. The thermistor is located on the blower housing usually. If any of the fuses do not have continuity replace it. Check for continuity if none replace, But before replacing check for obstructions. The fuses are very inexpensive and easy to replace.

Wiring

A common problem is for the main wiring connection from the house, at the dryer, to burn and break its connection. Because the dryer can still tumble with partial power, the connection may be only partially defective. Check all connections, make sure they are tight. Loose connections can lead to a fire. You may need to replace both the power cord to the dryer and the terminal block inside the dryer that the wire is attached to.

Sep 27, 2012 | LG DLE2532W Electric Dryer

6 Answers

Runs but does not heat up and does not dry. The service man showed me the reset button. It was tripped for him but does not appear tripped now. We have had this problem intermittently for a year. Every...


HI,

If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:


Power from the house Check to see whether there's power getting to the dryer. Is it plugged in? Check for blown fuses or tripped circuit breakers--your dryer uses two fuses or circuit breakers. The dryer could tumble but not heat if only one of the two fuses is blown. If you have circuit breakers, one of the two circuit breakers can trip, even if the two for the dryer are connected.

Heating element Often a dryer heating element burns out, but doesn't trip the circuit breaker or blow a fuse. The heating element is simply a long coil of special wire. You can check it for continuity with an ohm meter. No continuity means the element is bad and you need to replace it--electric heating elements aren't repairable.

Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse--which is about an inch long--is usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing. If the fuse has blown, you need to replace it. (You can't re-set it.)

Wiring A common problem is for the main wiring connection from the house, at the dryer, to burn and break its connection. Because the dryer can still tumble with partial power, the connection may be only partially defective. You may need to replace both the power cord to the dryer and the terminal block inside the dryer that the wire is attached to.

Oct 11, 2008 | Asko Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer takes a long time to dry. How long should an average cycle take?


The normal drying cycle for a normal load of clothes should be around a hour if you dryer is 220 Volts.

Chances are you have a Clogged Vent

If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
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Apr 11, 2011 | Maytag SDE4606A Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer takes forever to dry clothes. now it will not dry clothing


Clogged Vent
If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
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Apr 11, 2011 | Dryers

2 Answers

The dry will not start the display or dig. Controls wont engage anything the start button keeps flashing was just working great


Bad Heating Element
Most clothing dryers heat up and dry clothes with a heating element inside the appliance's body. Maytag dryers are no different and sometimes these heating elements break down or burn out, making the dryer cease to get hot. Make sure the dryer is unplugged and the breakers that run the dryer are switched off before inspecting so you don't electrocute yourself. The heating element is in the bottom panel of the dryer and is often a silver part which heats up when the dryer is on. Sometimes the heating element will be cracked or burned out, which means it is broken. Other times it won't look damaged but may not be working. Replace the heating element if this occurs, to see if this is the main problem.
Broken Motor
Maytag dryers have motors which turn the dryer drum, tossing the clothes so that air and heat can help dry them out completely. When the dryer drum is not turning it means there is something wrong with the motor or that the motor is not getting power. Unplug the dryer and take it apart to inspect the motor. Once you have found the motor, plug the dryer back in and use a meter to see if the motor is getting power. If it is, and isn't working, then there is something wrong with the motor and how it is operating. If the motor isn't getting power, then there is something wrong with the circuits or fuses which disperse power to the motor itself.
Bad Switch
When Maytag dryers won't tumble or heat the clothes which have been put inside of them, this means there could be a number of different things wrong. However, sometimes there's a simple solution to this problem: The switch on the door of the dryer itself may be faulty or not making the electric connection it should to allow the dryer to run. This is a cheap fix and worth troubleshooting before tearing your Maytag dryer apart. Remove the switch and inspect the two leads to make sure they haven't broken or are still transferring electricity. If they aren't you will have to replace the switch

Mar 11, 2011 | Maytag Dryers

1 Answer

The heating element in my Kenmore dryer, model number 110.63032101, does not fully heat up sometimes. With the setting on cotton/high the element will sometimes be fully illuminated and sometimes only...


no,that's how they run,if your clothes are drying and the dryer is cycling on and off,leave it alone,if the clothes are taking a long time to dry clean out the duct that the lint filter slides into and blow out the vent line with a leaf blower if it's a long run

Oct 12, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer has some heat but is taking a long time to dry clothes


This type of problem can be caused by a partially burnt heating element, a blown thermal fuse, or a faulty high limit thermostat. All of these components can be checked using an ohm meter or multimeter. Sure hope this helped and best wishes.

Jul 27, 2009 | Roper REX4634KQ Electric Dryer

3 Answers

Dryer doesn't heat up


Check the following to address this issue.




1. No power to the dryer
Make sure there's power getting to the dryer. Check for tripped circuit breakers or blown fuses. An electric dryer uses two circuit breakers or fuses, and if only one of two is tripped or blown, the dryer might still run but not heat. Sometimes the power cord disconnects or burns at the dryer, if this is the case, the wiring and the terminal block must be repaired or replaced.

2. Heating element
A burned out heating element will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Replace the element if found defective.

3. Thermal fuse
Most dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.

Jul 09, 2009 | Bosch Nexxt WTMC3321US Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Dryer heats up but clothes won't dry


Sounds like to me, that you need to check the vent going outside from the dryer. I had the same problem, and found a birds nest in the dryer vent on the outside of my house restricing air flow. If that doesn't fix the problem, look into a new heating element and or thermostats for the dryers. The old ones could just not be getting hot enough anymore. Good luck.

Apr 08, 2008 | Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Heating element


this could be a partial faulty heater element, a 2 heat element could only be working on 1 element, this can overload the other one causing it to keep switching on and off at the thermostat, sometimes this can be normal but saying as you think its not hot enough, check you have the settings correct on the heater options, i have seen stranger things happen test element contacts for both circuits unplug machine first

Sep 27, 2007 | Hotpoint TDL14 Electric Dryer

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