Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When I look at pics I've taken the sky is always flashing (black, then sky). I know that this shows that the exposure won't work for the sky. Is there any way I can turn that off so that when I review my pics I don't have to see it flashing?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    One Above All:

    The expert with highest point at the last day of the past 12 weeks.

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

  • Nikon Master
  • 102,366 Answers

The best solution in most cases is to reduce the exposure so as to avoid the blown-out highlights. However, if you simply want to get rid of them on the screen, press up/down on the multiselector to select a view you prefer.

Posted on May 01, 2010

Testimonial: "Thank you so much! I did use the up/down and got it to stop...I guess I"ll have to live with all the data at the bottom when I review them. "

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Why does the flash go off before the pic is taken? I have a Blu Dash 5.0+


Some cameras will flicker the flash for focus assist in low light. Some cameras will also do a pre-flash to calculate how much light is needed before the exposure flash.

Feb 27, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

2 pics per press (not always)


well done once again reset,if not select exposure option single exposure instead of continuous.

Mar 09, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I want to take pictures of The Northern Lights. What setting?


Correct, you don't want the flash.

Some cameras have a fireworks mode, Unfortunately, the SD400 doesn't. As far as I can tell, the SD400 doesn't even have a landscape mode, which would have been my second choice.

I'd start by turning off the flash in Auto mode. Unfortunately, the camera is going to try to make the night sky a medium gray. You'll have to reduce the exposure using the exposure compensation feature. Review your pictures and examine the histograms to fine-tune the exposure.

My other approach would be to use the manual mode, reviewing the images and histograms.

Either way, take lots of pictures. Feel free to experiment with various exposures. Remember, there is no "magic bullet." Your sky isn't going to look the same as mine, so my settings won't necessarily do you any good.

Feb 19, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD400 / IXUS 50 Digital...

1 Answer

Black flashing on screen where light is


This allows you to see where your photo is over or under exposed. It helps you see if the exposure is set right.

You can turn it on and off by moving the Up/Down/Left/Right button up or down. This will move you thorough the image data (shutter speed, aperature, file format...etc.). It should show "Highlights" on the screen when you have this selected.

Aug 15, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Pictures are coming out blurry


On digital cameras it is always best to press the button half way down before taking the picture. This helps the camera focus, thus preventing blurry images. Always, always press the button half way down. Secondly, if you are still getting blurry pictures, there is a possiblity that the sensor in your camera is bad. I don't know how old your camera is or how long you've had it, but you would need to send it for repair, exchange it, or if it's under warranty maybe they'll send you a new one.

Jul 05, 2009 | Sony Cybershot DSCW80 7.2MP Digital Camera...

1 Answer

My i85 camera's lcd no longer displays what you are looking at. Just a black screen. All the menu items are there and working. The battery is charged. The power button is working as well as the lens open,...


My i85 camera's lcd no longer displays what you are looking at. Just a black screen. All the menu items are there and working. The battery is charged. The power button is working as well as the lens open, but no image is available just a black screen. When I I try to take pic is showed very low light but doen't show image of pic taken when I check. Please advise. This a brand new camera and was taken excellent pic as of this friday. Groove_us@yahoo.com Mr.Tracy Johnson

Apr 26, 2009 | Samsung i85 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure/shutter release


its the memory buffer. the booklet says that the "r" means remaining. i think the blinking is just the camera saving the pics to the memory card. i think the memory buffer is full and you have to wait for it to finish saving. if you want to be able to take more continuous pics i think you can turn down the quality and it will take more. hope this helps

Feb 18, 2009 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

Time for new flash??


the camera's light sensor or metering system, for correct flash exposure is no longer working, that's why your shots is either black or white (overexposed or underexposed) the flash firing has loose its control because of the defective sensor, it now only depends on the charge current of the flash capacitor. If you'll wait longer time the charge is maximum picture result will be overexposed(white), and vice versa, less charge, dark result, have the flash assy replaced. Daylight no problem, it doesnt use the flash circuitry, thanks

Jul 28, 2007 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-S60 Digital Camera

2 Answers

One of the pictures has a great blue sky but the green tree is very dark and the other one has the green tree and very bright sky?


The two pictures were shot at dramatically different exposures - the "dark" one at 1/1600 shutter speed, f7.3, the "light" one at 1/320 shutter speed, f4.0. This accounts for the great difference, as the exposure conditions for the "light" one allowed much more light into the image during the exposure period. You didn't tell the whole story of how you set this up, I think you were shooting in a "spot" metering mode, where the particular exposure conditions the camera uses would vary considerably whether you were aiming at a dark area (making the picture light) or a light area (making the picture dark). I would make two recommendations: Switch your metering mode to "center weighted" (the mode labeled "[(•)]"), and also change your ISO setting to AUTO, as there would be no reason for shooting these photos at ISO 200 that I can think of.

Sep 04, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

6 Answers

Pictures are too dark


Not enough info given. Is it daytime, inside, outside, sunny, etc etc. Have you read the instruction manual's troubleshoot section? BMW

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-450 Zoom Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Nikon D80 Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

62 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Steve

Level 3 Expert

3287 Answers

Ric Donato

Level 2 Expert

225 Answers

Are you a Nikon Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...