Question about Nikon D100 Digital Camera

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Stuck shutter release button on my D100

A baseball hit my right pointing finger while it was resting on the shutter release button. The baseball broke my finger as well as jammed the shutter release button in the "completely pressed" position. I screwed a small screw into the threads on the D100's shutter release button and pulled the button up, but the switch part inside stayed down.
How much to fix?

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Ouch...

The damage may require parts, but maybe not. If I were doing the work, I would charge in the $50-$60 range , plus parts if needed.

Nikon will likely quote you much higher $200+

You can use the repair service locater here on Fixya to find a repair shop in your area

Posted on Mar 24, 2008

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1 Answer

Pictures are blurry


The most common causes of blurry pictures are not holding the camera still and correctly pressing the shutter release button or using a slow shutter speed.

Let\'s talk about properly holding your camera first. Always hold your camera with both hands. With an SLR such as yours, grip the left side of the camera with your left hand and cradle the camera from underneath with your right hand using you thumb and index fingers to zoom. Hold your arms so that both elbows rest on either side of your chest and brace the top of the camera against your forehead. This forms a rigid triangle of support.

The second thing you must do is properly press the shutter release button. Do not poke the button because you will jerk the camera and that can cause blur. Instead, start to press the button gradually increasing the pressure until the shutter trips. It should trip almost by surprise. This is very similar to how a marksman pulls the trigger on a gun.

Assuming that you are holding your camera correctly, not "punching" your shutter button and your camera is not defective, here are two easy ways to solve your problem. First, you could use the manual exposure mode and keep your shutter speed at 1/500 second or faster. Second, go to the "S" shutter priority mode and set the shutter speed above 1/500 second. Your camera will automatically adjust the f-stop (lens diaphragm opening) and "film speed" for proper exposure. Please let me know if this resolved your problem.

Aug 02, 2014 | Nikon D3100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When we take picture it show picture blurry


The most common causes of blurry pictures are not holding the camera still and correctly pressing the shutter release button or using a slow shutter speed.

Let\'s talk about properly holding your camera first. Always hold your camera with both hands. With an SLR such as yours, grip the left side of the camera with your left hand and cradle the camera from underneath with your right hand using you thumb and index fingers to zoom. Hold your arms so that both elbows rest on either side of your chest and brace the top of the camera against your forehead. This forms a rigid triangle of support.

The second thing you must do is properly press the shutter release button. Do not poke the button because you will jerk the camera and that can cause blur. Instead, start to press the button gradually increasing the pressure until the shutter trips. It should trip almost by surprise. This is very similar to how a marksman pulls the trigger on a gun.

Assuming that you are holding your camera correctly, not "punching" your shutter button and your camera is not defective, here are two easy ways to solve your problem. First, you could use the manual exposure mode and keep your shutter speed at 1/500 second or faster. Second, go to the "S" shutter priority mode and set the shutter speed above 1/500 second. Your camera will automatically adjust the f-stop (lens diaphragm opening) and "film speed" for proper exposure. Please let me know if this resolved your problem.

Aug 02, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Manual setting of focus


Like many point&shoot cameras, the SZ-12 does not have manual focus. The closest you can come is to point the camera at the object your want in focus, press the shutter release button halfway, then frame the photo the way you want it and press the shutter release button the rest of the way.

Dec 16, 2013 | Olympus Camedia Digital Cameras

1 Answer

From the time i hit button and the time the picture actually takes is way to long i miss the pic how can i fix this


This "shutter lag" is a common situation with most compact point&shoot cameras. The camera has to do a lot of work when you press the button, including acquiring focus, metering the exposure, and switching the circuitry from displaying on the screen to recording to memory. More sophisticated (and more expensive) cameras have more hardware to reduce this lag.

You can reduce the shutter lag by anticipating the action. Press the shutter release button halfway to focus and meter. Keep it pressed halfway until the right moment and then press it the rest of the way.

Jun 25, 2012 | Kodak EasyShare C330 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The lag time for the shutter to operate after the shutter release button is released is very long. So long that the camera is really not usable to take pictures of anything that moves in the least. Any...


How long have you had the camera? It just sounds like the camera is in Manual mode or "M" and the shutter speed is set really slow. Try putting it back on automatic, or twist the dial that will increase the shutter speed. You can find the manual on Nikon's website.

Mar 21, 2011 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do I change the shutter speed?


This is "shutter lag," the delay between pressing the shutter release button and the camera actually taking a picture. This is a common situation with many compact cameras. The camera has to focus on the subject, meter the exposure, and switch the circuitry from displaying on the screen to recording the image and saving it in memory. More sophisticated (and expensive) DSLRs eliminate this shutter lag by having more dedicated hardware for this.

With a compact camera, you can reduce the shutter lag by anticipating the shot. Press the shutter release button halfway to focus and meter the exposure. Continue to hold the shutter release button halfway until the right time, then press it the rest of the way.

Jan 17, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SX100 IS Digital Camera

2 Answers

Appears in focus in viewfinder, but isn't


Change your focusing setting to spot focus. Then, focus on your main subject, keep the button half-way pressed while you re-compose the shot and then press it the rest of the way. Does that improve the shot?

Sep 21, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Stuck shutter D100 Nikon


The R06 is the buffer indication, not part of the error. It would appear more work is required. Other components may have failed, or the shutter itself may be bad.

I'm afraid this one is not a DIY. Nikon is pricey on repairs, you may fair better checking the repair service search here on Fixya.

Mar 31, 2008 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Error Code


No, it's not an error. What this display indicates, is the availability of the total number of photos you want to take. If the display says, "r06", then you are in JPEG Mode. If it says "r03", then you are either 1) in RAW Mode, or 2) have your Noise Reduction on (see FAQ #2). As you take a few photos in succession, you will notice the indicator drops by how many photos you took.

Mar 01, 2008 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Timer Help


I was just playing with this myself...
Hit the "FUNC" button and scroll (if necessary) to "Drive Mode"
Scroll right/left to select 10-second, 2-second, or custom timer setting. If custom, hit the "Set" button then select the timer delay and number of shots to take.
Leave the FUNC display on the screen when you hit the shutter release. It begins counting down when you hit the shutter button, so make sure you've got it pointed where you want it (preferably on a tripod, though any stable surface will do in a pinch).

Nov 22, 2007 | Canon PowerShot A510 Digital Camera

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