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How to adhear light fixtures that are all connected to a piece of wood to the wall. Tried screws and they crack the wood..

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Drill pilot holes for the screws first and the wood won't crack. The holes should be slightly smaller than the screw.

Posted on Apr 27, 2010

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Can't get rigid zrr8660 screwgun to sink screw more than half way.


Some screwguns have a torque adjustment that slips when adjusted too light. The strongest setting usually has a symbol of a drill bit. Have you tried putting the screw into another piece of wood? If you are going into a very dense wood you may have to predrill hole.

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Minor Drywall Repairs


<span>It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.<br /><br />For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.<br /><br />The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:<br />1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.<br />2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".<br />5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.<br />5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.<br />5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.<br />6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.<br />7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.<br />8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.<br />9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.<br />Hope that this was helpful.<br />Best regards, --W/D--</span>

on Feb 03, 2011 | Plumbing

1 Answer

Anyone know how to remive outwr glass/woid frame? Keeping inside light fixture oart snd replacing frame with drum shade.


If there's no screws or knobs of some sort it may be all made into one piece in which case the only way might be to cut it off

May 05, 2014 | Home

2 Answers

Hole in kitchen wall. How do I fix it?


First I would cut around the hole using a dry wall knife -I would make it a square. Then get a piece of wood ( 2" high and Then measure the length of the hole if it is 9" then you would need the wood piece to be 11" long.) Insert the wood piece inside the wall (hold on to it) and then drill using dry wall screws from the out side wall into the wood piece you installed. Then cut a piece of dry wall the size of the square you made and insert into the wall then screw into wood piece. Then take some joint compound and spread light over insert dry wall spreading on the old dry wall and let dry and then sand so it is flush with wall.

Apr 18, 2013 | Tools & Hardware - Others

1 Answer

Replacing a light fixture


This is much simpler than it sounds, but if you're a total novice you'll need to read it all.

First, make sure power to fixture is off. Best method is to locate circuit breaker or fuse that controls that fixture's power. At minimum shut off the wall switch to it if there is one.

Next, remove the old fixture. Usually there are two screws or decorative nuts holding the base cover (canopy) on. On ceiling pendant fixtures there may be a retaining ring holding up the canopy, unscrew this ring counterclockwise and the canopy will drop over the support chain, exposing the junction box where the wires are connected.

It is critical at this point that the power is off.

Modern house wiring and fixtures are connected with three wires.
Green or bare copper = ground (earth)
White or grey = neutral
Black, Red, Blue or any other solid color other than green, white or grey = power or hot wire (this is the wire that is controlled by a switch.
For simplicity I will call the three: Green, White and Black.

The next step requires you to carefully pull the wires out of the junction box and isolate the black, white and green wire connections from each other. Make sure the connectors (wire nuts) for each connection are accessible.

Warning: With old or over heated wiring, take extra care not to crack or disturb the insulation(wire covering) on any of the wires. If insulation is crumbling away exposing bare wire, stop and call an electrician! Do not turn the power back on until he has repaired those damaged wires, they could start a fire.

Isolate the connection between the black house wire and black fixture wire. Remove this wire nut. At this point I usually use an electrical tester to double check that the power is off by touching one side to the newly exposed black connection and any grounded metal part nearby.
(Note: some multiple switched (three way) circuits may use a white wire as a power wire. If the black fixture wire is connected to a white house wire, mark that white house wire with black electrical tape for future identification.)
Once you are positive there is no power at the fixture junction box remove the connectors from the white and green wires.

Detach the old fixture and it's mounting bracket.

Re-attach the new fixture using bracket and new connectors that are usually provided. Some brackets have a green ground screw. Wrap the bare ground wire clockwise around that screw and tighten it down leaving enough remaining ground wire to attach to the fixture ground.

If the wires to the new fixtures do not have a 1/2 inch of exposed bare wire at the ends (stripped) you must do so. I use a wire stripping tool but you can do it with a sharp knife being careful not to nick the metal wire.
Once the wire tips are stripped, hold the tips of each color pair together side by side, slip the wire nut over them and twist clockwise until snug. (White to white, black to black etc.)
Take care that the new wire nuts are secure at each connection. Do not over tighten them but insure that they are correctly attached by gently tugging on each wire. When completed the black and white connections should have no exposed bare wire showing.
The Green (bare copper) wire is there for safety and never carries current, hence exposed wire is not an issue on ground wires.

Assemble and attach the new fixture according to instructions in the box.

Pendant ceiling fixtures usually require additional assembly steps including adjusting chain height, looping wires through the chain and slipping retaining nut and canopy over chain prior to connecting. Always follow directions that come with the fixtures.

When in doubt, call a professional. Electricity is dangerous.

Apr 06, 2013 | Dryers

1 Answer

How to wire this fan


The wiring on most paddle / ceiling fans id such:

White = Fan and Light neutral or "common"
Black = Fan line voltage or "hot"
Blue = Light line voltage or "hot"
Green = safety ground

If you are replacing an existing light fixture - be sure to replace the ceiling box with one designed for use with a fan - as per electrical code. If the existing box had only 2 wires (or 3 counting the ground) that connected to the old light fixture and it was controlled from a wall switch, the wiring would be fixture white to ceiling white, fixture black and fixture blue to ceiling black (or red) and fixture green to ceiling bare ground or connected to the metal box. This would power both the fan and light whenever the wall switch was on and the pull chains for each were also on. This is also the preferred wiring for replacement of a pull chain type light fixture (no wall switch present).

If there are other wires in the box that previously were not connected to the old light fixture, using a meter or tester - determine if there is constant power between the ceiling white wire and any of the these other wires (test with the wall switch on and off to be sure). If you do have constant power available, you might consider using the wall switch to control only the light, and using the pull chain to operate the fan (or vice-versa). Simply connect the black (for fan) or the blue (for light) to the "constant power on" wire and that part of the fixture will work by pull chain only - regardless of the wall switch position. If the fan can be shut off by the wall switch, it is very important that the wall switch remain a toggle (or on / off switch), do NOT replace with a dimmer type switch.

If you'd prefer to operate the fan and light completely independently of each other - you can purchase a 3rd party fan & light remote control device for between $30 - $50.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thanks!

Apr 22, 2011 | Aloha Housewares (93645) Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

Fixture for curtainrail wentthroughplasterboardbig hole now help.me fix please


Hi, W/D here.

It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.

For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.

The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:
1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.
2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.
3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.
4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".
5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.
5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.
5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.
6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.
7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.
8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.
9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.
Hope that this was helpful.
Best regards, --W/D--

Feb 03, 2011 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

The holder has fallen off the wall. There appears to be two screws, one that fits into the back of the centre of the wall plate and a small one that fits into the side of the wall plate. I don't think...


Hello Alicia

Most often the wall plate will screw to the wall and then there is a set screw (usually an allen key) to tighten the fixture onto the wall plate. If it is the wall plate that won't stay on the wall then your screw holes are probably stripped. An easy way to fix this is to fill the hole with a wood glue filler available at your local hardware store. Use toothpicks to jam the filler into the hole. You can also use white wood glue and jam glue and toothpicks into the hole. Let it dry overnight and the next day you will be able to screw the plate back onto the wall. If the fixture is falling off the wall plate then the set screw is not being tightened hard enough against the plate to hold it onto the wall. Good luck with the repair.

Jul 17, 2010 | Sonia GENOA COLLECTION TOILET ROLL HOLDER...

1 Answer

I want to put a switch on a existing light that has a power source from the main panel then carrys on to other wall receptacles.i just want the light to go on and off with the switch, not the receptacles.


there is a simple way and a not so simple solution, the simple solution is to take down the light fixture and replace with a pull chain fixture. I would have to know the building type commercial ...residential...is it hard piped and so on. In a residential setting the solution would be to install a piece of 14-2 romex between the fixture and the switch. 14-2 with ground is a flat cable with 3 wires (2 insulated and 1 bare). do not attempt with the power source on. the white insulated wire should be connected to the black wire in the fixture box, the other end of the white wire in your new piece of romex should be attached to one pole of the switch. the black wire in your new piece of romex should be attached to the black wire or gold screw of your fixture and the other end of your wire should be attached to the other pole of your switch. Now the other wire(the bare ground)if not attached will not affect the operation of the switch or light, but it is a safety which should be installed. all grounds should be connected to insure that any faulty wiring will trip the breaker saving anyone from getting shocked.

Dec 21, 2009 | Cooper Industries Cooper Wiring 2158V 3...

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