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Behringer Xenyx 1832 FX mixer - re the GAIN knob controlling the input level for MIC and LINE inputs - this function appears not to work correctly as the knob has to be turned to the right, ie it has to be on Full Gain to get any signal from mics to the powered speakers. Anything less and the mics do not work. Also therefore when at full gain, it sends a distorted signal to powered speakers. Thanks!!

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  • GEOTRONIC Jun 20, 2008

    Yes I have a same problem with Behringer Xenyx 1002FX model. Also during the mic input alignment gain oes to very high suddnly. This situation was highly dangerous for Loudspeaker. This is a design fault of Behringer.

    I have another problem. After warm up 10-15 min. mixer temperature reach to 53 celcius degrees at the bottom side. And I occurs at Mic Inputs2 a pop and click noise with randomize. If I reduce to MİC 2 Level potentiometers ( Not trim potentiometer) problem dissaperas normally. For this reason I bring to seller my mixer for change.

    I am waiting the result.


    Conclusion.

    Behringer is a very famous brand, but I couldn't understand why it has a abnormal problem of new series mixer.


    EMREM from Turkey-Istanbul

    Electronic Enginer


  • Gazzor Nov 30, 2008

    Same problem with my UB2442FX PRO. Low input volume until the last little twist of the trim pot and POW, all the volume you would have expected to get as the pot was rotated, only in the last two degrees of turn.



    It this a design issue, or is my board broken?

  • Anonymous May 01, 2009

    Yes I have same problem with the XENYX 1204FX gain nob on the Mic input need turn to maximum

  • Anonymous Mar 25, 2014

    Same though headphones as well as speakers

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I had exactly the same problem with XENYX 1002FX but the warranty covers this, I had my unit replaced with a new one which does not have the fault.

Posted on Apr 03, 2009

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Can i use karaoke mic in harman avr 245 ?


No. The 245 doesn't have a microphone input. Besides, the speakers for a home surround sound system are a bit too delicate for the distortion levels generated by karaoke.

Here's a $300 speaker (yes, $300 for a single speaker) wrecked from teens doing karaoke. They then bust it more messing around trying to push the tweeter cone together so the crack wouldn't be so noticeable

34422fca-12f6-46ab-87df-98709f7e5ba7.jpg

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To reduce background noise from an audio mixer


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regards
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