Question about Pentax *ist DL Digital Camera

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How do I change the ISO on this camera?

How do I change the ISO settings on this camera?
I am taking indoor staging photos (dark background with stage lighting and screens). What settings do you recommend and how to access the settings.

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Press the Menu button, select the camera icon, then scroll down to Sensitivity to change the ISO setting.

Depending on how close to the stage you are and how long your lens is, I would consider using spot-metering on the performers so as not to let the camera try to make the black background into a medium gray. The metering method is also changed in the shooting menu. Press Menu, select the camera icon, and scroll down.

Anyway you do it, you're probably going to have slow shutter speeds. If you can't use a tripod, consider a monopod. Or clamp the camera to the back of the seat in front of you. Or brace it against a wall or column.

Posted on Apr 26, 2010

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With no other menu open, press the Fn button (beside the LCD screen). The ISO setting is selected by pressing "right" on the directional button. You then select the ISO and press OK.

The other responder mentioned using spot metering. I'd like to suggest looking at the "Link AF Point and AE" and "AE-L with AF Locked" settings in the Custom menu in order to maintain autofocus after using spot metering to set your exposure. Depending on the settings, you could have the ability compose your photo and update the focus after setting your exposure.

Posted on Sep 03, 2010

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Can you help me with the right settings to take great photos in n school hall for example with bad lighting took some photos but all were so dark even with the flash on please i have a fijifilm s2980


First, you need to turn the flash off. Unless you're up on the stage, you're going to be too far away for the flash to do any good.

Set the ISO as high as you can. This will incur digital noise, but usually a noisy photo is better than no photo. Use the Sports setting to get the shutter speed as fast as possible. Even so the shutter speed will be slow so you need to hold the camera steady. If you can't use a tripod, brace the camera against a wall or on the back of a chair or some other such thing.

Even with the above, don't set your hopes too high. Compact and bridge cameras with their smaller sensors will have more problems with low light than digital SLRs with their larger sensors. It's simply physics: smaller sensors gather less light than larger sensors.

Mar 14, 2013 | Fuji FinePix Cameras

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I have a Nikon d200 and need to take sports photos in a basketball court The sport is very fast moving. What should I set the camera to. Lately the photos are dark and or blurry


You want the fastest shutter speed you can get and the largest aperture possible.
If you're close enough and it's allowed, use the flash. The flash will freeze the action. However, it's likely to give you a dark background instead of a blurry background.
If not, use the Aperture Priority mode. Open the lens to its maximum aperture (smallest f/number). This will give you the fastest shutter speed for the existing lighting conditions. The fast shutter speed will freeze the action and the large aperture will blur the background, though the amount of freezing may be limited if the lighting is relatively dark, as in a high school gym.
Be aware that if you're shooting indoors you're going up against the laws of physics. The human eye can adapt much better than any camera. A high school gym will appear light enough once you've been inside for a few minutes, but it is much, much darker than a bright day outdoors.

Apr 28, 2012 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

My Canon 550d is new and right out of the box on full auto indoor pics are dark. If I go to no flash mode they are much brighter. It's like the flash is out of sync. Is it the camera or me?


the flash only covers a certain range and the built in flash has quite a small range. so lets say its dark in the room and you take a shot of a person they probably look really bright but the background is pretty dark, thats pretty normal and its better not to use flash, now in the auto mode without flash it will be using a higher "ISO" number to get you brighter shots indoors. shots may look slightly grainer but it means its brighter and the 550d handles low light pretty well.

in auto mode you have no control over the ISO but put the camera into P mode which is basically auto but with access to more controls which you can override. now next to the shutter button there is an "ISO"button. experiment with the different numbered setting (100 being low 3200 being high) and you will see what I mean

Oct 14, 2010 | Canon EOS 550D Rebel T2i Digital Camera

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After taking pictures it come out blurry


1) Make sure all settings are set to "Auto".
2) The picture button has 2 stages, it takes a little practice, but after a while you can feel them.

The first stage tells the camera you're about to take a photo so get to it, setup the focus and set up the exposure setting.

The second executes the photo.

3) What you have to do is pause between stages 1 and 2 to give the camera a moment to focus properly. Then continue with taking the shot.

4) The other thing which can cause blurred photo's is camera shake, try and hold it as still as you can.

Mar 06, 2010 | Nikon Coolpix S210 Digital Camera

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When I take indoor pictures, the images have become progressivley darker and I have to adjust the white balance to +2 and the flash to almost plus 2 just to get a picture where it used to take great...


Make sure your battery is fully charged. If the battery is not fully charged your flash may not fire at the brightness you need to take a well exposed photo. Also, check your ISO settings. Try taking photos at a higher ISO when the subject is in a dark area. Experiment with the ISO. Good Luck!

Nov 09, 2009 | Sony Alpha DSLR-A100 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Cannot take indoor photos without flash


Hello,

Just as "Wrestling" explained, your camera is operating properly. There simply isn't enough light in the scene that you are trying to photograph. If you're new to photography, it's sometimes hard to remember that the human brain/eye combination is an incredible thing, and no camera can compete with a human being.

What I mean is, there is enough light in your room for your eyes to see detail, but not enough for your camera to 'see' the detail without additional light from your flash. However, there are a couple things you can try.

1. Raise the ISO setting on your camera (check your manual, it's easy). Turn the camera on, press and hold the ISO button (left top of camera) and rotate the main command dial (back of camera, upper left corner). Rotate left or right to lover or raise the ISO number. Watch in the top information panel as the ISO numbers change. Higher ISO numbers mean the camera is more sensative to light; you can take pictures when there is less light available. HOWEVER, there is a trade-off. The higher your ISO number, the more noise/grain your image will have. I think the ISO of the D200 is acceptable for enlargements (8x10's) up to about ISO 640 or 800. I'm very picky, you might find higher ISO settings work fine for your needs, especially if you are not making larger prints. Experiment! remember to change your ISO back to a lower setting when you're done with your low light pictures.

2. Take your camera off the fully automatic "P" mode (where the camera makes all the decisions), and change your shutter speed to a slower speed. The slower shutter speed lets more light into the camera, because the 'eye' (the shutter) is open longer. (Use the "S" mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera selects an appropriate aperature). HOWEVER, there is a trade-off again. The slower your shutter speed the more likely you are to have blurred pictures; your subject will move or your camera will shake. If you're taking pictures of a stationary object or an adult, you can tell the person to sit very still and experiment! As for reducing camera shake, first and foremost, learn to hold the camera properly. I can't stress this enough...it's the biggest reason for blurred photos that I see. learn/practice squeezing the shutter realease, not stabbing it. Then, invest in a lens with the Vibration Reduction feature.


3. Take your camera off of the fully automatic "P" mode and change your aperature. (If you like, you can use the "A" mode where you set the aperature and the camera selects the shutter speed for you). The aperature is how wide open the shutter "eye" opens with each picture. Think of your own eye. In bright sunlight, your pupils close down to small openings, as there is a lot of light available. If you are in a dark room, your pupils open as wide as possible to let as much light into your eye as possible. That's the same way a camera works. So, if you are in a darker room, you need to let more light into the camera...that means a larger aperature. The tricky part to remember is that the LARGEST aperature has the smallest number. That means a 3.5 aperature is a larger opening than an aperature of 16. HOWEVER, once again there is a trade-off, as a larger aperature means you have a smaller depth-of-field; depth of field means the area of your picture that is in focus. I'm sure you've seen landscape photos, where every detail is in sharp focus, the far away mountains and clouds, as well as small rocks and grass or a steam in the forground. That is created by a small aperature with a wide/deep depth of field. Then think of a portrait in a magazine or taken by a studio, where the person is in focus, but the background fades off into a pleasing blur. That's done with a large aperature and a narrow/shallow depth of field.

NOTE: The widest aperature available is determined by your lens, so you can't use all the aperature settings with every lens. Your camera knows this and will only adjust to whatever your lens has available. That's why you might have different settings available with different lenses. Experiment!!

OK, sorry if that was long-winded, but the D-200 is a great camera, yours is operating properly, and I want you to enjoy using it!

Jan 01, 2009 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do i take photos indoors/ what settings do i use?


alexisalejan,

well first how far away from the stage will you be?
will you be using available light or a flash unit?
shutter speed and f-stop depend on the light source and film speed. (iso )
the faster the film the less you have to use flash, the lower the f-stop the less depth of field you have, the kind of flash is important, most flash units are good for only around 20 ft.
i would use a high speed film and not use flash. flash will kill any colored lights. try to keep the f-stop at least f/8 and the shutter speed no less than 1/60 sec. have fun.

Dec 13, 2008 | Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

3 Answers

Dark wiew


is it set to auto? if not i suggest you check the aperture and shutter speed setting :)

Sep 22, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Dance Recital Pictures


try bring a tripod or monopod with you-you can than turn off the image stabilizer if doing this-this will allow the cameras shutter to stay open longer and take in more light. Things to try-turn flash off-use a high speed memory card-change iso and exposure values manuely-use a scene mode or put camera on a or p mode which is shutter or appeture priority and see what changes-must set up early and try different settings-try a external flash to boost your range

Jun 04, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dark picture taking on stage


You need to run it with aperture priority, and have the aperture as wide open as possible (The lower the number the better). You've got the kit lens, which is a notoriously poor performer in low light conditions, you should consider getting one of the Sigma DG lenses.

The other alternative is to get as close up to the stage as possible, and use the smaller lens that would have come with the camera kit. It's a little faster.

Mar 20, 2008 | Cameras

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