Question about Peg Perego John Deere Gator HPX Ride on Toy

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The back right tire is locked up keeping the vehicle from moving, is this a safter feature?

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  • Peg Perego Master
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Does it spin by hand?

Posted on Jun 14, 2012

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Brakes freezing in reverse and back right tire won't move by hand when jacked up


Sounds like you have a stuck caliper, they run $35-50 for the rears on that vehicle, They are not that difficult to replace, just be sure to bleed the brakes well after replacing it and check for leaks. If it has been like this for a long while. I would inspect the brake pads, and rotor while your there and replace them if they are worn.

May 11, 2012 | 1997 Plymouth Voyager

Tip

How to Prevent Hydroplaning While Driving In Rainstorms


The average driver, the one daydreaming, or half asleep, or putting on makeup, or engrossed in NPR, will be taken by surprise when the car suddenly accelerates as it enters into a hydroplane. Yes that's right. It goes faster. And rather fast, mean rather suddenly.

When water settles on roadways, and you come barreling down the highway with limited visibility (hopefully your lights are on), in order for the tires of your vehicle to maintain contact with the road, the tires must displace the water. Like parting the red sea. This task is handled by the tire's treads, if they're not worn. If the treads on the tires are worn, the water will stay right where it is -- as a layer between the wheels of your car and the road. Not good.

When water becomes your new road, the vehicle will "hydroplane". Similar to water skiing but without an engine and a screaming child in the back seat. And that doesn't leave much traction for the tires. The lack of traction between the tires and the road decreases the amount of drag (or resistance) therefore the vehicle gains forward momentum.

Here's how that plays out. You're bee bopping down the road in the rain and hating your boss for making you drive into the office when you could have easily worked from home, and your tires loose contact with the road surface and you and your trusty vehicle go gliding across a sheet of water like an olympic figure skater. If you're lucky, the vehicle will continue moving in the same direction and with the front of the vehicle leading the way. If you're not so lucky, the back of your car will be leading the way.

If this ever happens to you, NEVER, NEVER, step on the brakes. Why? Because stepping on the brakes will prevent the tires from rolling. If the tires aren't rolling, but the vehicle is still moving, then there is no possibility of the tires regaining their traction. With hydroplaning, you have a big hunk of out of control useless mechanical energy parting the waters as it spins along the interstate at high speed. With you in it. Getting dizzy.

What you should do is remove your feet from the gas and the brake pedals. Hold the steering wheel firmly as your vehicle initially picks up speed. Your job at this point is to try and keep the vehicle heading in the same direction as before the hydroplaning began. You do this by turning the wheel ONLY if the car begins to turn first. You want to turn the wheel in the direction the back of the vehicle is moving. Basically, that translates into turning the wheel in the opposite direction of which the car wants to spin. Turn the wheel just enough to compensate for the vehicle wanting to spin/turn. This helps to keep the tires in line with the path of travel.

As the vehicle turns to the left, you turn the wheel to the right. Then as the vehicle changes direction and begins to turn to the right, you turn the wheel to the left. These movements will be large at first, but with each turn they should become smaller and smaller until the vehicle comes to a complete stop, or until the tires regain traction with the road surface.

If the vehicle stops completely before you regain control, you could be facing any direction. If you haven't collided with any other vehicles, calmly and quickly restart the engine if it stopped, and continue driving. Don"t sit there waiting for someone to come crashing into you. If you need to do so, drive your car to the side of the road to regain your composure but do it quickly.

If the vehicle doesn't stop, but instead you gain control, then just keep on going as though nothing happened.

Happy Trails,
Randy

on Nov 20, 2011 | 2006 Toyota MR2 Spyder

Tip

Keep your tires in good lasting shape


Did you ever see the statements in the tire dealer shops stating a specific tire model will last approx. 50-75,000 miles/
This will never happen unless you have your tires rotated every 7500 miles, the front tires wear excessively compared to the rear tires in 90% of the cars/trucks.
Why? Because the front tires in most cases are the drive tires(front wheel drive) causing the front tires to ocasionally spin causing excessive wear and also the front tires are the ones that guide your vehicle down the road, when you turn the steering wheel you are turning the front tires to make the car go in the direction you want thus causing more excessive wear to the front tires, in order to get even wear from front to back tires one must move the front tires to the back tires at 7500 mile intervals, making sure the tires only get rotated to the same side of the car each and every time, if you move a right rear tire to a left front position, severe damage may occur so please keep them same side rotations.
Also have your wheel alignment checked at a tire shop each time you bring it in for a wheel/tire rotation as pot holes, hitting curbs,etc all can effect the way the tires wear if the alignment goes out.

on Jun 06, 2010 | Chevrolet Malibu Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Cannot remove spare tire from undercarriage


Hello, this vehicle has a locking device to keep the spare tire from falling down. you will have to perform these steps to remove spare tire.

  • Turn the folding wrench clockwise to raise the jack until it lifts the secondary latch device under the wheel plate.
  • Keep raising the jack until the compact spare tire stops moving upward and is held firmly in place. This lets you know that the secondary latch has released.
  • Lower the jack by turning the folding wrench counterclockwise. Keep lowering the jack until the compact spare tire is resting on the folding wrench
  • Aug 20, 2011 | 2008 Chevrolet Uplander

    Tip

    The recent rain storms reminded of a driving tip I wanted to share. It's about...


    The recent rain storms reminded of a driving tip I wanted to share. It's about hydroplaning.

    The average driver, the one daydreaming, or half asleep, or putting on makeup, or engrossed in NPR, will be taken by surprise when the car suddenly accelerates as it enters into the hydroplane. Yes that's right. It goes faster. And rather fast…um…I mean rather suddenly.

    When water settles on roadways, and you come barreling down the highway with limited visibility (hopefully your lights are on), in order for the tires of your vehicle to maintain contact with the road, the tires must displace the water. Like parting the red sea. This task is handled by the tire's treads, if they're not worn. If the treads on the tires are worn, the water will stay right where it is -- as a layer between the wheels of your car and the road. Not good.

    When water becomes your new road, the vehicle will “hydroplane”. Similar to water skiing but without an engine and a screaming child in the back seat. And that doesn’t leave much traction for the tires. The lack of traction between the tires and the road decreases the amount of drag (or resistance) therefore the vehicle gains forward momentum.

    Here’s how that plays out. You’re bee bopping’ down the road in the rain and hating your boss for making you drive into the office when you could have easily worked from home, and your tires loose contact with the road surface and you and your trusty vehicle go gliding across a sheet of water like an olympic figure skater. If you’re lucky, the vehicle will continue moving in the same direction and with the front of the vehicle leading the way. If you’re not so lucky, the back of your car will be leading the way, then the front, then the back, then the front, then…

    If this ever happens to you, NEVER, NEVER, step on the brakes. Why? Because stepping on the brakes will prevent the tires from rolling. If the tires aren’t rolling, but the vehicle is still moving, then there is no possibility of the tires regaining their traction. With hydroplaning, you have a big hunk of out of control useless mechanical energy parting the waters as it spins along the interstate at high speed. With you in it. Getting dizzy.

    What you should do is remove your feet from the gas and the brake pedals. Hold the steering wheel firmly as your vehicle initially picks up speed. Your job at this point is to try and keep the vehicle heading in the same direction as before the hydroplaning began. You do this by turning the wheel ONLY if the car begins to turn first. You want to turn the wheel in the direction the back of the vehicle is moving. Basically, that translates into turning the wheel in the opposite direction of which the car wants to spin. Turn the wheel just enough to compensate for the vehicle wanting to spin/turn. This helps to keep the tires in line with the path of travel.

    As the vehicle turns to the left, you turn the wheel to the right. Then as the vehicle changes direction and begins to turn to the right, you turn the wheel to the left. These movements will be large at first, but with each turn they should become smaller and smaller until the vehicle comes to a complete stop, or until the tires regain traction with the road surface.

    If the vehicle stops completely before you regain control, you could be facing any direction. If you haven’t collided with any other vehicles, calmly and quickly restart the engine if it stopped, and continue driving. Don’t sit there waiting for someone to come crashing into you. If you need to do so, drive your car to the side of the road to regain your composure but do it quickly.

    If the vehicle doesn’t stop, but instead you gain control, then just keep on going as though nothing happened.

    Happy Trails,
    Randy

    on May 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

    2 Answers

    Steering loose


    On these vehicles the main thing to look for when you have play in the steering is on the passenger side of the vehicle in front of the right front tire on the frame the idler arm.How to check and see if it is that jack up the right front(passenger)side tire and when it is off the ground put one hand on front of the tire and the other hand on the back of the tire and try to move it back and forth,if it moves a decent amount then look at the idler arm and move the tire back and forth again and if the idler arm moves up and down say about 1/2 and inch replace it and have the front end alignment done afterwards.

    Apr 21, 2010 | 1985 Toyota 4Runner

    2 Answers

    Back right tire is locked


    see if brakes are stuck, take apart and see what is stuck 

    Oct 04, 2009 | 1988 Mazda B2200

    1 Answer

    Wobble front end


    jack one tire up at a time, from the control arm, so the tire is not dangling ro the spring does not extend, then grab the tire with one hand on top and one on the bottom, and wiggle it, if it moves you have a bad ball joint, then grab it with one hand on each side and move it back and forth if it moves you have a bad tie rod end.

    Oct 31, 2008 | 1998 Plymouth Grand Voyager

    1 Answer

    Interior locks


    to set the child locks,on the back doors there should be a peice that you click down,its right on the latch assembly,if you set that to child locks on the only way to open is from the outside,doesnt matter if the vehicle is moving or not

    Jul 07, 2008 | 1992 Cadillac DeVille

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