Question about Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

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Scratched Negatives I've got a KX, so essentially a K1000, that leaves a single, light scratch down the length of the film. The scratch is a little off center, varies in depth along its length, and is on the back of the film. Having inspected and repeatedly cleaned the pressure plate (what else could cause this?) I sourced another, pristine looking pressure plate from a K1000. Well, the problem continues to happen, and I find it especially irritating since this is my carry everywhere camera. Anyone think what else I might look into?

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  • Brycebob Apr 07, 2008

    riless-
      Thanks for your response!
      I had thought the system would inform me via email of responses, but evidently not.
      Well the scratch (es) is on the base side of the film, so it seems like it would have to be the pressure plate it seems like, but the thing is spotless and has been replaced.
      I guess I am about down to taking it off to the mechanic. Pentax no longer sells parts for this model, being made in the mid 1970's only! They no longer service these early models either.

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When you say ''back'' of the film do you mean on the emulsion side or the base side. Base can take light scratches can may desapear in processing..Emulsion side is not forgiving...

Hard to tell..Anything along film path can cause scratches, including the back of the cover, film tension, aperture gate..
Hard to suggest anything precisely other than a good check up by registered Pentax rep.

I once spoted a similar problem by loading a camera with he film wounded backwards. That is emulsion facing the back of the camera and base toward the lens. Emulsion being softer, I found a spot where emusion built up (thus scratching on base side). I did not dare fixing it and sent it for repair for a good clean up.
Under proper lighting, you may also want to remove the lens and carefully look for the scratch in the aperture gate. If you see it, problem is before (feeding side).
Good luck. KX is aging but still a good camera

Posted on Mar 26, 2008

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The flip up switch to rewind the film has fallen off, I have all the original pieces but cannot fit the bar in. How do I take off the rewind lever to fix it?


Perhaps the following site will help you visualize the fixing. I remind you that these film cameras sell for very little now days and can be purchased for a song. see: http://www.slideshare.net/lokerd/pentax-k1000-35mm-slr

Apr 14, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

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I took 4 rolls of film in for development but when I got them back all of them were either very under or overexposed despite taking all the pictures according to the light meter in the viewfinder of my...


Are you looking at the picture as in a print OR are you holding the negative up to the light and looking at it that way. Don't touch the negatives, they should be in a protective sleeve but you can see through it. You should be able to see if the spacing between the frames is messed up and if you have lighter and darker negatives. Looking at a print from an automated one hour service isn't worth the time of day to determine a problem. The Pentax K1000 is the work horse of the century for students learning photography and a lot of them have seen extensive use, also the camera is quite old. What I expect is if the negatives are showing overlapping frames AND the exposure is off sometimes over and other times underexposed then the camera needs service lubrication and adjustment. It's great that the light meter is working but the shutter speed could be off and the advance is skipping giving the overlap. I don't know where you are in this world but in Canada that's a $80.00 to $120.00 fix and have the repair person change the light seals while he/she has it apart.
The Pentax K1000 is still a great camera it's up to you whether or not to spend the money. I can't tell you what to do but I can suggest that if you are going to shoot film you find some place that does it with a little more human touch. Hope this was a help

Jan 24, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

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Rewind my film by accident, how do I unrewind it?


If the film has retracted back into the cassette, you'll need to buy or borrow a film leader retriever to fish it out. The latter is a thin specially shaped piece of spring steel which is slipped into the cassette film slot in total darkness and then engages onto the film leader sprockets, enabling you to pull the film leader out again. They can be a little tricky to use if you haven't done so before. Then just load the film as usual and in total darkness (or with the lens cap on and the viewfinder fully covered) set the camera to 1/1000 shutter speed and the smallest aperture and fire and wind until you're one frame past where you left off to give you a safety margin against overlapping images.

Note that when you get the film processed you need to explain what's happened: if you don't and the negatives are automatically cut, the cutter may slice through the images taken after the film restarts. This is because the automated cutter looks at the first few frames to calibrate where to cut, and then continues this pattern for the entire roll. But the shots taken after the restart are unlikely to follow the exact same spacing. Cheap postal developing and printing companies cannot offer this tailored approach, but any good Mall/supermarket/High St minilab usually can although they may charge a little extra.

Basically, if you have to pay additional processing charges or have to buy a leader retriever, it may well be cheaper to develop and print the film as is and put the mistake down to experience.

I hope that I've assisted you and that you take a moment to rate my reply.

Sep 06, 2010 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How do i know when my battery is dead. Every time my pictures are developed, they come out black. how do i use the exposure meter?


The K1000 is all mechanical, the battery only powers the light meter. So even if the battery is dead, then you should still be getting images even if very over or under-exposed.

If the images are totally black on the negatives, then your shutter is stuck open and massively over-exposing your images. If the images are black on the prints, then the negatives have been unexposed and will be totally clear. The latter problem means that the film has not been exposed at all and is either due to incorrect film loading, faulty film winding, or a shutter which fails to open.

To eliminate the possibility of a shutter fault, hold the camera up to the light with the camera back open and fire the shutter at each setting. You should see light as the shutter opens and from 1s to 1/30s should be able to see and hear the difference at each speed.

To check film loading and advancing correctly, load a film and wind film on (remember this camera needs the film leader to be manually engaged onto the take-up spool). Use the rewind crank (do not press the rewind button) to take up the loose film and take a few shots. You should see the rewind crank turn each time you advance the film if it is correctly loaded and advancing. If not, open the camera back and visually inspect the film. It should be securely engaged into the take up spool. With the back still open, advance the film and take a few shots: the take-up spool should be advancing and the sprocket wheel (just before the spool, it's the wheel which engages the holes at the edge of the film) should also be turning. If it isn't, then the film rewind mechanism is faulty and the camera is behaving as if the rewind button has been pressed. It's usually easy to remove the bottom of the camera to check that the button isn't sticking.

If all checks so far are OK then check the film pressure plate on the inside of the film door. It should be able to give a little when pressure is applied and holds the film firmly in contact with the advance sprocket, if not then one of the seating pins on the flat metal spring may have become dislodged and it's usually easy to reseat it. Clean the plate after touching it as it must be grease-free and spotless.

If you try all this and still have a problem then please add a follow up comment and I'll try to respond asap, but bear in mind that as I'm in the UK I may be in a different time zone to you.

If I've fixed your problem, then please take a moment to rate my answer.

Aug 19, 2010 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

On my pentax k1000 the black fuzz looking stuff


That's the mirror bumper, it softens the blow and cuts the noise as the mirror flips up.

Carefully remove it and then replace it with a new one. You can get it as part of a foam light seal repair kit for your camera; this also ensures that the sticky black goo which used to be foam and which prevents light from getting past the edges of the camera back gets replaced. Light seal kits are very cheap, and if you buy a pre-cut version then it makes a fiddly job a bit easier and potentially less messy. They're widely available on sites like ebay, just search for "k1000 light seals" and check that the kit includes a mirror bumper/buffer.

If you don't get it repaired the fuzz will get everywhere and can also get onto the film surface causing white spots on your photos or black spots on negatives/slides. The debris can also get into your lenses so remove it asap. Gooey foam light seals are even worse as it's both corrosive and abrasive (due to the grit it attracts) and gradually migrates to gum up the works. It can also result in light fogging on your photos (usually seen as red streaks from the top or bottom of the picture). Modern foam seals do not decompose like the old ones did.

I hope that I've helped you, please take a moment to rate my answer.

Mar 02, 2010 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Will no longer recognize 4gb sd cards


F4shsk1

are you sure the camera is a Pentax K1000.
the K1000 is a manual 35mm film camera, the only electronics in it are for the light meter. plus a circuit for the flash connections.

Apr 14, 2009 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Loud grinding noise when I "****" the film.


kyle_walsh,
does this noise happen with film loaded or all the time?
this could be a broken gear or the take-up spool is slipping. with the film door opened advance the lever and check if the take up spool is turning. if not turning then a gear is broken. if the spool is turning then the spool is slipping.
there are no new parts available for the K1000, however some camera repair shops have good used parts that can be used.
the take-up spool was one of the very few weak parts of the K1000, you can make a temp. repair if you want.
on the take-up spool push down lightly on the gear like wheel and rotate the spool you should see a hairline crack under where the film is inserted. check both sides. if you find the crack put a very small amount of super glue on the crack using a tooth pick or similar tool. this works 80% of the time.
if you take or send your K1000 to a camera repair shop get an estimate first.

Feb 23, 2009 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Canon Rebel 35mm - Line down centre


This looks as if the negative has been scratched by the minilab processor. It could be scratched in tha camera but with this camera there are only two places this could happen resulting in this kind of scratch.

One is the film cassette itself, the other is the take-up spool, where the film is wound onto itself. However this would not be likley to create a scratch affecting more than one or two negs.

Colour film has a built in orange filter which compensates for the excess sensitivity of colour papers to blue. If this is scratched away, then more blue get's through which prints yellow.

The processing machine uses sqeegee's to prevent carry-over of chenicals form one bath to another, and damage or contaminaton of any one of these can scratch the negative. This is much more likely during processing, as the emulsion is softer when wet.

Films usually have a protective anti-scratch layer, but the protection is not 100%. Also develelped emulsion is generally harder than undeveloped as the last development stage often contains chemical hardeners designed to give extra protection to the negative.

The reason it may not show on all the prints is simply that these days many colour film is printed by digital scanning. Many scanners can detect scratches by viewing the negative in infrared light. Photographic dyes are transparent to infrared in order to reduce heat absorption from enlarger lamps, so there should be no image visible in infrared, anything that is must be dust or a scratch. The image can them be processed to compensate for the scrathes making them virtually undetectable.

A thin scratch may be filled in by using pixesl just either side of the scratch to fill the scratch in. With a wider scratch, if there is some residual image then the software can use that and nearby unscratched areas as a guide to make an acceptable guess as to what was supposed to be there. If the scratch is too wide and too deep it will just give up. A bodged attempt may end-up worse than the scratch. (Often a skilled touch up artist can make it dissapear, but machines on their own are not that smart yet.)

So the good news is that your camera is unlikely to be at fault.

If this shows on one film or a batch of films processed at the same time, take them back to the processor. (I have done this before and been paid a fair amount of compensation. If they printed them at the same time it should be obvious that the negs were scratched before you took them home.)

On the other hand if this is showing on films processed at the same place over a period of time then don't use them again.

If this is happening no matter where you get the film developed, then you might need to check you camera!

Jan 19, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Scratched negatives; broken tractor drive on two cameras


There doesn't seem to be a pattern with any of the Fuji films (I use Sensia and Velvia, exclusively, and have never had a problem in my Canon EOS). There are reports that the Fuji Pro films will gum up the sprockets in a camera, thanks to an adhesive strip at the end of the roll, but I'm not sure if the regular 400 speed film has the same problem. You might try a thorough cleaning, and see if it is still happening. I'm not surprised that 400 speed comes out a tad dark. Try dropping to 200 speed (I generally won't use anything above 100 speed, unless it is black&while).

Cheers

Nov 10, 2008 | 35mm SLR Cameras

1 Answer

Film not loading properly


The lines could be scratches in the negatives.

Have you looked CLOSELY at your negatives with a magnifier to see if the scratches are on your film?

And when you say "Serviced", do you mean "cleaned" also?

If you have scratched film, then return it to the place you got it serviced/cleaned and let the owner/manager know that you just had it serviced there and it's scratching your negatives.

If you have an automatic camera, this bit below will be of no help.

Assuming that your camera is a manual loader, it may be that you aren't putting enough film into the take up spool for it to catch.

Try putting a little more film into the take up spool when you are loading the camera, and MAKE SURE that the holes in the film LINE UP with the film sprockets.

Then after you close the film door and start advancing your film, look at the film rewind knob, if it isn't turning while you are winding in film, then your film hasn't caught in the take up spool.

Another way to tell if your film is advancing is to shoot a test shot, and then advance the film, and then lightly turn the rewind knob a bit.

You should be able to feel the tension of the film if it is loaded correctly.

Feb 13, 2008 | Nikon FM10 35mm SLR Camera

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