Question about Canon EOS Rebel T2 with 28-90 lens 35mm Film Camera

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F-stop issues when i set the camera to the M setting on the dial, the only thing its letting me adjust is my shutter speed and ISO. I can't find a way to also adjust the aperture setting. I can do everything else, but not that. And if I switch to Av, I can't set my shutter speed.... help!

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See pages 36&37 of the manual.

If you haven't got one, you can download it here.

In M mode...

Turn the selector dial to adjust shutter speed.

Hold down the AV+/- button (top-right of rear screen) and turn selector dial to adjust aperture setting.

As for Av mode, this is perfectly normal that you cannot set the shutter speed. Av mode means that you decide on the aperture setting and the camera (not you!) decides on the correct shutter speed.

Hope this helps,

Matt.

Posted on Mar 21, 2008

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