Question about Insignia IS-LCDTV32 32 in. Television

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Not it Thanks Dan, I checked all solder and caps, everything is good and is showing voltage through one side to the other. Is there anything else it could be? Maybe the backlight inverter or something ? Rodney

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The backlight is usually a flourescent light setup which requires high voltage. i don't know your specific model, but since the sound also varies, itis clearly a voltage problem. Something inside is drawing too much current. All I can suggest is to try and find a pattern of when this occurs. If you can run the set opened up, try using freeze spray to cool down various parts to "repair" it. The part that is sensitive to heat may be the problem.
Good luck.
Dan

Posted on Mar 19, 2008

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PUSH START, SHOWS BLUE LIGHT, SCREEN LIGHTS UP FOR ABOUT 2 SECONDS, THEN GOES BLACK


p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; }a:link { }

Sounds like some bad electrolytic capacitors, it's easily fixed. I highly recommend reading the links at the bottom, it'll give a you a better insight into the problem and solution.

You have 2 or 3 options:

1. If it's under warranty then you could send it back to be fixed, problem is they will likely use the same rubbish brand of capacitors again, but anything else will void the warranty.

2. Pay a tv repairman or similar to fix it for you. They may still use substandard capacitors, so specify what brand you want them to use, this will probably mean waiting longer and possibly paying a little more. This way you know the job should be done right.

3. You could replace them yourself if you're comfortable with a soldering iron, or know someone who is. The capacitors themselves are quite cheap and easy to replace.



Go for the best ones you can get for the job and try to buy from reputable companies, the links below will help you chose but you can't go wrong with Rubycons. Every capacitor manufacturer has several ranges, each having different properties which make some more suitable than others




Always match the values on the original capacitors. You can actually use slightly different values for the capacitance and voltage (uf and v) but never use ones below what the originals are rated at.



The links below will explain this further.



They should look something like this:
drunknmonkey_4.jpg
As you should be able to see, the one on the left is bulging. The blue stripe with the arrow tells you that the lead on that side is the negative, the positive lead should also be longer than the negative one(only on a new cap, old ones will have been trimmed).

Tools needed
-----------------
1. Soldering iron. - preferably with a stand with a sponge in.
2. Solder - there's different types so make sure it's suitable for electronics
3. Phillips screwdriver
4. Flat head screwdriver
5. Wirecutters
6. De-soldering wick, or pump. - definitely recommended but not really essential.


If you haven't already got the tools then it's a good investment, as bad caps cause a lot of faults in all kinds of electronics.


Instructions
--------------
1. Unplug monitor and open case.

2. Identify power board, it should have a lot of electrolytic caps on there and obviously should be connected to where the power lead is attached.

3. Identify the bad caps, they should be bulging and/or leaking, although not always. Note down the three values for each cap (eg 220uf, 16v, 105c) and their approximate dimensions, and get new ones, preferably Rubicon or Panasonic, the link below will help you chose some good ones. If in doubt you could remove them and take them to the shop, but you'll have to remember where each one goes and which way round it was (take pics).

4. Very carefully heat up the contact on one side with the soldering iron, and rock the cap the other way, then do the other side, keep doing this until the cap comes out, if you have a de-soldering wick/pump use it to remove the solder and it should just pop out easily.

4. Replace with new cap, making sure that you observe the polarity and make sure it's securely seated and soldered in. Make sure the solder is neat, tidy and doesn't contact anything else. If there's any solder left in the holes then you'll have to heat it up or remove it before you can get the new cap's leads through. Once done properly trim the leads off so they won't cause any problems.

5. Replace casing and test. If it doesn't work then you'll have been a bit messy with the solder, tidy it up and try it again.

Here's a few links to help you:

Bad caps faq - should have pretty much everything you need to know.
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=425



Hints on soldering.

http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/solder.htm

Feb 07, 2011 | Samsung SyncMaster 931B 19" LCD Monitor

1 Answer

My e-machine monitor turns on when the on button is pushed and shows the image on the screen and then turns off again immediately and won't show the image on the screen until it is turned off and then...


p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; }a:link { }

Sounds like some bad electrolytic capacitors, it's easily fixed. I highly recommend reading the links at the bottom, it'll give a you a better insight into the problem and solution.

You have 2 or 3 options:

1. If it's under warranty then you could send it back to be fixed, problem is they will likely use the same rubbish brand of capacitors again, but anything else will void the warranty.

2. Pay a tv repairman or similar to fix it for you. They may still use substandard capacitors, so specify what brand you want them to use, this will probably mean waiting longer and possibly paying a little more. This way you know the job should be done right.

3. You could replace them yourself if you're comfortable with a soldering iron, or know someone who is. The capacitors themselves are quite cheap and easy to replace.



Go for the best ones you can get for the job and try to buy from reputable companies, the links below will help you chose but you can't go wrong with Rubycons. Every capacitor manufacturer has several ranges, each having different properties which make some more suitable than others




Always match the values on the original capacitors. You can actually use slightly different values for the capacitance and voltage (uf and v) but never use ones below what the originals are rated at.



The links below will explain this further.



They should look something like this:
drunknmonkey_4.jpg
As you should be able to see, the one on the left is bulging. The blue stripe with the arrow tells you that the lead on that side is the negative, the positive lead should also be longer than the negative one(only on a new cap, old ones will have been trimmed).

Tools needed
-----------------
1. Soldering iron. - preferably with a stand with a sponge in.
2. Solder - there's different types so make sure it's suitable for electronics
3. Phillips screwdriver
4. Flat head screwdriver
5. Wirecutters
6. De-soldering wick, or pump. - definitely recommended but not really essential.


If you haven't already got the tools then it's a good investment, as bad caps cause a lot of faults in all kinds of electronics.


Instructions
--------------
1. Unplug monitor and open case.

2. Identify power board, it should have a lot of electrolytic caps on there and obviously should be connected to where the power lead is attached.

3. Identify the bad caps, they should be bulging and/or leaking, although not always. Note down the three values for each cap (eg 220uf, 16v, 105c) and their approximate dimensions, and get new ones, preferably Rubicon or Panasonic, the link below will help you chose some good ones. If in doubt you could remove them and take them to the shop, but you'll have to remember where each one goes and which way round it was (take pics).

4. Very carefully heat up the contact on one side with the soldering iron, and rock the cap the other way, then do the other side, keep doing this until the cap comes out, if you have a de-soldering wick/pump use it to remove the solder and it should just pop out easily.

4. Replace with new cap, making sure that you observe the polarity and make sure it's securely seated and soldered in. Make sure the solder is neat, tidy and doesn't contact anything else. If there's any solder left in the holes then you'll have to heat it up or remove it before you can get the new cap's leads through. Once done properly trim the leads off so they won't cause any problems.

5. Replace casing and test. If it doesn't work then you'll have been a bit messy with the solder, tidy it up and try it again.

Here's a few links to help you:

Bad caps faq - should have pretty much everything you need to know.
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=425



Hints on soldering.

http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/solder.htm

Feb 07, 2011 | E-Machines eMachines Monitor E15T4

1 Answer

Light stays green - display is good for about 1 second then black. Rebooting/ shutting off power doesn't help.


p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; }a:link { }

Sounds like some bad electrolytic capacitors, it's easily fixed. I highly recommend reading the links at the bottom, it'll give a you a better insight into the problem and solution.

You have 2 or 3 options:

1. If it's under warranty then you could send it back to be fixed, problem is they will likely use the same rubbish brand of capacitors again, but anything else will void the warranty.

2. Pay a tv repairman or similar to fix it for you. They may still use substandard capacitors, so specify what brand you want them to use, this will probably mean waiting longer and possibly paying a little more. This way you know the job should be done right.

3. You could replace them yourself if you're comfortable with a soldering iron, or know someone who is. The capacitors themselves are quite cheap and easy to replace.



Go for the best ones you can get for the job and try to buy from reputable companies, the links below will help you chose but you can't go wrong with Rubycons. Every capacitor manufacturer has several ranges, each having different properties which make some more suitable than others




Always match the values on the original capacitors. You can actually use slightly different values for the capacitance and voltage (uf and v) but never use ones below what the originals are rated at.



The links below will explain this further.



They should look something like this:
drunknmonkey_4.jpg
As you should be able to see, the one on the left is bulging. The blue stripe with the arrow tells you that the lead on that side is the negative, the positive lead should also be longer than the negative one.

Tools needed
-----------------
1. Soldering iron. - preferably with a stand with a sponge in.
2. Solder - there's different types so make sure it's suitable for electronics
3. Phillips screwdriver
4. Flat head screwdriver
5. Wirecutters
6. De-soldering wick, or pump. - definitely recommended but not really essential.


If you haven't already got the tools then it's a good investment, as bad caps cause a lot of faults in all kinds of electronics.


Instructions
--------------
1. Unplug monitor and open case.

2. Identify power board, it should have a lot of electrolytic caps on there and obviously should be connected to where the power lead is attached.

3. Identify the bad caps, they should be bulging and/or leaking, although not always. Note down the three values for each cap (eg 220uf, 16v, 105c) and their approximate dimensions, and get new ones, preferably Rubicon or Panasonic, the link below will help you chose some good ones. If in doubt you could remove them and take them to the shop, but you'll have to remember where each one goes and which way round it was (take pics).

4. Very carefully heat up the contact on one side with the soldering iron, and rock the cap the other way, then do the other side, keep doing this until the cap comes out, if you have a de-soldering wick/pump use it to remove the solder and it should just pop out easily.

4. Replace with new cap, making sure that you observe the polarity and make sure it's securely seated and soldered in. Make sure the solder is neat, tidy and doesn't contact anything else. If there's any solder left in the holes then you'll have to heat it up or remove it before you can get the new cap's leads through. Once done properly trim the leads off so they won't cause any problems.

5. Replace casing and test. If it doesn't work then you'll have been a bit messy with the solder, tidy it up and try it again.

Here's a few links to help you:

Bad caps faq - should have pretty much everything you need to know.
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=425



Hints on soldering.

http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/solder.htm

Feb 02, 2011 | IBM ThinkVision L170 17" LCD Monitor

2 Answers

Hai My problem is my HPW1907 monitor. Monitor number is(3CQ8182LT1). When start work in my system is going good but after 15mins or above my monitor suddenly display is gone bur power button light is...


p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; }a:link { }

Sounds like some bad capacitors, probably on the power board. I've had a similar problem with a Dell 17" monitor, a 42" plasma tv and a 37" LED LCD tv, all now fixed and working properly.

If it's under warranty then send it back to be fixed. If not then you have two options.

1. Pay a tv repairman or similar to fix it for you. Probably the most expensive option.

2. You could remove/replace them yourself if you're handy with electronics, or know someone who is. All you need is a soldering iron and a screwdriver. The capacitors themselves are quite cheap and easy to replace

They should look something like this:
drunknmonkey_4.jpg
As you should be able to see, the one on the left is bulging. The blue stripe with the arrow tells you that the lead on that side is the negative, the positive lead should also be longer than the negative one.

Tools needed
-----------------
1. Soldering iron.
2. Solder - not acid core
3. Phillips screwdriver
4. Flat head screwdriver
5. Wirecutters


Instructions
--------------
1. Unplug monitor and open case.

2. Identify power board, it should have a lot of electrolytic caps on there and obviously should be connected to where the power lead is attached.

3. Identify the bad caps, they should be bulging and/or leaking, although not always. Note down the three values for each cap (eg 220uf, 16v, 105c) and their approximate dimensions, and get new ones, preferably Rubicon or Panasonic, the link below will help you chose some good ones. If in doubt you could remove them and take them to the shop, but you'll have to remember where each one goes and which way round it was (take a pic).

4. Very carefully heat up the contacts on one side with the soldering iron, and rock the cap the other way, then do the other side, keep doing this until the cap comes out.

4. Replace with new cap, making sure that you observe the polarity and make sure it's securely seated and soldered in. Make sure the solder is neat, tidy and doesn't contact anything else. If there's any solder left in the holes then you'll have to heat it up or remove it before you can get the new cap's leads through. Once done properly trim the leads off so they won't cause any problems.

5. Replace casing and test. If it doesn't work then you'll have been a bit messy with the solder, tidy it up and try it again.

Here's some links to help you:

Bad caps faq - should have pretty much everything you need to know.
http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=425

Jan 21, 2011 | HP w1907 LCD Monitor

1 Answer

My screen went out completely black.i still have sound but no picture.checked all my connections everything is good..just no pic


You can remove the back and check for bulged electrolytic caps on the power supply, you can also check to see if the power is putting out the right voltage, the the output voltage should be written on the power supply board by the connector. Also look at the inverter for cold solder connections.

Nov 11, 2010 | Vizio VW42LF 42 in. LCD HDTV

2 Answers

Tube tv where the screen is crushed into 2 inches


get a good magnifier and soldering iron
open thw back cover set unplug leave it discharge for a while and flip over the pc board and try to fin any cracked solder on the espescialy on the right side near the hig voltage transformer and near the power
supply and regulator you may find the bad one
hope that will help.//watch for not speel soldering betwen component pin .regards A S
good luck...

May 06, 2010 | Sony KV-36FS100 36" TV

1 Answer

Triple vison


This is a convergence problem that can be as simple as poor solder connections on the pins of the convergence ICs or defective ICs. If you can solder, you may be able to fix this yourself. If you wish to attempt the repair, update this and I'll provide additional details and instructions.

Dan

Feb 09, 2009 | Samsung HCL4715W 47" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Need help urgently!!! GR-D22 not recording. I have a JVC GR-D22 Digital Video Camera (about 3 yr. old). It had been working fine. But recently it did not work anymore. The LCD screen is on, but a black...


There is a good chance that the iris is stuck shut. Try tapping the side of the camera lightly to try and release it. If the camera can show you old pictures that are currently stored correctly, I would suspect the iris.

Dan

Jul 31, 2008 | JVC Cameras

3 Answers

Insignia IS-LCDTV32 Intermit picture and sound


Check for bad solder on convergence module. May have bad stk's. Do not neglect looking for bad solder on dsignal and defl boards. Some TV is very prone to bad solder.

Feb 27, 2008 | Insignia IS-LCDTV32 32 in. Television

3 Answers

Picture problem


Having the same problem, storm the night before? Mabye lighting

Jan 09, 2008 | ViewSonic VA902b 19" Monitor

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