Question about Black & Decker 5700 Powershot Forward Action Stapler

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5700 came with nails how do I use them?

There is no groove where they fit or to keep them in place, is there a special attachement? help thanks

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  • kendeb Mar 28, 2008

    I can not find the tab to release the track to install the nails. is there a picture to look at.

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Check the following link to find a user manual for your product in pdf. Hope this helps and let us know if you need further assistance.

Posted on May 30, 2008

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User manual for arrow powershot 5700 staple gun


Hello, there. Attached is the PowerShot 5700 manual. We could only upload in JPEG format, but if you would like the PDF version, please email us at customercare@arrowfastener.com. When you say "reassemble," do you mean the whole tool or the magazine part? We do not recommend disassembling the PowerShot 5700 completely.
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Jun 24, 2015 | Arrow Tools & Hardware - Others

1 Answer

Flooring


Random-length tongue & groove planks? First step - plan it VERY carefully. Get a floor staper or floor nailer - buy one from Harbor Freight instead of renting one. You\'ll need an air compressor capable of powering the flooring nailer; I find that a 5-gallon 2HP compressor is just about enough.



Also get a miter saw before you start, and a drill motor, and a claw hammer and a "Flooring installation kit" from Harbor Freight (they\'re handy), and it\'s worth doing to get a flooring jack from the same place. You\'ll need a triangular layout square or adjustable square and several pencils.



Be prepared for some heavy carrying. Boxes of flooring are heavy, especially at the end of a long day.



Figure out how many square feet to lay, and add 10% to 20% for waste, depending upon how careful you figure you are. I just laid 2400 square feet of it with only about 1% waste, but I\'m VERY careful.



Buy your flooring and stack the boxes inside the room where you\'ll be laying it down. Leave it there, untouched, for no less than three weeks to acclimate to the humidity in that room - longer is better. You can\'t wait too long.



Also buy at least one roll of red rosin-impregnated flooring paper and get hold of a stapler for it. You\'ll also need plenty of flooring staples/nails.



Plan which orientation the flooring will be laid - it usually runs along the longest walls. Plan which side of the room to start on. Find everything you\'ll need to fit around and figure out how to fit the flooring around those obstructions. Heating pipes, ducts, chimney, etc. Places where one piece will wrap partway around an obstruction will be challenging because you\'ll need to make one or two crosscuts and a short rip between them - I prefer to use a bandsaw for the short rip, but you CAN use a handheld sabre saw.



Prepare the underlayment. Get it VERY CLEAN. Sweep often while you work. OFTEN. Don\'t allow any dirt or sawdust or anything under the flooring.



Staple a strip of rosin paper to the floor along the starting wall. It should reach all the way from one end to the other, and it should have NO WRINKLES. If you tear it (it does tear easily), staple both sides of the tear down flat. Sweep again.



Beginning at the starting wall, lay out enough planks to reach all the way along the room to the other end, leaving enough to cut off - you\'ll need the cut-off scrap to start the next course, so select that last piece with a length such that the cut-off scrap\'s end will not coincide with any joint in the first course; the joints in each course should not be nearer than about 6" from the joints in the preceding course - always always remember that, and select planks religiously with that in mind.



Drill a line of holes along the groove edge of the first course of planks. The holes should barely be big enough to fit a #6 finishing nail; I think a 5/64" drill bit is about the right size. The holes should be about 2" from each end of each plank, and about every 6" along the length of the plank. The holes should be near to the groove edge, about 1/2" from the edge, and angled toward the wall at the bottom - when you drive those nails in, you don\'t want your hammer to hit the wall.



Also drill a matching set of holes along the tongue edge, but these holes will be different. This time, start the hole on top of the TONGUE, where it meets the plank, and angle the drill slightly so the drill bit exits the bottom of the PLANK, not the bottom of the groove. If you just drill through the groove, you\'ll never get the next plank to fit over the tongue.



Now very very carefully lay out the planks for that first course. If this one course isn\'t absolutely straight, the rest of the floor will just get worse from there. Keep the groove edge of the first course 5/8" to 3/4" away from the wall along its full length - you may need to replace existing baseboard to do that. Later, you\'ll hide the gap when you put the baseboard back down.



When you\'re SURE that the first course is laid out straight, drive nails into the groove edge holes to hold it there. Drive them down flush with the hammer, then sink them slightly with a nail set (the right size for #6 nails). When you\'re finished, go back and nail down the tongue edge, too, one nail per drilled hole. Also set those nails with your nail set.



Carefully cut that last plank so that its end is 5/8" to 3/4" from the far wall. Carry the cutoff back to the starting point.



Put away your drill & nails & nailset for a while - you won\'t need them again until you get to the opposite wall (or have an obstruction to deal with). From here for the rest of the floor, you\'ll need the flooring stapler/nailer.



Starting with your cutoff, now select the second coarse of planks. You should be selecting planks from several boxes at the same time; the finish may be slightly different from box to box, and it\'s better to have the differences show up randomly than to have them show up in patches.



Select each plank so that its end doesn\'t coincide with the joints in the first course. Remember, 6" is the closest they should be. Also remember the last plank - cut it again so its cutoff end won\'t coincide with the first (cutoff) plank in this second course - it\'ll be used to start the third course.



When you have your planks selected, this time there\'s no need to drill anything - you\'ll use the flooring stapler/nailer. Connect it to the compressor and carry it and its special mallet to your starting point.



Before you staple/nail, the second course of planks needs to be driven into place against the first course. The plastic block from your "flooring installation kit" is perfect for the task. The groove from each course should completely cover the tongue from the previous course, and all joints should be driven VERY TIGHT before stapling/nailing. Some planks will be slightly curved - you can usually start one end, then drive the other end into place (you may need the flooring jack to help with this) before stapling/nailing it the rest of the way.



If you need to use the flooring jack in the middle of the floor, just nail a short piece of 2x4 to the floor and jack against it. Use scaffold (two heads) nails, so it\'ll be easy to remove.



Drive staples/nails with the flooring stapler/nailer about every 6" along the tongue edge of this course. The tool is built to hook over the tongue edge and drive the staples/nails at an angle so the fasteners won\'t interfere with the fit of the next course of planks. One staple/nail should be about 2" from each end of each plank, 6" (roughly) between staples/nails. Yes, it\'s a LOT of staples/nails when you add them all up - 2000, 3000 per room.



Once in a while a staple/nail won\'t drive correctly. You\'ll need to either break it off or pull it out before driving another. You\'ll need to use your imagination - there are lots of approaches. Dig it out with a screwdriver, grab it with diagonal wire cutters, pull it with fencing pliers, use electrician\'s pliers and a pry bar. Do whatever it takes. Some will simply break off - the steel they use to make \'em gets pretty brittle when you bend it back & forth a couple of times. While you\'re worrying one out, use a putty knife to protect the flooring from your tools.



When you\'ve laid enough courses to get within one plank\'s width from the far edge of your red rosin paper, stop and staple down another course of paper, overlapping the first course by about 4". Do this every time you "run out of paper". The paper will eventually cover the whole floor, under your new plank floor.



Just about the time you staple down that second strip of rosin paper, gather up empty flooring boxes and start putting your tools on them, including the air compressor. When you\'re about halfway across the room, you\'ll move all your tools (including the air compressor) up onto the new flooring, and the cardboard boxes will help protect the nice new floor from damage from your tools.



Continue to work across the room - paper and flooring - until you get so close to the far wall that you\'re in danger of bumping the wall with the flooring stapler/nailer\'s mallet. It WILL leave an AWFUL black mark in the wall. Put an ordinary sock over its rubber pull to help prevent the marks. The last course you can staple/nail with that tool will be the course where you have to really choke up on the mallet to get it into the narrow space between the tool & the wall. Finish that course and put the tool away, turn off the compressor, get them out of the room.



The next course of flooring will need to be drilled & hand-nailed again, this time ONLY along the tongue edge, but otherwise exactly as you drilled the tongue edge of the first course.



The last course will need to be ripped to width (a borrowed or rented table saw is the ideal tool for this purpose) so that it ends up 5/8" to 3/4" from the wall. It\'ll need to be face-nailed along the wall edge - exactly the way you drilled the groove side on the first course, but this time there\'s no groove - only the freshly ripped edge of the plank.

Jun 28, 2014 | Crafts & Hobbies

1 Answer

When I takemy front tire off I cant get it back on as my disc brake will not go into the groove? How do I loosen the groove for th edisc to fit in? I have a specialized crosstrail 2010.


The only loosening mechanism should be the quick release, you should have your bike upside down, and place the wheel aligned into the shocks before you insert the quick release pin and nut.

Apr 10, 2011 | Specialized CrossTrail

1 Answer

Swingline heavy duty stapler wont staple??? staples come out crooked


I'm having the same problem,...... Ugh,.. The stupid lil bendy thing that u put in the groove for the staples that u attach to the spring took me forever to put in place.. And I think it make have gotten out of place when I finally kept it in place long enough to close it,.

Aug 05, 2010 | Black & Decker 5700 Powershot Forward...

2 Answers

MY BELLOW RING came off....How does it go back on? Secondly and where?


If you are referring to the outer bellow clamp that consists of a wire hoop with a small spring, it is installed in a groove along the outer lip of the door bellow after it is seated around the perimeter of the door opening. To reinstall, follow these steps:

1. Install the door boot back over the frame of the door opening. Ensure you fit it snugly all the way around the door.

2. Beginning at the top of the door, start inserting the wire hoop back into the groove. Make sure to wire spring points towards the bottom.

3. As you work your way around the door to the 4 and 8 o'clock positions, you will need to maintain some constant downward pressure while pulling the spring apart in order to snap it back into place.

NOTE: To make it easier, you may want to use a second set of hands to hold the wire hoop in place while doing this as it has the tendency to want to come out of the groove.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

Oct 10, 2009 | Kenmore HE2 Plus Front Load Washer

1 Answer

How to use it with nails? Is there some attachment it needs?


No attachment needed.The nails are inserted just like the staples are. You can only use the nails that are made for it of course. If you look at the front where the staples come out,there should be a little picture of a nail on one side.That is the side the nails go in, heads towards the stapler, just like the staples. The nails will only fit and function from one side of the unit.

Oct 05, 2009 | Black & Decker 5700 Powershot Forward...

2 Answers

Two pieces of my wood laminate flooring came undone and it is in the middle of a 25X25 room is there anyway to fix that with out taking the whole floor apart. one piece is higher than the other so i need...


If you can get the toungue and groove to go back together and force the two pieces back down flat, you might consider nailing it down with a couple of small brads and then setting and filling the nail holes.
Sometimes it is possible to cut part of the tongue off one piece if the tongue is damaged and won't engage smoothly, but leave enough to keep the piece interlocked with its mate. You can cut it with a sharp utility knife by making repeated cuts.
Mask off the finished area adjacent so you don't damage it.
But why did it come up in the first place? Is it installed too tightly in the room, so that expansion due to changes in humidity has caused it to buckle?
You may need to address the underlying cause for any repair you do to last...
I hope this helps to shed a little light on a difficult situation....

Mar 27, 2009 | Air Tools & Compressors

2 Answers

Replacing spring wire on kenmore front loader HE 2


This is often a very tricky process. The easiest way I know how to get the inner spring back in place is to use two sets of hands and work through the door and through the bottom panel as well. Follow these steps:

1. Remove the lower panel under the door.
2. One person reach through the door opening and insert the spring in the bellow groove, starting at the top.
3. Work the spring around to the 3 and 9 o'clock positions and hold in place by keeping your fingers on the spring in the groove.
4. Have a second person, laying on their back, reach through the bottom panel and grab the lower half of the spring on each side with both hands.
5. While the first person holds the upper portion in place, the second person pulls straight down and works the remaining portion of the spring in place.

This is the best way, I have been able to accomplish this. Make sure you use a type of applaince adhesive to reseat the outer portion of the bellow to the door frame if this is the glue on type. If you have questions, or require additional assistance, please let me know.

Jan 14, 2009 | Kenmore HE2 Plus Front Load Washer

2 Answers

BOSCH WASHING MACHINE RETAINING SPRING FOR FRONT DOOR GASKET


This is a two person job. The spring part of the metal ring goes at the 6:00 position (note the groove on the metal part of the machine). Fit the ring into the gasket as much as you can on the hinge side. While one person uses pliers to stretch the spring, another person uses a flat head screwdriver to move the ring into the gasket groove. The trick is to stretch the spring as straight and close to the machine as you can or else the ring pops off and the gasket has to be reset.

Aug 01, 2008 | Bosch 3.81 cu ft WFMC530 1UC Nexxt 500...

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