Question about Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

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Overexposed picture when shot in Auto mode, in bright light picture comes as absolutely overexposed. In less light conditions, picture is good without flash but comes as overexposed again.

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  • Tom-at-dasp Aug 20, 2008

    All pictures, except those in very low light conditions, are extremely over exposed. I set all options to factory settings, with no improvement.

  • alangreenone Aug 22, 2008

    I have a similar problem that has recently appeared. it seems to occur when using the camera at any zoom position other than full wide angle. I am contacting Nikon to ask for support!

  • gregdon Sep 03, 2008

    Same over-exposure in bright light, but ok with flash indoor / low light.

    I am assuming a shutter open fault, and hopefully Nikon UK will clarify.


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My guess is the the EV setting is on the + side and not neutral (0). Either that or Image Adjustment setting is wrong. Check EV by pressing the +/- button (right side near On/Off switch). Hold EV selector and make sure 0.0 is in the display. Let me know if that is not the problem and I'll assist you further.

I hope this helps!
Regards,
CharlieJ

[Please rate this solution, if it helps you.]

Posted on Nov 17, 2008

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