Question about Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR DX Nikkor Lens

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Slight blur shooting variety of subjects

I am consistently getting just slight blurring when shooting a variety of subjects. Most recent was a city skyline (clear day, gray sky) using autofocus. Camera is D80; lens is the above; shutter speed 1/320; aperture is F10; manual exposure; focal length 34mm; distance from subject 1-2 kilometers. The subject was a tall building; background grey sky.

Is there a way that I can test to determine that autofocus is "tuned" correctly?

I am moderately near-sighted and compose with my glasses on. I am also new to this camera and lens. It may well be something I am not doing right but I did not have this problem with my Coolpix 995.

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It is just a possibility but you may have overrode the auto focus. If you accidentally move the focussing ring it disables the auto focus.

Posted on Oct 06, 2008

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Every picture i take of still objects turn out really blurred


How do you hold your camera? Holding it at arms length and viewing the subject through the screen will practically guarantee a blurred image with most cameras. You might get away with it with cameras equipped with Image Stabilization but not compact digitals.
Use the view finder and hold camera firmly against your face. Frame your subject, take a breath in then exhale, stop breathing momentarily and squeeze the button. (Don't forget to start breathing again!) If possible rest your camera on or against a solid object while shooting.

May 18, 2011 | Cameras

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Fujifil FinePix S6500fd: How to focus the subject(blur the background)? Like this: http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs604.ash2/155662_1475615262462_1596139557_31044751_765416_n.jpg


What you are asking about is called depth of field. Boiled down, it means that there is a certain amount of area in an image that is in focus, given the focal length of the lens, the aperture (size of the shutter opening) and some other factors. There's a lot of theory behind it, but you just want to know how to accomplish that creative blur behind the subject, right?

If your camera has the capability to choose the aperture, known as the f-stop, either with a manual mode or an aperture-priority mode, then this is pretty easy. The larger the aperture (size of shutter opening) the smaller the depth of field, which means only a small area is in focus. The aperture, or f-stop, is denoted with numbers like F/2.8 or F/8, etc. The lower the number, the bigger the aperture and the more background blur you will get. There is an inverse relation ship between shutter opening and speed, too. A big opening like F2.8 means a faster shutter speed, versus a small opening like F/22. Every lens is different, so your aperture options will vary.

If your camera does not allow you to choose the aperture, it may still have a "scene" setting you can use. A "portrait" or "night" setting usually has a bigger aperture than, say, a "landscape" setting.

Other factors also contribute to creating background blur. All else being equal, the blur increases as you move closer to the subject or as you zoom in on the subject with a zoom lens. Also, having greater space between the background and your subject increases blur.

So, to maximize background blur and create a shallow depth of field, you want to pick the largest aperture possible (smallest f-stop number), you want to get close to the subject and extend your zoom as much as you can, and you want to maximize the distance between the subject and the start of any background objects. Your success will depend in part on your camera and lenses.

If all else fails, you can also artificially create the background blur in software after the image is taken, but that's another story!

Dec 16, 2010 | Fuji Cameras

1 Answer

Blurred images when subject moves


With a point&shoot camera you don't have much control. You can try to get a faster shutter speed by setting the camera to the sports mode. You can also try raising the ISO, assuming you already haven't, though that will increase the noise.

Other than that, you're just going to have to increase the light, possibly by using the flash.

Jan 11, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-T1 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How can i change the exposure time on my pentax istD digital slr to get motion blur etc.?


OK that was a lame answer up there! If you want to add motion blur to your photographs there are several ways. There are two main motion blurs that can be achieved. One is the background blur to give your subject a fast motion feel while being able to identify your subject, like a race car. The other is subject blur to give a motion effect to your subject. NOW THE FUN PART - Doing it. The first one is the panning technique, set your camera for the proper exposure for your subject, frame your subject, as it passes by shoot and pivot at your waist while following the subject in the viewfinder, avoid up and down movement, with practice you will figure the right exposure and movement to achieve this blur effect. The second is the subject blur, this is simply adjusting your shutter speed and exposure to allow your subject to pass by with the shutter open long enough for it to leave a blurred image.

Oct 04, 2009 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurred subject in middle of photo


I own Rebel XT and Canon 50mm f1.8 MKII lens with plastic mount and noticed many pictures with missed focus, either front or back focusing. Meaning objects slight forward or below the intended subject is in focus. I've sent my body and the lens to Canon for evaluation and thet adjusted my focus sensors on the body. I still have problems and there are many threads related to focusing on this camera with 50mm f1.8 that the sensors on this camera do not do so well with fast lens and prone to missed focus.
Test your camera's focusing ability with a book or magazine where you focus on just one specific line and see if it is truly in focus when you review the picture.

Feb 15, 2009 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

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Canon rebel xsi trying to focus on subject and distort the background


If you want the background to be blurred in a shot, you will need to move closer to the subject, recompose the image, and shoot. Since you're shooting digital, I strongly recommend a lot of practicing shooting at different distances and F-stops to determine what you're looking for.

Pls rate if helpful.
Thanks!

Sep 17, 2008 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Blurry pictures in Sports Mode


Well, Sports Mode is a fully automated mode, which I believe tries to balance the exposure toward faster shutter speeds. An over all dark photo indicates an underexposure. You can adjust for underexposure by dialing in a 1/2 stop or so on your exposure compensation dial.

However, dark AND blurry indicates that you just didn't have enough light. The first thing you want, for that same shooting situation, is some faster film. Go up at least an f-stop or two (eg, if you're shooting with ISO 100 film, try ISO 400).

Pay attention to the shutter speed the camera is setting. If you're stilling still, photographing action, you'll want a pretty fast shutter speed, or you WILL get blurring. I'd recommend at least 1/250th second, faster still if you're trying to freeze motion.

A more advanced technique is to pan with your subject. Follow the subject with the camera, and use a medium to medium fast shutter speed (1/60th-1/250th). You will get some blurring, but if you learn this well, your subject will be pretty clear, and the background will blur... thus including the suggestion of speed in the final photo, rather than something that looks frozen. That can deliver a much more satisfying shot.

I have used Canons for years, but I avoid all of the those special modes, like sports modes. They're really trying to deliver some help, but these are techniques you should learn in any basic photography course.

If you set the camera to Av mode, you can choose the widest aperture available for that lens, which will always get you the fastest possible shutter speed -- thus, the least chance of blurring. If you still blur, you need more light, a lower f-stop number, or faster film.. those are the only cures.

Nov 29, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

4 Answers

P72 face focus blurry background


Hl, I'm not sure what shooting options the P72 has. But, even in Auto you should be able to do this (Auto usually picks a wide aperture). The key is to fill the frame (at least 50%) with your subject. So zoom in and focus on the face and then while 1/2 pressing, zoom back out a little. Then fire away. You should get an in-focus subject and slight blurring of the BG. You have to experiment with this. If you fill the frame too much, you might get such a small depth of field that the subject's nose is in-focus but the eyes aren't.

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P72 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Blurred images with no flash


First, try to get more light, particularly natural light (window); second, try using shutter priority (S mode), setting the shutter speed at not less than 1/50, faster if you are shooting motion/action (check the Properties of the blurred pictures that you've been getting in Camedia software - the shutter speeds are probably too slow because of the low light), and experiment with higher ISO settings (either 200 or Auto, not 400) though there's a trade-off in noise levels.

Sep 11, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-3020 Zoom Digital Camera

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