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96 dodge neon radio not working

1996 dodge neon. factory radio stopped working. installed aftermarket radio. still nothing. according to my voltmeter both units are receiving power, but neither will turn on. all fuses are good (checked and rechecked). suggestions?

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Hello Jim,

Not sure where you are measuring your "good" 12vdc voltage(s) from, as with newer radios there are actually 2 +12vdc voltages you need to have otherwise the radio will not power up?

Also - your main car fuse block fuse for the switched ACC may be bad if you are only hooking up the new radio HOT 12vdc wire to the wrong batt source. I'm not there to actually see what you are or are not doing right or wrong.

Are you measuring it at the fused YELLOW wire lead (as in ALWAYS HOT, or as in connected to BATT 12vdc unswitched power source only), or measuring it at the fused RED (connect to TURN ON +12vdc ACC only), or at both ?? VERY IMPORTANT here.

Big difference and here is why - as both of these fused +12vdc sources have to be connected to the proper voltage source or the radio won't turn on.

The YELLOW fused batt voltage source is always ON, so it can remember your radio's settings in the memory, and also allow power to the CD player part of the radio so so as to be able to accept a CD even with the Ignition switch to the OFF position.

ALSO - that YELLOW unswitched +12vdc wire lead has a FUSED noise FILTER suppressor box (BLACK in color), and there is usually a 250V 5A fast blow fuse inside that marked suppressor box as well. NEVER replace the factory fuses with a higher value, as this will only cause more circuit damage if there is a possible short in that circuit leg.

The RED fused batt voltage source is IGNITION switched so when you leave the radio ON - but turn off the Ignition switch - the power is cut off to the radio so that the batt doesn't run down. Hope this makes sense to you. There is usually an in-line 250V 1A fast blow fuse in that marked fuse holder.

Both fuses have to be good!!

There also has to be a GOOD ground return - as in a good solid connection! Dirty grounds can be a high resistive point, and actually impede current flow to the point where some electronics will not work at all. You can still read a static +12vdc batt voltage, but NO current is going to flow in the circuit. I see it happen all too often esp with dirty batt connectors in the engine compartment.

Seeings your OLD factory radio was some ~12 years old it probably failed from OLD AGE. Possibly?

If it's a higher wattage unit it may have taken out the 5A fuse in the YELLOW +12vdc lead. Again from old age - as when the older the unit gets sometimes it tends to draw more circuit current, as from wear and tear on the CD player part, esp if you play a lot of music CD's in it. Same if it's a Cassette/Radio player combo. Then again - it could still be good, but you are maybe still overlooking a blown fuse like in the "ALWAYS HOT" YELLOW lead??

Chances of getting a 2nd bad after-market radio are pretty slim odds wise. Unless maybe that after-market was bought in a USED condition? If that's the case it too may be bad. You might have bought an AS IS LEMON in that case.

Depending on where you bought the after-market radio from you might want to take it back and have them check out the "possibly defective" radio there at the store. If they can do that there? If it checks out good at the store - then you are definitely doing something wrong at home!

If any + or - wiring leads were reversed in doing your DIY upgrade installation then the 2nd radio is history as well. Very important to NOT reverse polarities!!

These hookup guidelines and hints should help solve the problem, as I can't see anything else other then possibly a bad AMP if you had a really high powered car stereo system. You never said either way??

Hopes this helps?

Best regards,

Frank

Posted on Mar 15, 2008

Hello Jim,

Not sure where you are measuring your "good" 12vdc voltage(s) from, as with newer radios there are actually 2 +12vdc voltages you need to have otherwise the radio will not power up?

Also - your main car fuse block fuse for the switched ACC may be bad if you are only hooking up the new radio HOT 12vdc wire to the wrong batt source. I'm not there to actually see what you are or are not doing right or wrong.

Are you measuring it at the fused YELLOW wire lead (as in ALWAYS HOT, or as in connected to BATT 12vdc unswitched power source only), or measuring it at the fused RED (connect to TURN ON +12vdc ACC only), or at both ?? VERY IMPORTANT here.

Big difference and here is why - as both of these fused +12vdc sources have to be connected to the proper voltage source or the radio won't turn on.

The YELLOW fused batt voltage source is always ON, so it can remember your radio's settings in the memory, and also allow power to the CD player part of the radio so so as to be able to accept a CD even with the Ignition switch to the OFF position.

ALSO - that YELLOW unswitched +12vdc wire lead has a FUSED noise FILTER suppressor box (BLACK in color), and there is usually a 250V 5A fast blow fuse inside that marked suppressor box as well. NEVER replace the factory fuses with a higher value, as this will only cause more circuit damage if there is a possible short in that circuit leg.

The RED fused batt voltage source is IGNITION switched so when you leave the radio ON - but turn off the Ignition switch - the power is cut off to the radio so that the batt doesn't run down. Hope this makes sense to you. There is usually an in-line 250V 1A fast blow fuse in that marked fuse holder.

Both fuses have to be good!!

There also has to be a GOOD ground return - as in a good solid connection! Dirty grounds can be a high resistive point, and actually impede current flow to the point where some electronics will not work at all. You can still read a static +12vdc batt voltage, but NO current is going to flow in the circuit. I see it happen all too often esp with dirty batt connectors in the engine compartment.

Seeings your OLD factory radio was some ~12 years old it probably failed from OLD AGE. Possibly?

If it's a higher wattage unit it may have taken out the 5A fuse in the YELLOW +12vdc lead. Again from old age - as when the older the unit gets sometimes it tends to draw more circuit current, as from wear and tear on the CD player part, esp if you play a lot of music CD's in it. Same if it's a Cassette/Radio player combo. Then again - it could still be good, but you are maybe still overlooking a blown fuse like in the "ALWAYS HOT" YELLOW lead??

Chances of getting a 2nd bad after-market radio are pretty slim odds wise. Unless maybe that after-market was bought in a USED condition? If that's the case it too may be bad. You might have bought an AS IS LEMON in that case.

Depending on where you bought the after-market radio from you might want to take it back and have them check out the "possibly defective" radio there at the store. If they can do that there? If it checks out good at the store - then you are definitely doing something wrong at home!

If any + or - wiring leads were reversed in doing your DIY upgrade installation then the 2nd radio is history as well. Very important to NOT reverse polarities!!

These hookup guidelines and hints should help solve the problem, as I can't see anything else other then possibly a bad AMP if you had a really high powered car stereo system. You never said either way??

Hopes this helps?

Best regards,

Frank

Posted on Mar 15, 2008

Hello Jim,

Not sure where you are measuring your "good" 12vdc voltage(s) from, as with newer radios there are actually 2 +12vdc voltages you need to have otherwise the radio will not power up?

Also - your main car fuse block fuse for the switched ACC may be bad if you are only hooking up the new radio HOT 12vdc wire to the wrong batt source. I'm not there to actually see what you are or are not doing right or wrong.

Are you measuring it at the fused YELLOW wire lead (as in ALWAYS HOT, or as in connected to BATT 12vdc unswitched power source only), or measuring it at the fused RED (connect to TURN ON +12vdc ACC only), or at both ?? VERY IMPORTANT here.

Big difference and here is why - as both of these fused +12vdc sources have to be connected to the proper voltage source or the radio won't turn on.

The YELLOW fused batt voltage source is always ON, so it can remember your radio's settings in the memory, and also allow power to the CD player part of the radio so so as to be able to accept a CD even with the Ignition switch to the OFF position.

ALSO - that YELLOW unswitched +12vdc wire lead has a FUSED noise FILTER suppressor box (BLACK in color), and there is usually a 250V 5A fast blow fuse inside that marked suppressor box as well. NEVER replace the factory fuses with a higher value, as this will only cause more circuit damage if there is a possible short in that circuit leg.

The RED fused batt voltage source is IGNITION switched so when you leave the radio ON - but turn off the Ignition switch - the power is cut off to the radio so that the batt doesn't run down. Hope this makes sense to you. There is usually an in-line 250V 1A fast blow fuse in that marked fuse holder.

Both fuses have to be good!!

There also has to be a GOOD ground return - as in a good solid connection! Dirty grounds can be a high resistive point, and actually impede current flow to the point where some electronics will not work at all. You can still read a static +12vdc batt voltage, but NO current is going to flow in the circuit. I see it happen all too often esp with dirty batt connectors in the engine compartment.

Seeings your OLD factory radio was some ~12 years old it probably failed from OLD AGE. Possibly?

If it's a higher wattage unit it may have taken out the 5A fuse in the YELLOW +12vdc lead. Again from old age - as when the older the unit gets sometimes it tends to draw more circuit current, as from wear and tear on the CD player part, esp if you play a lot of music CD's in it. Same if it's a Cassette/Radio player combo. Then again - it could still be good, but you are maybe still overlooking a blown fuse like in the "ALWAYS HOT" YELLOW lead??

Chances of getting a 2nd bad after-market radio are pretty slim odds wise. Unless maybe that after-market was bought in a USED condition? If that's the case it too may be bad. You might have bought an AS IS LEMON in that case.

Depending on where you bought the after-market radio from you might want to take it back and have them check out the "possibly defective" radio there at the store. If they can do that there? If it checks out good at the store - then you are definitely doing something wrong at home!

If any + or - wiring leads were reversed in doing your DIY upgrade installation then the 2nd radio is history as well. Very important to NOT reverse polarities!!

These hookup guidelines and hints should help solve the problem, as I can't see anything else other then possibly a bad AMP if you had a really high powered car stereo system. You never said either way??

Hopes this helps?

Best regards,

Frank


Posted on Mar 15, 2008

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