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3 Answers

I own a Theta Jade transport with a Pioneer Stable Platter assembly. It has recently started skipping. I contacted Theta and they do not service these units anymore. Is there a source for the pioneer stable platter. Is there a source for the laser assembly or spindle motor assembly? As a last resort, are there parts #'s that I could reference for these psrts. I did contact an aftermarket repair facility that told me if I could find the parts or model or parts # then they might be able to help me out. Thanks, Tom

Posted by on

  • 1 more comment 
  • scifi Mar 11, 2008

    Okay,

    Where can I find the serial #'s for the parts mentioned...laser assembly and spindle motor?

    Your initial answer really doesn't help me because it is obvious to me that I would need a part #.

    Is there any known source for a pioneer stable platter assembly?

    Thanks

  • scifi Mar 11, 2008

    It appears that you can't help me with this issue. Is this correct?

  • scifi Mar 12, 2008

    I have a Theta Jade transport that has started skipping. Yesterday I asked for some help in locating a pioneer stable platter replacedment as it may be the laser assembly or spindle motor that is the issue. I also asked for a source for serial #'s of these components.

    The replies that I received were:

    1) yes, you will need serial #'s
    2) look for the parts at a garage sale
    3) yes, this is an older player and you may not be able to locate parts.

    IMO these are hardly answers to my questions, so I am reposting my questions and hoping for a more appropriate anwswer.

    Thanks,

    Tom

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Yup, even the Gurus are having a tough time with this one :)

Scifi, I read Theta's "Notice For Theta Digital Transport Owner" posted right on the front page of their website. I think that the "lack of parts and proper documentation from our vendors" is aimed squarely at Pioneer and their Stable Platter Transport. I've been looking high and low for any documentation on it, and haven't found anything (except lots of other people asking the same questions...)

I've got one lead from a forum post I ran across:
Dando Electronics in Kansas City, MO is reported to do repairs on Pioneer stable platter transports used in anyone's nameplate product. They have no website, but their phone # is (816) 361-6733.

Maybe they could give you more information about obtaining parts?

Posted on Mar 12, 2008

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Try to open it and check for the voltage rating on the laser assembly transport motor. The skipping is cause by that motor and maybe the transport mechanical parts.
If you post a picture of the assembly with a very good view of the electrical motor and the rest of the parts, I will try to find something for you.

Posted on Mar 12, 2008

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Yes..need the serial number and part number when you get em..

Posted on Mar 11, 2008

  • 1 more comment 
  • Patrick Michaels
    Patrick Michaels Mar 11, 2008

    only in someone's garage, properly.

  • Patrick Michaels
    Patrick Michaels Mar 12, 2008

    it's not that, really. It's an arcane assembly, with little support information. even as a wizard this sort of magique is beyond my capabilites.

    thankya for using fixya

  • Patrick Michaels
    Patrick Michaels Mar 12, 2008

    always your option, senor..thankya for using fixya

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If not locked by a region code,then it needs to clean the lens..
Manually cleaning the lens
To locate the laser lens, look around the door or drawer of the DVD player and you will see a small circular disc, which is often called the turntable or disc platter. Right off the edge of the platter you should see a small clear lens. There are some manufacturers that have had problems with the lens, depending on the age of the unit. In these problem players, moving the unit to a different location, turning the unit upside down, or sometimes even without moving the unit, the lens can become detached from the laser assembly and floats around inside the unit. You can re-glue it back with a little crazy glue, BUT it must be perfectly centered, and without getting any glue on it. So, if you don’t see the plastic lens, but instead see the laser pick-up assembly, look around for the lens inside the unit and glue it back on.
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If the cleaning didn’t help, don’t despair just yet. You can see if there’s a problem elsewhere in the unit by using a few simple tricks and tips.
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The slider mechanism, depending on the age of the unit and the manufacturer, consists of the small chrome rail, a drive motor, a small gear assembly, and (in some units) a small belt that drives the slider unit via the motor. This small belt causes all sorts of problems. If the belt is broken or slipping, it can cause skipping, dropouts, or simply no start up at all. Also, if the belt breaks in the middle of the disc, the drive mechanism gets hair or dirt wrapped up into the gears, or the pick-up assembly doesn’t return to the start position (called home), the unit will (99% of the time) refuse to release the disc, causing it to become stuck inside the unit. There’s a little micro or leaf type switch located at home position that sometimes gets dirty or breaks and, causing this problem also.
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Hope this may help;

Regards,
VOTIT

DON'T TO FORGET TO RATE

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1 Answer

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Manually cleaning the lens
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If the cleaning didn’t help, don’t despair just yet. You can see if there’s a problem elsewhere in the unit by using a few simple tricks and tips.
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The slider mechanism, depending on the age of the unit and the manufacturer, consists of the small chrome rail, a drive motor, a small gear assembly, and (in some units) a small belt that drives the slider unit via the motor. This small belt causes all sorts of problems. If the belt is broken or slipping, it can cause skipping, dropouts, or simply no start up at all. Also, if the belt breaks in the middle of the disc, the drive mechanism gets hair or dirt wrapped up into the gears, or the pick-up assembly doesn’t return to the start position (called home), the unit will (99% of the time) refuse to release the disc, causing it to become stuck inside the unit. There’s a little micro or leaf type switch located at home position that sometimes gets dirty or breaks and, causing this problem also.
If the disc starts to spin slowly and doesn’t come up to speed, the spindle motor that’s attached to the turntable platter is a common problem. There could also be a problem with the spindle motor driver controller IC or the power supply regulator that supplies voltage to the driver IC. If the disc starts to spin and then spins really fast, or stops and starts to spin backwards, your problem is the laser pick-up assembly or the servo control circuit. If you continue to have problems after cleaning and checking the other things listed above, you may have a problem with the player's alignment. Of course, one of the problems you'll face checking alignments on a DVD/CD player is that you’re going to need to use an oscilloscope on most of them. If you have the proper tools and equipment, the first thing to look at is the RF pattern of the unit while its playing. It should be a sharp and clear pattern. If it's dull and smeared, then the laser could be weak.
Also, in these units are very critical alignments called the focus/tracking gains and offsets. When these alignments are off, it can often cause intermittent troubles. As the unit ages and parts change value, so do these alignments, and will need to be checked. In my time as service technician repairing DVD/CD players, 65% of the laser pick-up assembles I have tested were good and only needed a small adjustment. Today's technology makes it unfeasible for a shop to hook up a DVD/CD player, and even some recorders, to their equipment and make these adjustments because of the cost involved.

Hope this may help;

Regards,
VOTIT

DON'T TO FORGET TO RATE

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Manually cleaning the lens
To locate the laser lens, look around the door or drawer of the DVD player and you will see a small circular disc, which is often called the turntable or disc platter. Right off the edge of the platter you should see a small clear lens. There are some manufacturers that have had problems with the lens, depending on the age of the unit. In these problem players, moving the unit to a different location, turning the unit upside down, or sometimes even without moving the unit, the lens can become detached from the laser assembly and floats around inside the unit. You can re-glue it back with a little crazy glue, BUT it must be perfectly centered, and without getting any glue on it. So, if you don’t see the plastic lens, but instead see the laser pick-up assembly, look around for the lens inside the unit and glue it back on.
To clean the lens you must use very little pressure. Take a cotton swab and barely moisten it with plain, non-scented, or oily type alcohol. In a swirling motion, very gently rub the lens until you’ve covered it entirely. Then repeat using the dry end.
If the cleaning didn’t help, don’t despair just yet. You can see if there’s a problem elsewhere in the unit by using a few simple tricks and tips.
First thing you want to see if the unit’s laser is in good working order. This method isn’t foolproof, but most of the time works admirably. When you insert a disc, see if you can look up underneath where the disc sits on the turntable. Observe the laser lens going up and down. If the lens is trying to focus, that’s good! After a few seconds of the lens trying to focus, the platter should start to spin. On almost every CD/DVD unit I've encountered, the unit won't spin unless the laser has properly focused on the surface of the disc. If the unit spins up and and then shuts down, you should check and make sure the laser pick-up assembly slider mechanism is working without any obstructions and that the small chrome rail that it slides on is slightly greased. Don’t go overboard with the grease though, as too much can cause all sorts of problems.
The slider mechanism, depending on the age of the unit and the manufacturer, consists of the small chrome rail, a drive motor, a small gear assembly, and (in some units) a small belt that drives the slider unit via the motor. This small belt causes all sorts of problems. If the belt is broken or slipping, it can cause skipping, dropouts, or simply no start up at all. Also, if the belt breaks in the middle of the disc, the drive mechanism gets hair or dirt wrapped up into the gears, or the pick-up assembly doesn’t return to the start position (called home), the unit will (99% of the time) refuse to release the disc, causing it to become stuck inside the unit. There’s a little micro or leaf type switch located at home position that sometimes gets dirty or breaks and, causing this problem also.
If the disc starts to spin slowly and doesn’t come up to speed, the spindle motor that’s attached to the turntable platter is a common problem. There could also be a problem with the spindle motor driver controller IC or the power supply regulator that supplies voltage to the driver IC. If the disc starts to spin and then spins really fast, or stops and starts to spin backwards, your problem is the laser pick-up assembly or the servo control circuit. If you continue to have problems after cleaning and checking the other things listed above, you may have a problem with the player's alignment. Of course, one of the problems you'll face checking alignments on a DVD/CD player is that you’re going to need to use an oscilloscope on most of them. If you have the proper tools and equipment, the first thing to look at is the RF pattern of the unit while its playing. It should be a sharp and clear pattern. If it's dull and smeared, then the laser could be weak.
Also, in these units are very critical alignments called the focus/tracking gains and offsets. When these alignments are off, it can often cause intermittent troubles. As the unit ages and parts change value, so do these alignments, and will need to be checked. In my time as service technician repairing DVD/CD players, 65% of the laser pick-up assembles I have tested were good and only needed a small adjustment. Today's technology makes it unfeasible for a shop to hook up a DVD/CD player, and even some recorders, to their equipment and make these adjustments because of the cost involved.

Hope this may help;

Regards,
VOTIT

DON'T TO FORGET TO RATE

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1 Answer

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Manually cleaning the lens
To locate the laser lens, look around the door or drawer of the DVD player and you will see a small circular disc, which is often called the turntable or disc platter. Right off the edge of the platter you should see a small clear lens. There are some manufacturers that have had problems with the lens, depending on the age of the unit. In these problem players, moving the unit to a different location, turning the unit upside down, or sometimes even without moving the unit, the lens can become detached from the laser assembly and floats around inside the unit. You can re-glue it back with a little crazy glue, BUT it must be perfectly centered, and without getting any glue on it. So, if you don’t see the plastic lens, but instead see the laser pick-up assembly, look around for the lens inside the unit and glue it back on.
To clean the lens you must use very little pressure. Take a cotton swab and barely moisten it with plain, non-scented, or oily type alcohol. In a swirling motion, very gently rub the lens until you’ve covered it entirely. Then repeat using the dry end.
If the cleaning didn’t help, don’t despair just yet. You can see if there’s a problem elsewhere in the unit by using a few simple tricks and tips.
First thing you want to see if the unit’s laser is in good working order. This method isn’t foolproof, but most of the time works admirably. When you insert a disc, see if you can look up underneath where the disc sits on the turntable. Observe the laser lens going up and down. If the lens is trying to focus, that’s good! After a few seconds of the lens trying to focus, the platter should start to spin. On almost every CD/DVD unit I've encountered, the unit won't spin unless the laser has properly focused on the surface of the disc. If the unit spins up and and then shuts down, you should check and make sure the laser pick-up assembly slider mechanism is working without any obstructions and that the small chrome rail that it slides on is slightly greased. Don’t go overboard with the grease though, as too much can cause all sorts of problems.
The slider mechanism, depending on the age of the unit and the manufacturer, consists of the small chrome rail, a drive motor, a small gear assembly, and (in some units) a small belt that drives the slider unit via the motor. This small belt causes all sorts of problems. If the belt is broken or slipping, it can cause skipping, dropouts, or simply no start up at all. Also, if the belt breaks in the middle of the disc, the drive mechanism gets hair or dirt wrapped up into the gears, or the pick-up assembly doesn’t return to the start position (called home), the unit will (99% of the time) refuse to release the disc, causing it to become stuck inside the unit. There’s a little micro or leaf type switch located at home position that sometimes gets dirty or breaks and, causing this problem also.
If the disc starts to spin slowly and doesn’t come up to speed, the spindle motor that’s attached to the turntable platter is a common problem. There could also be a problem with the spindle motor driver controller IC or the power supply regulator that supplies voltage to the driver IC. If the disc starts to spin and then spins really fast, or stops and starts to spin backwards, your problem is the laser pick-up assembly or the servo control circuit. If you continue to have problems after cleaning and checking the other things listed above, you may have a problem with the player's alignment. Of course, one of the problems you'll face checking alignments on a DVD/CD player is that you’re going to need to use an oscilloscope on most of them. If you have the proper tools and equipment, the first thing to look at is the RF pattern of the unit while its playing. It should be a sharp and clear pattern. If it's dull and smeared, then the laser could be weak.
Also, in these units are very critical alignments called the focus/tracking gains and offsets. When these alignments are off, it can often cause intermittent troubles. As the unit ages and parts change value, so do these alignments, and will need to be checked. In my time as service technician repairing DVD/CD players, 65% of the laser pick-up assembles I have tested were good and only needed a small adjustment. Today's technology makes it unfeasible for a shop to hook up a DVD/CD player, and even some recorders, to their equipment and make these adjustments because of the cost involved.

hope this may help;


DON'T FORGET TO RATE;


Regards,
VOTIT

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1 Answer

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