Question about Magnum S9 Base CB Radio

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Electrical feedback when on off switch is just turned on ie no volume i can hear a buzzing sound from the seaker and if i turn the dimmer switch to low it gets louder some sort of electrical feedback from radio

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  • Anonymous Oct 20, 2008

    i have same get in touch with knights they will tell you how to fix



  • ot4848 Jan 19, 2009

    i have the same problem, PLUS the SSB is wrong, upper is even with am freq, lsb is +5 kc over am freq. ie 27.205 becomes 27.2055 on lsb,27.2050 on usb.

    Is it a power problem or bad SSB circuit?

  • Dean Dishman May 11, 2010

    What are you using for a power supply? That could be your problem Hook it directly to the battery and it should clear it up but ground it good

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1 Answer

Phone knights 01652 648 378,its a common fault

Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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NS-LDVD32Q-10A buzzing noise


Try another input and another source such as a DVD player. If you still get the buzzing sound, you could have a faulty power supply output or a fault in the audio circuit of the main board.

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Lights can be turned off and on but not dimming. I felt the wall plate was hot to the touch. The dimmer was working until bulbs were replaced.


If your wallplate is hot, that is a sign of trouble, and possible electrical fire. That dimmer is not made for the load, or it is going bad.

Turn off the dimmer immediately. Do not use the dimmer at all. Replace with a wall switch until you have the correct dimmer.

Each dimmer is rated for Watts. Ordinary electrical switch is rated by amps. Ordinary 15 Amp electrical switch can handle up to 1400 Watts. This means 14 - 100 watt bulbs.

Dimmers are usually not rated for 1400 Watts. They have 500-600 Watt rating. Look at the side of your dimmer for Wattage information that is usually printed on dimmer.

Heavier-duty dimmers cost more and can carry more wattage. Some dimmers carry up to 1800 watts. These kinds of dimmers have aluminum heat sink visible right on the face of dimmer.

In any case, your dimmer is an electrical fire hazard and should be replaced. Add up total wattage of your lights, and read new dimmer package when buying.

Up-vote if this information is helpful. Thanks for the feedback.

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Sounds like start winding inside the motor, or a start switch attached to the motor itself.

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I need a fluorescent dimmer switch that turns lights on & off and dims the string of lights also.


Hi,

Lots to choose from, depending where you are located:

http://www.google.co.uk/products?hl=en&source=hp&q=fluorescent+dimmer+switch&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=4-ppS7GaNIz40wT5kvhi&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CBoQrQQwAA

Generally a Google for a good brand (MK are normally OK) should give you plenty of results.

Hope this helps, if so please leave feedback - if not please let me know and I'll try and help some more!

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Plug the speakers into your iPod. Any sound?
You may need to maximize the volume-control on the iPod *AND* on your speakers, but you should hear some sound, if the speakers are working.

Try a different set of speakers on your computer.

Make sure that you have not "muted" nor "minimized" the sound on your computer.

Make sure that the speakers are plugged-in to the "green" socket on your computer.

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LOUD BUZZING/HUMMING SOUND- CAN HEAR OVER AUDIO


have someone check speaker ground to the TV chassis. Your speakers are picking up reverb from the Video Signal.

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Try using a headset and the buzzing should go away. If you are hearing them through your speakers then the mike could be giving you feedback. Also try turning down the volume a bit and see how that works.
Hope this is of some help. Bud

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Sony Grand Wega KDF-42WE655; 2 problems


You have a problem with EFM interference from a light that has a dimmer switch. Turn dimmer all the way up or off, buzzing will cease

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1 Answer

Webcam Speakers Echo and Double Feedback


"Noise", as used in this document, is a general term referring to any sound a speaker system makes that is not part of the original source material. There are many different types and sources of noise, each with its own solution. Below is an explanation of the common types of noise, what causes them, and how to minimize their occurrence.
Hum or Buzz
There are four common causes of humming and buzzing:
  1. Sound card If the humming or buzzing gets louder or softer with changes in the volume setting, this is an indication of noise coming from the sound card. In this case, check all of the connections to the sound card to make sure they are all completely plugged in and secure. Then, adjust the level setting of the sound mixer to obtain the best performance. Generally, you should leave your CD volume settings in the mixer at full and reduce the sound card's master output level down. For information on doing this, please refer to your sound card manufacturer's documentation.
  2. Unused input cables If you are not using all of the source inputs to your speaker system (such as using a 5.1 speaker system with a 4 channel sound card), the unused input cables will pick up noise. The solution is different for each speaker system, as described below:
    Z-540 / Z-560 (2 channel sound card): Depress the M3D button.
    Z-640 (4 channel sound card): Depress the Matrix button.
    Z-680 (2 or 4 channel sound card): Disconnect the unused input cables from the control pod
  3. High-power devices If you are using other high powered devices on the same electrical circuit, they may be causing hum or buzz. If so, discontinue their use while you are using your speaker system. Examples of such devices include microwave ovens, halogen lamps, power tools, etc. Also note that high-power devices with dimmer switches (such as halogen torchiere lamps) will cause an especially pronounced buzzing effect. To minimize hum or buzz, make sure that the dimmer switch on these products is either all the way on or off.
  4. Electric Polarity In many countries, the US being one, the electrical power grid is polarized. In these countries, the power plugs are designed so they can only be inserted into the wall socket in a single direction. For example, in the US one of the plug blades is larger than the other. To avoid humming and buzzing, both your computer and speaker system must be properly plugged into polarized outlets. If your wall outlets do not have polarized plugs, as in the case of many older homes, and you are using adapters to plug these power cords into the wall, it is possible that the polarity of either your computer or your speaker system is reversed. In many other countries, such as most of the European continent, wall sockets are not polarized at all - making it even more difficult to properly match the computer and speaker system. To solve the problem you will need to remove the power plug from the wall outlet, rotate the plug 180°, and re-insert it into the wall. Try this for your speaker system power cord, your computer power cord, or both. You should be able to find a combination that will eliminate the humming and buzzing.
Pops and Clicks
There are three main causes of pops and clicks:
  1. Sound Card Many pops and clicks are created by the sound card. There are two common causes: sound card quality and older or mismatched drivers. If the overall volume level of the pops and clicks goes up and down as you change the volume on the speaker system, the noise is being generated by your sound card. Lower quality sound cards don't include the necessary circuitry to cleanly remove noise from the sound output. Logitech's higher-powered systems, such as the Z-560 and Z-680, are also sensitive to the overall quality level of the sound card. If you are using an older or lower quality sound card, we suggest upgrading your sound card. The other primary cause is older or mismatched drivers. Make sure you are using the latest drivers for your sound card.
  2. Multi-tasking If you are running more than one program on your computer that accesses the sound system at the same time, small pops and clicks can be common. This is a function of your computer and/or sound card. A common example is using a program that generates occasional audio feedback (such as beeps or other sound effects) while listening to an MP3 track in the background. The solution is to turn off audio feedback in the first application so that the background MP3 track is uninterrupted.
  3. Interrupts in the Digital Bitstream On digital systems, such as the Z-680, it is normal to hear a very faint "tick" when you switch between inputs (by pressing the input button). You may also hear louder 'clicks' or 'pops' on a device such as a standalone DVD player or a sound card if it is plugged into one of the digital inputs. On some systems, this noise may occur when skipping tracks, switching audio streams (for example, from Dolby Digital to DTS), or navigating a DVD menu. The clicks and pops occur because the device is sending out an interrupted digital data stream. This behavior generally occurs with older software and older players, but is uncommon on most modern equipment. The Z-680 has been extensively tested with the latest sound cards, software DVD players, and standalone DVD and CD players. If you experience extensive popping and clicking, we suggest upgrading to the latest version of your software DVD player or, if using a stand alone device, trying a different speaker model. If you need more assistance with this issue, please contact Customer Support.
Stutter
A stuttering sound track is an indication of either insufficient or conflicting computer resources. Check to make sure that your computer has sufficient processor power and memory to handle the applications you are running, especially if you are using a software DVD player. Defragmenting your hard drive may also help. If you are sure you have sufficient resources, check to make sure that you don't have any conflicting IRQ or DMA channels.
We have also seen some software DVD player/sound card combinations that cannot properly output a Dolby Digital or DTS signal through the sound card's S/PDIF digital connector. (S/PDIF is a generic term for either coax or optical digital connections.) The result, when using a Z-680 hooked up to a S/PDIF connector, is a stuttering soundtrack. As mentioned, this stuttering is caused by the computer, not the Z-680 speakers. Switching the software DVD player's sound output to the 5.1 analog outputs will generally solve this problem.
Hiss
All high-powered amplification devices - everything from multimedia systems to home theater systems to movie theater sound systems -- generate some level of background noise, or hiss. In addition, low quality sound cards with poor signal-to-noise ratios can generate a significant amount of steady hiss that is reproduced on the speakers. Under normal conditions at a normal listening distance, the hiss coming from the sound system should not be noticeable. In a very quiet room, or if you place your ear very close to the speaker, you may hear a very low level hiss. This is normal, but should be completely masked by normal music and game sounds.
If you find that hiss is noticeable, it is likely that the speakers are too close to your listening position. If the speakers are too close, you will not obtain the best imaging of the sound and you risk damage to your hearing when the system is playing at full power levels. Try moving the speakers further away from your normal listening position. We recommend at least 18" for the moderately-powered systems (such as Z-340, Z-540, and Z-640) and at least 30" for higher-powered systems (such as the Z-560 and Z-680).
Also, note that the satellites in most Logitech speaker products are designed to be wall-mounted. Wall mounting the speakers provides two benefits: 1) it moves the of the satellites further away from your listening position, making any hiss less noticeable and 2) it moves all of the satellites further away from each other, providing better channel separation and surround sound spatialization.

Feb 16, 2008 | Logitech Webcam

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