Question about Intel Pentium M 740 1.73GHz 533MHz 2MB CPU, OEM (RH80536GE0302M)

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Hooking up keyboard and mouse

I have an old intel inside pentium that I recently decided to put back to use.I feel silly but I cant find the right location to attach the keyboard and mouse to the tower.Please help.I have been searching for a diagram which shows the tower and its connections but have been unsuccessful....HELP................................

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  • Anonymous Nov 28, 2008

    hooking up a keyboard?

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... Well, first things first, are your keyboard and mouse USB or PS/2? Chances are if it's a really old computer it doesn't have any USB ports. You would then need either 2 USB to PS/2 adapter (typically small green and purple adapters) or PS/2 keyboard and mouse.

Hope this helps!

Alex J.

Posted on Mar 09, 2008

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Pentium III 500 mhz will support windows XP


Here is Windows Xp requirements:
PC with 300 megahertz or higher processor clock speed recommended; 233 MHz minimum required (single or dual processor system);* Intel Pentium/Celeron family, or AMD K6/Athlon/Duron family, or compatible processor recommended
128 megabytes (MB) of RAM or higher recommended (64 MB minimum supported; may limit performance and some features)
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I have a Pentium 2 i want to change it to a


Pentium 3 is a very old system. you will probably wont find one on sale. its hard to find even a pentium 4 this days. an intel dual core system is very cheap this days so buying a system as old a a P3 makes no sense. you can also buy an AMD based setup. for very low prices. if you still wish to buy a pentium 3 system i do not know of a place that sells those setups.

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Upgrading IBM ThinkPad T20 Intel Pentium III to Intel Pentium 4


Patrick, I'm glad to see your enthusiasm to explore and expand on your computer knowledge. Unfortunately I have to be the first to let you know that in this case your ideas on upgrading your systems by simply changing the processors just won't work.

First of all a Pentium 4 (or Centrino, which is the mobile version) literally will not fit into any of the systems you mention. All CPUs are made in specific form factors to fit into different sockets. Most Pentium 4 processors were made for Socket 478 or 478B sockets, which mean they have 478 pins on a chip roughly an inch and a quarter square. The high number of pins allow more signals and data to be passed simultaneously to the motherboard, one way the speed of the CPU operations were increased. Pentium III and older Celerons were mainly socket 370 chips on a chip almost an inch and three quarters square. The lesser number of pins were aligned in six concentric rows with a blank central square. Pentium II and even older Celerons used Socket 7 and any of a half dozen other schemes and were often put on daughtercards to make them somewhat interchangeable. It would be like trying to put a square peg in a round hole.

They also make other forms, like socket 775, 939, and the newest AM2, all of which are pin-incompatible. In certain situations there are adapters that will let you put a newer CPU into an older socket but the specific upgrades you mention have no equivalent.

There are other engineering factors to be considered as well. Not all CPUs run on the same voltage. Many desktop motherboards have been designed that are adjustable either by selecting the operating speed with jumpers (old style) or by electrically sensing the optimum speed of the CPU. Then there are the memory and bus speeds. The CPU has to be able to interact with the memory so they must share a signal speed. This is the Front Side Bus. Older Pentium 4 CPUs were designed to use PC-133 memory but more powerful CPUs. certainly any in the 2.0GHz and up range, are designed for Double Data Rate (DDR), which is PC-2100 up to PC-3200. The pin configuration of the memory is different also to reflect and optimize the faster design. Of course there is now a DDR2 design and most recently DDR3. Core-Duos and Quads use the DDR2 and DDR3 type memory.

Another factor is heat. Faster CPUs run hotter. the system must be designed to accomodate and release the greater amount of heat generated, thus there are larger heatsinks and fans and more vent holes. Otherwise the CPU would start acting erratically and eventually burn out.

Things would be slightly different if you were talking AMD chips, as the socket 472 was much more versitile and could handle a wider range of CPUs and speed, from Duron to Sempron to Athlon XP, all because of the way AMD designed their chips. Of course, they too had to upgrade to surpass physical limitations, leading to the socket 754 and other newer designs.

Desktop machines are much more flexible to upgrade because of the space available and the fact they are designed with expansion slots. If you need a higher video card to run games, or more com ports to run extra printers or whatever, you can generally place a card in a slot to add the functionality. If you reach the design limits of a motherboard you can usually swap it out. Not so with laptops.

Laptops in particular are hard to upgrade because everything is integrated into or designed to plug into the motherboard, which has to fit the case properly like a jigsaw puzzle. This is not to say it is impossible to upgrade somewhat, but usually for laptops it means putting a faster CPU of the same form. Here is an example that is specifically for the IBM T40 laptop:

http://bsnugroho.com/t40upgrade.aspx

No, if you want to upgrade to Pentium 4 or Core Duo or Core Quad speed and performance, you will have to go out and buy a laptop.

Please do not let this discourage your enthusiasm. You share the spirit of the old school to push the limits that has made all of these computer evolutions possible. Consider formal training to round out your knowledge and to expose you to more within the field.

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My computer won't boot but power supply is okay


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I accidentally changed my CPU clok frequency from 100 to 250 and now my computer won't boot?


Ok I realize this is old and you may have given up by now or gotten it figured out, but I'm gonna try to help even with that being said, first of all I just recently had the same problem, this is a sure fire way to fix your issue,
step one, open up your computer so that you have access to the motherboard,
step two, find the system battery.
step three, near the battery there should be a jumper, this will be a little plastic piece with metal connectors inside it, it should be slid onto two pins out of three available, move it over one space meaning if its on the left and middle move it to the right pin and middle pin, the three pin pole should say cmos right by it, or clear cmos.
step four remove system battery, no need to worry this is just the memory for the cmos chip and it will revert it back to when the board was new, you can change the settings in your bios program back to what they were when it last worked,
step five, making sure that your power cord is not hooked up to the computer in the back, (no power to computer) press and release your power button a few times, (this will drain the capacitors stored power)
step six, walk away for about 20 minutes, just to make sure that clearing of cmos was a success,
step seven, replace cmos battery.
step eight, move jumper back to original possition.
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PENTIUM III


dude

unplug your mouse and plug back in then reboot

or get a usb mouse

maybe you have too many programs taking up memory

just do that or buy a new computer

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Upgrading to Windows XPx64


The answer is no because your motherboard still only supports 32 bit drivers. Read On.

Here's what you need to use Windows XP Professional x64 Edition
icocaution.gif
Important: Windows XP Professional x64 Edition cannot be successfully installed on x86 (32-bit) systems or 64-bit Intel Itanium–based systems. 32-bit device drivers are not supported on Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.
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arrow_px_up.gifTop of page Additional items or services required to use certain Windows XP features • 28.8-Kbps modem or fax modem and service provider required for Internet access (service provider may charge a fee)
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solutions:
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