Question about Sony STR-DE445 Receiver

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Analog input problem

I can hear sound from all channels with digital input, 5.1 input and tape input. With all other inputs and with radio the left channel is dead! What would be the problem? I can't find out any defect component by visually.

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Same EXACT problem it is a PIECE of **** !!
Schafe1001@aol.com

Posted on Aug 28, 2008

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I have a LG47" tv


Your DVD audio is sent directly to your receiver - not to you TV. That's why you can hear the audio on your stereo. The TV audio is not being sent anywhere - it is "stuck" in the TV and is amplified and sent to the TV speakers. Since the TV speakers are off, you don't hear anything. In order to listen to the TV audio on the stereo system's speakers, you need to send it to the receiver.

You need to have a pair (left + right signals) of audio cables (assuming you wish to listen to stereo sound) from the TV's Audio Output jacks to a pair of Audio Input jacks on the receiver / amplifier. You can use any unused input - CD, Video, Tape, Sat, etc. If you use Tape or Sat audio inputs, when you wish to listen to the TV audio, you must select the Tape or Sat input on the receiver.

Do not send more than one signal to a set of inputs on the receiver. Typically, a CD, DVD and Sat inputs offer two or more of the following types 1) Analog audio. These are the older RCA jacks that have been around since the beginning and require separate cables for left and right channels. 2) Optical inputs. This is the newer digital interface that provides for Dolby Digital (and others) format sound over a single fiber optic cable. 3) Coaxial inputs. This jacks looks like an RCA jack, but usually has an Orange ring - instead of the Red & White rings that analog RCA jacks have. They use a single coaxial cable. 4) HDMI input. This jacks carries both digital video and digital audio signals. If you are using an Optical input for the DVD on the receiver, do not use any other unused analog or digital inputs associated with the DVD to "piggyback" another device like a CD , VHS tape, etc.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thank you.

Mar 25, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

2 Answers

Hello: I just purchased a DBX 128 and have no idea how to connect it up. I would like to listen to my records as well as tape using the expansion mode. However, it seems like it only hooks up to my tape...


Part 1

Let's establish a couple of things first.

1) You already have the turntable part working.
2) Your receiver has a defeatable Tape Loop.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that

Mar 10, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

How do I link my technics ge 70 graphic equaliser to my technics cd player sl-pd7a and my technics md player sj-md100 with phono rca leads . Thank you Simon


It would help to know what other electronics (receiver, maybe?) is involved.

If neither of those devices is a recorder, why do you need to connect them to the EQ when your receiver/preamp may have the facilities to connect the two playback devices directly; and the EQ in a Tape Loop?

Scenario A)

Assuming you REALLY want to have the CD and MD input through the EQ because you can't attach them any other way...

CD audio OUT to Line In; MD audio OUT to Playback;

EQ LINE OUT to whatever analog electronic inout you have in mind.

To hear and Equalize the CD set the Input Selector to Source, EQ REC button OFF; to hear the MD equalized set the Input Selector to Tape, EQ REC button OFF.

====

Scenario B:

You have a receiver with only ONE Line Level Aux input and a Tape Loop.

Insert the EQ in the Tape Loop. Attach one of the disc players to AUX and the other to the TAPE conenctions on the EQ.

====

Scenario C

You have a Home Theater System or Audio Vido Reciever.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 01, 2011 | Technics Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I have Bose 901 speakers attached to a Denon receiver, but the sound is muffled with poor dynamics. The speakers has a box which is supposed to be in the signal processing loop. The reciever is supposed...


I wrote most of this for a different receiver, but if you account for minor differences to your receiver this will work just fine.

There's good news and bad news. The bad news you need a separate amp because a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as recommended for a standard stereo receiver will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. The other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources at all. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on modern AV receivers it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devices for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what you want to do and it works great!

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Front Pre Out (or one of your analog Tape Outs) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.

Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receiver's speaker level setup.

Write off the Tape Out as an input if you use it to extract the Front L&R channels. DO NOT monitor it or you'll chop the 901's out of the signal path AND kill any digital source audio in the receiver.

Aug 29, 2009 | Denon AVR-2807 Receiver

1 Answer

No audio on any channel, even in audio setup mode, no audio headp


If you have any of its sound outputs connected to a TV or tape deck do they get the signal? If so, then we know there is sound processing somewhere inside the unit but not emerging to anyplace that requires amplification.

A quick basic check would be to tune an FM station, run an RCA cable pair from the audio output for a tape deck (see the picture at the link) to an analog audio input on your TV. Select that input on the TV and you shouls hear the FM station, or anything the receiver is configured to play. If it's silent then there is no audio signal circulating in the receiver to get out to the amplifiers.

http://www.onkyousa.com/images/hookup/TX-SR803/detail_tapedeck.jpg

Check to make sure Multi-Channel input is not selected unless that is what you're listening to as it bypasses all other sources analog and digital EXCEPT the tape; and check any Mute or Zone Controls, too.

If you hear the program on the TV but not through any attached speakers, then the amplifiers are all disabled for some reason. The click I asked about before... when you turn it on does it get a click about 5 seconds later. That would be the protection circuitry turning OFF to allow the amplifiers to function.

I notice it has a Tape function. Make sure it isn't selected as it assumes a tape deck or processor is attached and will only play back what would be coming FROM the tape deck or processor. On my Pioneer receiver it also disables any digital signal processing.

Sometimes when I'm watching TV with the remote on the seat someone moves and something bad happens. It's always some unfamiliar button that gets touched unintentionally. Look over the remote for things like MUTE, Multi-CH, Tape.

Apr 02, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR803 Receiver

1 Answer

Bose 901 equalizer


I wrote most of this for a different receiver, but if you account for minor differences to your receiver this will work just fine.

There's good news and bad news. The bad news you need a separate amp because a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as recommended for a standard stereo receiver will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. The other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources at all. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on modern AV receivers it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devices for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what you want to do and it works great!

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Front Pre Out (or one of your analog Tape Outs) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receiver's speaker level setup.

Write off the Tape Out as an input if you use it to extract the Front L&R channels. DO NOT monitor it or you'll chop the 901's out of the signal path AND kill any digital source audio in the receiver.

Jan 12, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR605 Receiver

2 Answers

Bose 901 iwht tx-sr 706


You will need to connect the speakers to the front channels as you would with any normal set(Speaker + to amp +, speaker - to amp -, etc) then you connect the special Bose equalizer through a tape monitor loop and always have the monitor loop engaged.

Dec 27, 2008 | Onkyo TX-SR705 Receiver

1 Answer

Equalizer for Bose 901 Series IV


There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as you have them will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. For one thing, the other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and for another, if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on my receiver it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devises for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what I think you're trying to do and it works great! With one caveat - My receiver actually has 5.1 analog Outputs so I can drive up to 6 external amplifiers if I want to (I drive 4). Yours does NOT so we have to be creative in extracting the front two channels from your multi-channel receiver. The obvious place would be at one of the few OUTputs on the back, assuming you have one free to use.

I see Video 1 and MD/Tape have Audio Outputs. Use one of these to feed the Bose EQ. **

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Sony STR-DE595 (Video 1 or MD/Tape Audio Out ***) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receivers speaker level setup.

*** In either case you will NOT be able to SELECT the source you use for the 901 Pre-Outs for listening, or else the 901's will not get any sound sent their way. This is what's happening to you right now when you select MD/Tape. You're disconnecting the source from the 901 EQ.

You may have to get ugly with your other input components to find them all homes on the receiver. The labeling won't necessarily match up with the device types. Mine is ugly like that and I have a lot of connectors, but I have even more input devices.

If you have CD, TV Cable box and DVD (typical) you need to assess what you have that is digital and use what you can wherever you can, then the leftover analog device(s) - PC? - can go into any available analog input that is left over.

Whichever of these connections you DO NOT use for the 901's will still be available for using some kind of conventional analog recording device or sound processor such as an EQ or dbx Expander. However, as with any digital receiver, selection of that device for monitoring will kill the sound from any DIGITAL source you have playing (or maybe it just won't allow you to monitor).

Jan 17, 2008 | Sony STR-DE595 Receiver

1 Answer

No Sound


O1 is the OPTICAL input. C1 is the COAX input. Try pressing the DIGITAL INPUT button to cycle to the analog mode.

Nov 27, 2007 | Sherwood RD-7103 Receiver

1 Answer

Bose 901 series 2 speakers


I wrote most of this for a different receiver, but if you account for minor differences to your receiver this will work just fine.

There's good news and bad news. The bad news you need a separate amp because a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as recommended for a standard stereo receiver will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. The other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources at all. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on modern AV receivers it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devices for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what you want to do and it works great!

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Front Pre Out (or one of your analog Tape Outs) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receiver's speaker level setup.

Write off the Tape Out as an input if you use it to extract the Front L&R channels. DO NOT monitor it or you'll chop the 901's out of the signal path AND kill any digital source audio in the receiver.

Nov 23, 2007 | Yamaha HTR-5790 Receiver

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