Question about Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

AUDIO Dear Expert: I own a GE Model No. 3-5375 Microcassette Tape Recorder. I purchased it about five years ago. It is a great device, yet it has a sound playback problem. The problem it has can be best described as during playback of a previously recorded tape, when I try to turn the volume to a higher acceptable volume for playback, after about after a one "increment" increase of two and a half allowable "increment" increase turns of the volume dial, the tape and its audio playback demonstrate interruptive "sound skipping" and distortion. It is necessary for me to obtain a louder volume playback because I want to transfer some tape recordings onto a CD-R by use of a computer tape recorder software. Otherwise, it would be helpful to eliminate the problem that is encountered when a higher volume level is more appropriate for audio playback for general use. Also, if a simple repair can be made to eliminate the audio playback problem, that will allow for higher quality recordings on the microcassette player because uniquely, when the volume control dial is adjusted during recording, such can provide for higher quality recording onto a microcassette tape. I can be successful with simple repairs with small electronic devices. I personally think that if I had a small can of silicon spray, that might eliminate the problem. By the way, I know where I can order one. I mention that because during audio playback, there is a noticeable causation of the problem with the volume dial as a higher volume is attempted. Yet, sometimes that may not be the complete solution. I will appreciate your forum feedback. Thank you, TEXASDUDE2008

Posted by on

  • ROBTHEDUDE Mar 09, 2008

    Hey Robotek



    Thank you for the helpful info. I found a retailer who

    sells crc2-26 lubicant. Good news is that before

    I purchased some I sort of experimented by simply

    removing the cover of the microcassette player.

    I readily found the problem.The plastic case and

    some of the (usually) required slide controls were

    causing for the volume dial to be pressed, causing

    for fluttering and distortion noise. The components

    are just too compact and also too tightly secured

    together.



    I corrected the problem though. By my simply

    being more careful with replacing the plastic cover

    helped tremendously. One other thing, even the

    weight of the internal circuit board will later cause

    for the small volume dial to become pressed. So

    now, I will playback tapes with the recorder placed

    upside down on a pad.



    I just thought that I would tell you the good news

    if you happen to check back to learn of my results.



    Thanks again for your good advice.



    Regards,



    TEXASDUDE

×

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 1,512 Answers

Hey Tex

You are on the right track, sounds like a noisy volume control. Can often be repaired with a squirt of cleaner spray into the potentiometer assembly.But I suggest you use crc2-26 contact lubricant spray, not silicone spray which is a great materials lubricant, but not electrical. Worst case, the Vol Potentiometer, may have to be replaced. Go for the CRC first and see how it goes. Good Luck, happy FixYa

regards
Graeme

Posted on Mar 06, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a cassette player on my stereo. I remember I used to record music FROM video tapes in the long past, but can I record a cassette to a blank dvd on my dvd recorder? I've tried one of those software...


you can, I have done with all my 80's tapes. You need to be prepared though, time wise of songs. After your ready, just need to connect the audio out from tape, to audio in, on dvd recorder.Everything is the same as movie, just no useing the video imput.

Mar 25, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How do I link my technics ge 70 graphic equaliser to my technics cd player sl-pd7a and my technics md player sj-md100 with phono rca leads . Thank you Simon


It would help to know what other electronics (receiver, maybe?) is involved.

If neither of those devices is a recorder, why do you need to connect them to the EQ when your receiver/preamp may have the facilities to connect the two playback devices directly; and the EQ in a Tape Loop?

Scenario A)

Assuming you REALLY want to have the CD and MD input through the EQ because you can't attach them any other way...

CD audio OUT to Line In; MD audio OUT to Playback;

EQ LINE OUT to whatever analog electronic inout you have in mind.

To hear and Equalize the CD set the Input Selector to Source, EQ REC button OFF; to hear the MD equalized set the Input Selector to Tape, EQ REC button OFF.

====

Scenario B:

You have a receiver with only ONE Line Level Aux input and a Tape Loop.

Insert the EQ in the Tape Loop. Attach one of the disc players to AUX and the other to the TAPE conenctions on the EQ.

====

Scenario C

You have a Home Theater System or Audio Vido Reciever.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 01, 2011 | Technics Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Harmon Kardon SC20


Easy, just use standard rca patch cables from the Tape Out jacks to the audio input jacks of the cd recorder.

Jan 14, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Rubber drive belts wanted for Aiwa AD-F810 cassette tape recorder


my aiwa brand cassete recorder model : TP-VS485 drive belt is broken, how replaced and where I can find spare parts

Nov 02, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Yamaha RX-V660 right channel gone


Try checking the connections.
If your really value your receiver it would worth it.

Jun 22, 2008 | Onkyo TX-DS575 Receiver

1 Answer

Heads are not turning, therefore tape is not moving.


This unit is driven by belts. I would suspect that the belts have dried up a bit and are slipping. Replacing the belts should resolve the problem.
Dan

Apr 01, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Kenwood KA-72B Stereo Receiver HELP NEEDED.


Why not plug the cassette directly into the CD recorder? Are they trying to achieve some eqalization change? If not, then this should work. It's all analog at tape level.

Mar 02, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

Not finding what you are looking for?
Audio Players & Recorders Logo

Related Topics:

139 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Audio Players & Recorders Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

98766 Answers

 Grubhead
Grubhead

Level 3 Expert

4678 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

69718 Answers

Are you an Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...