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I accidently set my boot menu to zero value on both choices now I cant boot back up

I went to my computer and opened system properties and then cliked on advance tab then went to start up and recovery settings and be damned if I didn't assign zero value to the wrong one can you talk me out of this crazy dumb mistake il never do it again ?

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  • JOhn190 Mar 01, 2008

    Im Not Sure I explained my problem correctly



    I installed win xp and used the recover previous version already on the hard drive.



    It worked great I had it Actvation all done and every thing no Problem



    Then I decided to elimanate the computer from pauseing at boot up and waiting 20 seconds to boot on into windows at this point ther were 2 choices " Windows " ( as one choice)



    and another was "windows Xp" .



    So i decide to go into my computer ,then properties , then Advance settings Tab then I set the zero value to both

    choices under "Time to display list of operating sys "

    "Time to display recovery options when needed"



    Now when I try to boot it just start over and over I can't even do another clwean install I can't boot into my operating system now I hope this explains my problem better I do Thank You for your help JOhn190

  • JOhn190 Mar 04, 2008

    Thanks I appreciate evetry thing fine now

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  • 155 Answers

You don't say which setting you have 'assigned a zero value to', but the default settings are as follows:

Default operating system - Fortunately you couldn't have deleted anything here. Just make sure it is set to the OS of your choice (Chances are there will only be the one).

Time to display list... and time to display recovery... - Both should be 30 seconds (for XP and Vista). By default, both are ticked in XP, only time to display list is ticked in Vista.

If you hit the edit button (XP only) your boot file should look something like this (upper/lower case is not important, neither is the exact order):

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

Under the system failure section, tick everything.

Default for XP is small memory dump (64 KB), for Vista kernal memory dump.

Dump directory -

XP default is: %SystemRoot%\Minidump
Vista default is: %SystemRoot%\MWMORY.DMP

Do you REALLY promise you'll never do it again??? :-)

Matt

Posted on Feb 29, 2008

  • Matt UK Mar 01, 2008

    I understand your problem now!

    Do you have a genuine XP disc or is it an OEM product recovery disc? The following will work with a genuine disc, but I can't say for sure about a recovery version...

    Press delete while the PC is POSTing (just after power-on) to enter the BIOS settings and change the boot sequence so that the 1st boot device is the CD not the hard-drive.

    Insert your CD and re-boot. From here you will have the option to carry out a new installation. As part of the install procedure, there is an option to delete an existing partition. You might be able to get away with just deleting one and not actually carrying out a fresh install. Delete one, and then re-boot to see if it's worked (you'll have to remove the CD or change the boot sequence back to hard-drive 1st before you do).

    Alternatively, it might be easier to just delete all the exisiting partitions on the disc, reformat and carry out a fresh install.

    Let me know how you get on.

    Matt.

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f311e2e.jpg
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