Question about RIM BlackBerry Curve 8310 Smartphone

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The audio quality of my music is horrible

I transfered 20 mp3 songs to my 8310 and the quality is horrible vs. when i play them on my computer. what happened? it offered me an option to convert it for better quality, but i kept it original. any advice?

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Try downloading a high-grade MP3 ripper like Audacity
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/latest/audacity-win/audacity-win-1.2.6.exe
Then get the LAME codecs
http://lame.buanzo.com.ar/libmp3lame-win-3.97.zip
You can then use the program with the LAME codec with the "-b 320" option for the highest possible MP3 quality.

Posted on Jul 09, 2008

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If you still have them on you're computer I would convert them to a format and bitrate more suited to the blackberry. I know it is a pain converting as it takes a while, but it is worth it as you can listen to the files in not bad quality( for a biz orientated device).

Posted on Apr 04, 2008

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How do I download music from iTunes to my mp3 player?


HEYA


First of all open itunes

Link your MP3 player to your computer while the iTunes software is loaded on the computer. By itself, iTunes serves as an audio player for your computer. You can transfer audio files to your MP3 player using a USB cable which comes with most MP3 players. Your computer will prompt you to name your MP3 player, and an icon identifying it will appear down the left margin of iTunes.


Click on the MP3 file (the song), and drag it into the "Library" folder in iTunes. This folder will serve as the general place to store all the MP3s on your computer. From there, you can create new playlists to select specific songs, click on the "shuffle" option to have iTunes randomly select songs to be played through your computer, or play every song in order from the library.


Select the appropriate song or playlist, and click the "Play" button on iTunes to listen. Or drag the songs from iTunes into your MP3 player's icon in iTunes to copy the song into your MP3 player.

Long live the geeks!!!!!!

Dec 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II by Tha Mp3 Doctor WMA files are...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II
by Tha Mp3 Doctor

WMA files are special. There are two types of WMA file, and the Mp3 or digital Audio Player documentation will not always tell which of these two types the Mp3 player will recognize. Type I is a non-licensed, or non-DRM-protected WMA file. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is Microsoft’s copyright system for music files. If you have a type of Mp3 player that will only accept non-DRM protected files, the product specs for your player will NOT mention the words "DRM" or "Windows Plays ForSure" on them (unless they are using it in the negative, such as "this player does NOT support DRM encryption"). In MOST cases (there are more and more exceptions), Windows Media Player will convert songs from CD’s that you personally bought from the store into non-DRM encrypted WMA format.

The second type of WMA file is a DRM-encrypted WMA file, and there are several subtypes of these. Every DRM-encrypted file can have "play rights," "burn rights," and "transfer rights." "Play rights" mean you can play the song on your computer, "burn rights" mean you can burn the song to CD, and "transfer rights" mean you can transfer the song to your Mp3 player. Once again, not all WMA files are created equal. If you have a BASIC subscription to a music service such as Napster, you may download songs that have "play rights" – you can play them on your computer without any problem; but they may lack burn rights and transfer rights – so you cannot burn them to CD, or transfer them to your Mp3 player without incident. The solution here is to upgrade your music service to the premium, more expensive subscription that includes burn rights and transfer rights.

Then there are "fixed-term" licenses and "unlimited" licenses on WMA files. A fixed-term license will expire after so many days, months, or years; and will require you to resynchronize your songs to the music service or to your computer in order to continue playing them. This is a key reason behind songs "disappearing." Napster and Rhapsody are two examples of music services with fixed-term licenses. You must resynchronize your Mp3 player to your computer every 30 days, and you must keep you music service subscription active. If you let your subscription lapse, then the songs that were once working will no longer be playable. Once again, the only remedies are to renew your music service subscription (legal), convert those songs into a different format that the Mp3 player will recognize (possibly illegal), or to use DRM-removal software (illegal and unreliable).

One word needs to be said about burning your own personal CD’s and transferring them to the Mp3 player. CD’s naturally put song files into CDA format. Most Mp3 players do not recognize CDA format. So you will have to use Windows Media Player (easiest, IMO) or some other software to convert the CDA files into Mp3, WMA, or some other format that your Mp3 player recognizes, BEFORE you can transfer them to the Mp3 player.

Real Audio files also have an encryption system, and may not work with most Mp3 players – check your product documentation.

Audiobooks are in their own format and bring their own special problems which fall outside the scope of this article.

There are a ton of music services out there. iTunes uses AAC format. Napster, Rhapsody, Bearshare, Spiral Frog, and many others use DRM-protected WMA format nowadays. Limewire and Morpheus generally use Mp3 or non-DRM-encrypted files. Double check the formats that your player will support BEFORE choosing a music service. Conversely, if you already have a music service, choose an mp3 player that’s right for your particular service. Note: most store workers do not have the faintest idea of what I have been discussing in this article, so don’t trust their judgment – educate yourself first.

AS A GENERAL RULE OF THUMB (as always, there are exceptions), all Mp3 players recognize the Mp3 file format. The Mp3 file format is the least problematic of all the file formats. It takes up less space on your Mp3 player than most file formats – so you can load more songs onto your player than if you were using other formats. So, if you download all of your songs into Mp3 format, or tell Windows Media Player to convert your own CD’s into Mp3 format, then you will rarely go wrong.

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

5 Answers

What is MP3?


MP3 is the prefered method for music downloads.

MP3 is a file format on which music is created for CD downloads which can be played either, on a computer or an MP3 player (like the one on your cell phone.)

Your computer uses pre-installed software called a media player to play the MP3 songs on the CD download. If you have a Windows based PC for example (Windows XP, Vista etc.) when you click on the download - Windows Media Player will open and automatically start playing the songs.

So, you're safe to download the music in MP3 format. It will be of good sound quality.

Mar 29, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional for PC

2 Answers

How to play .rem music


Mr Dinesh
REM file extension appears when media files are saved to device memory and are not removed when the media file is transferred to a computer.
You cant change this..after transferring the media file to the computer, rename the file to remove the .rem extension.

I hope this info help full for you

Nov 11, 2009 | RIM BlackBerry Curve 8310 Smartphone

1 Answer

File format not supported...what does that mean


Not supported format concerns one or more of the next items:
  • size: the memory size of the file ( too small or too large)
  • layout: the size of a frame for video or photo, bitrate or identification tags for music,
  • extension: the suffix added after the dot file name
e.g. photo1.jpg or photo2.tif
  • digital rights management: copy protected files sometimes can
be played, but cannot be transferred mostly.

Media like photos and videos
1. Need to have the supported format as required for the software called "Media Converter" on the computer.
2. A Media Converter must be used to convert the format into a model that can be read on the player before it is accepted to do a transfer.

Music
1. Must have the supported format as required for the player.
The identification called ID-tag contains the name of the song, artist, album etc.
The bitrate of music says something about the quality / sample rate
of the song: when converting cd audio to e.g. song1.wav or song2.mp3
(called "ripping") the quality depends on the presettings of the audio
conversion.

Sep 14, 2009 | Philips Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have an GPX MW1388 MP3 audio player I cant get it to take music


This player will only recognize certain file types, and certain WMA files have restrictions that will allow you to play the song on your computer, but will not allow you to transfer it to an mp3 player. Your best bet is to get a music service that will only give you songs in mp3 format - it will give you fewer headaches. Once you have downloaded the songs onto your computer, you can use Windows Media Player to transfer the songs to your GPX. The full user's manual is available from GPX's website. Good luck!

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Feb 14, 2009 | GPX Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I've downloaded songs but they don't show up on my player


Each mp3 player can only play songs in certain formats. A Philips GoGear, for instance, can't read iTunes format. Some players cannot read DRM-encrypted WMA files, which is what most music services use. When you load a song in the wrong format to an mp3 player, the song appears to transfer, but the mp3 player won't actually play it. The best workaround for this problem is to only load songs that are in true mp3 format - they are accepted by 99% of digital audio players. If you give us your manufacvturer/model #, and music service name, we can tell you exactly which formats your player plays.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Jan 02, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Inno music transfer!


If I understand correctly-you are saving the xm files in the xm format and thus can not be then moved to a cd or computer. You can take mp3 music though and add it to your inno but not the other way around.

Oct 20, 2008 | Pioneer XM2go Inno Satellite Radio...

1 Answer

Transferring Audio Filles


The songs are perhaps in the wrong format.  This player will not accept copy-protected iTunes (AAC) files.  Also, the license on your files may not permit transfer to mp3 players. Definitely check the bitrates on your files, b/c this Sony can only accept certain ranges of bit rate.
This is my general spiel about music formats, but note that your Sony does accept DRM-protected files with transfer rights, so not everything in the following blurb applies fully to you: All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.
-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 09, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

I need more help!


If you got the music off of that horrible program lime wire more then likely you just have corrupt MP3s (they are rampent along with viruses on that program).

however if they are legit Mp3s try restoring your ipod in itunes then reloading all the music.

if this still doesn't work try resetting your ipod and then while the apple logo is displayed hold the menu and middle button to get into diagnostic mode. From there pick FlashScan to test the internal memory

if it passes, and the mp3s are fine, it would meen the data is getting corrupted on the transfer of your computer, check for viruses, try and other USB port, or try transferring the songs from another computer

hope this helps!

Jan 25, 2008 | Apple iPod nano 2nd Generation MP3 Player

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