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I put the disk in and it comes up SdShowMissingFilesAbort Unable to create dialog

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Hi,
Is this a Floppy-Disk ? A CD or DVD Disk ?
Have you got the program on your PC to view the Files On This Disk ?
Mike @ Compurepair.

Posted on Feb 22, 2008

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How to Recover Windows XP Password with Password Reset Disk?


Windows XP not only allows you to set a strong password to protect your computer, but also enables you to create a password reset disk to recover Windows XP password. So if you forgot Windows XP password, it is no need for you to reinstall computer. However, Windows XP has been released for several years and used by majority PC users, but there are still some PC users do not know how to create a password reset disk. Here I will show you how to create and use Windows XP password reset disk to help you to perform Windows XP password recovery.

To create a Windows XP password reset disk, you need to prepare a USB flash drive in advance before you follow the steps to create a password reset disk on Windows XP.

Step 1: Click Start button to select Control Panel.

Step 2: Click User Account on the following Windows screen.

Step 3: Select the User Account you want to create password reset disk for.

Step 4: Click Prevent a forgotten password.

Step 5: The Windows Password reset wizard will come up, Click Next.

Step 6: Insert your USB drive in computer. The next box will say Create a Password Reset Disk and ask you to insert your blank formatted disk in your floppy drive. Click the Next button.

Step 7: Enter your password at the Current User Account Password Box and click Next.

Step 8: Windows XP will create the password reset disk. When the progress indicator shows 100% complete, click Next.

Step 9: Click Finish when the forgotten password wizard box prompts you to do so.

When the Windows XP password reset disk is created, a file named userkey.psw will appear on your USB flash drive. You only need to create a disk for your Windows XP login password once. No matter how many times you change your password, this disk will always allow you to create a new one. Please remember to keep it in a safe location. And when you forget your password, you can use this USB flash drive to recover Windows XP password. Below are the Windows XP password recovery steps.

Step 1: Start your computer to enter the Windows XP log on screen.

Step 2: Type an incorrect password in the Password box, and then press Enter.

Step 3: In the following Logon Failed dialog box, click use your password reset disk. The Password Reset Wizard starts.

Step 4: On the Welcome to the Password Reset Wizard page, click Next.

Step 5: Insert the password reset disk, and then click Next.

Step 6: On the Reset the User Account Password page, type a new password twice.

Step 7: In the Type a new password hint box, type a hint, click Next, then click Finish.

Now your Windows XP password has been reset. You can log on your computer with the new password. And if forget to create a password reset disk, you can still perform Windows XP password recovery with Windows password recovery software like Windows Login Recovery. It can help you recover Windows XP password by burning a bootable CD / DVD or USB flash drive. In addition to perform Windows XP Password recovery, it can also help you recover Windows administrator password, standard user password on Windows 7 / Vista / Server 2008 / 2003, etc.

on Sep 26, 2010 | PC Desktops

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Password Recovery Disk


Hi,

Take preventive measures against losing user-level passwords.

It doesn't matter if you never again remember a Windows user password. Thanks to XP's Forgotten Password Wizard, your conscience will be free and clear -- should your mind happen to accidentally misplace your user password.

I highly suggest you create a password recovery disk the minute you create your user account. Why? In order to create a password recovery disk you're going to need your password. Write it down the minute you create your user account and then proceed to creating your very own password recovery disk.

Here's how to launch the Forgotten Password Wizard:


Single-click Start menu, Control Panel, and User Accounts.
Click your user account name.
Under Related Tasks on the left, click "Prevent forgotten password" to launch the wizard.

Now that you've launched the wizard, let it walk you through creating the recovery disk. Make sure the disk you use is formatted and in the drive. After it's finished creating the disk, label it and stash it away for an emergency.


If you happen to forget your password, all you need to do is click your user icon at the logon screen. Even though you don't have your password, go ahead and click the green arrow just like you would to finish logging on to your computer. This will launch a little yellow dialog box directing you to use your password recovery disk.


Good luck!

Bhautesh.

on Feb 24, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

My new lenovo desktop (k320 3012gu)did not come with a restore/repair disk. Is there a way to create one in the event of a problem?


No need: just get a generic Windows install disk, make sure the key is put close to it so it's handy then create a drivers disk by simply downloading them from here
http://consumersupport.lenovo.com/us/en/DriversDownloads/drivers_list.aspx?CategoryID=665773
then burning them to a disk.

Feb 02, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How do I create a back-up (recovery) disk?


Hi,

You can create a set to Recovery disk from the recovery partition, to do so Click

Start Menu> All Programs> Acer erecovery management> Click Create Factory Default Disk, if you
receive any error code or unable to burn the disk, please contact Acer Technical support at 1 800 816 2237 and order for an Recovery Disk.

Thanks and regards,
Jitha

Dec 27, 2010 | Acer Aspire T160 PC Desktop

Tip

Password Recovery Windows XP


Take preventive measures against losing user-level passwords.

It doesn't matter if you never again remember a Windows user password. Thanks to XP's Forgotten Password Wizard, your conscience will be free and clear -- should your mind happen to accidentally misplace your user password.

I highly suggest you create a password recovery disk the minute you create your user account. Why? In order to create a password recovery disk you're going to need your password. Write it down the minute you create your user account and then proceed to creating your very own password recovery disk.

Here's how to launch the Forgotten Password Wizard: Single-click Start menu, Control Panel, and User Accounts.
Click your user account name.
Under Related Tasks on the left, click "Prevent forgotten password" to launch the wizard.
Now that you've launched the wizard, let it walk you through creating the recovery disk. Make sure the disk you use is formatted and in the drive. After it's finished creating the disk, label it and stash it away for an emergency.

If you happen to forget your password, all you need to do is click your user icon at the logon screen. Even though you don't have your password, go ahead and click the green arrow just like you would to finish logging on to your computer. This will launch a little yellow dialog box directing you to use your password recovery disk.

on Dec 17, 2009 | PC Desktops

Tip

Add Specific Folders to the Open Dialog Box


When you use certain Windows applications (such as Notepad) to open a file, on the left side of the Open dialog box are a group of icons and folders (such as My Documents, My Recent Documents, Desktop, My Computer, and My Network) to which you can navigate to open files.
Good idea, bad implementation. Do you really keep documents in My Computer? Unlikely, at best. It would be much more helpful if you could list only those folders that you use, and if you could choose to put any folder there, not just ones XP decides you need.
In fact, you can do it, with a Registry hack. It'll let you put just the folders of your choosing on the left side of the Open dialog box. Note that when you do this, it will affect XP applications such as Notepad and Paint that use the Open and Save common dialog boxes. However, it won't affect Microsoft Office applications and other applications that don't use the common dialog boxes.
TIP: If you want to change the dialog "frequently used" folders for Microsoft Word, try Woody Leonhard's Place Bar Customizer, one of many useful utilities from http://www.wopr.com/.
Run the Registry Editor and go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\comdlg32. This is the key that determines how common dialog boxes are handled. You're going to create a subkey that will create a customized location for the folders, and then give that subkey a series of values, each of which will define a folder location.
To start, create a new subkey underneath HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\comdlg32 called Placesbar, and create a String value for it named Place0. Give Place0 a value of the topmost folder that you want to appear on the Open dialog box-e.g., C:\Projects.
Next, create another String value for Placesbar called Place1. Give it a value of the second folder that you want to appear on the Open dialog box. You can put up to five icons on the Open dialog box, so create new String values up to Place4 and give them values as outlined in the previous steps. When you're done, exit the Registry. You won't have to reboot for the changes to take effect
If you want no folders to appear in common open dialog boxes, you can do that as well. In HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\comdlg32 create a new DWORD value called NoPlacesBar and give it a value of 1. Exit the Registry. If you want the folders back, either delete NoPlacesBar or give it a value of 0.
Turn Off System Beeps
To me, system beeps that my PC makes when it encounters certain system errors are like balloon tips-gnat-like annoyances that I can do without. So I turn them off using a Registry hack. Run the Registry Editor, go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Sound, and find the Beep and ExtendedSounds String values. Set each value to No. Exit the Registry and reboot. The beeps will no longer sound.

on Mar 17, 2008 | HP Pavilion a1410n (ER890AA) PC Desktop

1 Answer

How do you get a computer out of preparing to run system set up? it stays stuck there


Before you start looking at reinstalling Windows you need to back up your important data – just in case anything goes horribly wrong.

Reinstallation loadTOCNode(1, 'summary');
Reinstalling from Windows

If you are able to get into Windows then you should start off by putting your Windows CD into your CD-ROM drive. Close down the automatic pop-up screen that appears when the disk autoruns and then open Windows Explorer. Point explorer at your CD-ROM drive and in the root of the drive you will find a file called SETUP.EXE. Double-clicking this file will start the installation of Windows. Skip to ‘The reinstallation procedure’, below.

Reinstalling from DOS

If you can’t get into Windows then you are going to need to use your boot disk to see your CD-ROM drive. You should have a boot disk already – if not then you should elsewhere in this article for information on creating one. Once you have this disk you should boot your computer with it in your floppy drive and restart your PC. Once the disk has booted, put the Windows CD in the CD-ROM drive, switch to the relevant drive (by typing the letter of the drive followed by a colon, such as D: or E:, and pressing [Return]) and then type SETUP.EXE and hit [Return]. Windows will now start reinstalling itself.





How to create a boot disk if you can’t get into Windows



Boot into DOS (press [F8] on startup to bring up the boot menu). Put a floppy in your drive and type format a: /s. This will create a bootable floppy disk. The next stage is the crunch point – you need to find the system-configuration file for your CD-ROM drive and copy it to your floppy disk.



Next you need to copy the Microsoft CD extension on to the floppy disk. Enter COPY C:\WINDOWS\ COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE A: and hit [Return]. If this file isn’t there, it’s corrupted, so you need to find it. To do this in DOS you should type DIR /S MSCDEX.EXE, to search your drive. Once you find it, copy it on to your boot disk.

Next, make your floppy recognise the CD drive when it boots by creating CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. In DOS type A: to take you to the floppy drive. Next, type EDIT CONFIG.SYS. Type in device=< 'drivername'>.sys /D:mscd001, where 'driver name' is the name of the .SYS file from step two.

Save your CONFIG.SYS file. Next we need to create the AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Create that file by typing EDIT AUTOEXEC.BAT. Once this file comes up you should type MSCDEX.EXE /d:mscd001. Save the changes out to your disk.

uparrow.gif loadTOCNode(1, 'summary');








How to create partitions in DOS

FDISK is a powerful utility, and relatively straightforward to use. Remember that you’ll lose all your data as soon as you create a new set of partitions, and you’re away…

Boot from your floppy disk and make sure you can see your CD-ROM drive, as you are about to leave your old setup. Once happy, type FDISK to start Microsoft’s partitioning program.



Select option 3 to delete partitions and delete everything. Once you’ve done that you can create your partitions again. Select option 1 and then 1 again to create the primary partition to the size you specify.

The next step is to create your extended partition. Select option 1 followed by option 2 to start creating this second area. When prompted you should make the extended partition use all the space left.

The last step doesn’t actually create any logical partitions – you have to create these yourself in the extended partition. FDISK will automatically prompt you for the first one, just set it as big as you want.

Finally you should check that all the partitions are set up as you want them by selecting option 4 from the main menu again. Once happy with your setup you need to re-boot and then format your drives.
Reinstalling loadTOCNode(1, 'summary');


What you need
- 45 minutes of free time.
- Your Windows Product Key.
- Another blank floppy disk.

Don’t forget!



First, insert your boot disk, switch on and ensure your PC is set up to boot from the floppy drive – if it isn’t, enter your BIOS, select your floppy drive as the first bootable drive, and save your changes and exit. You should be presented with a menu. Choose the option to start with CD-ROM support.






Next you choose your set-up options. ‘Typical’ is the normal choice, ‘Portable’ is for installing Windows on a laptop, ‘Compact’ saves disk space by not installing optional components and ‘Custom’ is ideally for advanced users. We’d recommend you choose Typical.


During the next stage of the installation Windows installs software drivers for any plug-and-play devices you have attached to your system. After that, various Control-Panel settings are decided. You need to choose your geographical location in the Date and Time Properties dialog box.

Next you need to reinstall your monitor drivers. The Add New Hardware wizard will appear and try to locate drivers for your monitor. If you’ve got them on CD or floppy then put the disk in now and select Let Windows Search for Drivers. If you haven’t got any handy then you can choose Display a list of drivers in a specific location. Choose the default plug-and-play monitor.

The default monitor will get you into Windows, but limit you to 640x480 screen size with 16 colours. Once you’ve installed your monitor driver, install your graphics-card drivers. That’s it, Windows is reinstalled! Now it’s time to turn to move on into the post-install phase…
Post install loadTOCNode(1, 'summary');

Finally, your installation is complete and you’ve got a working version of Windows. A quick look at your Windows folder will probably reveal it’s about half the size it used to be, which means your PC is not only going to run faster,

Finalising hardware settings

To find out exactly what Windows thinks you’ve got installed, right-click on the My Computer icon and choose Properties. This will bring up the System Properties dialog box. Switch to the Device Manager tab and have a look to see if all your hardware is listed.

If a device has a yellow triangle with an exclamation mark next to it then it’s got a problem. Highlight the device and click Properties to get more information about what’s wrong. It’s usually the case that reinstalling the software drivers from your backups will solve the problem. Occasionally, if Windows is being really stubborn, you might need to remove the device from your hardware profile altogether and reinstall it through the Add New Hardware Control Panel before it starts to work.

.

It’s all over

, you now have a fresh installation of Windows. Once you’ve set your system up you might like to consider creating a drive image. Next time you want to reinstall Windows you simply copy this back on to your C: drive – this gets the job done in half the time and without the worry of setting it all up again.

Reinstalling your hardware

Run Add New Hardware from the Control Panel and Windows searches for plug-and-play devices that aren’t properly installed, producing a list like this.

Aug 21, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Does any one have gateway GT5220 Installation disk ?


Create an ASR Floppy Disk loadTOCNode(2, 'summary'); The following steps can create an ASR floppy disk from an ASR backup operation: 1. Format a 1.44 megabyte (MB) floppy disk and insert the disk into the floppy disk drive of the computer. 2. In System Tools, start the Backup program. When the Backup and Restore Wizard is displayed, click Next. 3. Click Restore Files and Settings, and then click Next. 4. In the What to Restore dialog box, select the media that contains the ASR backup. Ensure that the media is inserted. 5. Expand the Automated System Recovery Backup Set that corresponds to the ASR floppy disk that you want to create. 6. Expand the second instance of the drive letter that contains the system files. Expand the Windows_folder/Repair folder. 7. Click the following files from this repair folder: Asr.sif and Asrpnp.sif, and then click Next. 8. At the Completing Backup or Restore Wizard screen, click Advanced. 9. At the Where to Restore screen, set the Restore Files to: dialog box to Single Folder, and then set the Folder Name dialog box to the root of your floppy drive, for example, "A:\". 10. Click Next. The other options in this wizard are optional and do not affect the transfer of files to the floppy disk. When the wizard is finished, the files are copied to the location that you had previously specified. The ASR floppy disk is ready for use in the event of an ASR restore operation.

NOTE: The Asr.sif and Asrpnp.sif files must reside on the root of the floppy disk drive to be used during a ASR restore operation. Starting the Windows Recovery Console loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); To start the Windows Recovery Console, use one of the following methods: • Use the Windows Setup floppy disks or the Windows CD-ROM to start your computer. At the "Welcome to Setup" screen, press F10 or press 'R" to repair. After you start the Windows Recovery Console, you receive the following message: Microsoft Windows(R) Recovery Console

The Recovery Console provides system repair and recovery functionality.
Type EXIT to exit the Recovery Console and restart the computer.

1: C:\WINDOWS

Which Windows Installation would you like to log on to
(To cancel, press ENTER)? After you enter the number for the appropriate Windows installation, Windows will then prompt you to enter the Administrator account password.

Note If you use an incorrect password three times, the Windows Recovery Console closes. Also, if the Security Accounts Manager (SAM) database is missing or damaged, you cannot use the Windows Recovery Console because you cannot have correct authentication. After you enter your password and the Windows Recovery Console starts, type exit to restart the computer.

When you use Windows XP Professional, you can set group policies to enable automatic administrative logon.

Use the Winnt32.exe utility with the /cmdcons option to add the Windows Recovery Console to the Windows Startup folder. This procedure requires approximately 7 megabytes (MB) of hard disk space on the system partition to hold the Cmdcons folder and files.

Aug 02, 2008 | Gateway GT5220 PC Desktop

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