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Replacing a hot surface igniter on a Coleman

Not sure if I need to disconnect gas line to change the ignitor. I seebly ( burner and all) come out?

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You should not have to disconnect gas line,just the ignitor. It is Hard to
get to but you should be able to get it out. Turn Power off, more than likely you might have to splice in the new wires for the ignitor

Posted on Feb 07, 2010

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Yes, you will need to turn off your gas supply, disconnect some wires on the gas valve and disassemble the union to the gas valve. Be very gentle when reassembling because the ignitor is brittle.

Posted on Feb 07, 2010

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Code 11. had hot water last night


Code 11 is for no ignition.
Here is what I find:

Check that the gas is turned on at the water heater, gas meter, or cylinder.
Ensure gas type and pressure is correct.
Ensure gas line, meter, and/or regulator is sized properly.
Bleed all air from gas lines.
Verify dip switches are set properly.
Ensure appliance is properly grounded.
Disconnect EZConnect™ or MSA controls to isolate the problem.
Ensure igniter is operational.
Check igniter wiring harness for damage.
Check gas solenoid valves for open or short circuits.
Remove burner cover and ensure all burners are properly seated.
Remove burner plate and inspect burner surface for condensation or debris.

IF it has been working fine and now it isn't, I would suspect an ignitor problem.

Nov 29, 2014 | Rinnai RL94iN Natural Gas Tankless Water...

1 Answer

We have a 10 year old Rheem PVW50 Power Vented water heater that works on gas. The last couple of days it has been giving out problems. It will not maintain hot water in the tank. I restarted it and...


The igniter is glowing, but no gas ignites?
So either the gas is entering combustion chamber and not lighting because igniter is positioned incorrectly -or- no gas is entering combustion chamber because air in gas line or bad gas control valve thermostat or gas line is clogged.
When you 'restart' the water heater, somehow you are getting gas to the burner and it is igniting.
I'm not sure what the flame switch is. If the ECO was cut out, the gas control valve would not send power to the igniter and there would be no gas available for 'restart.'
I would adjust location of igniter, check if gas is entering combustion chamber, clean the gas line to the burner, and bleed gas line for air, but another suspect could be the gas control valve thermostat.
Identifying numbers are usually on side of gas valve.
Open following link to help identify gas valve:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-adjust-temperature-on-water-heater.html#intelli
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-gas-water-heater.html#clean

Jul 02, 2011 | Rheem Water Heaters

1 Answer

Hi there. there is no spark to ignite the gas in oven.


You will need to replace the spark module if you don't hear any clicking, or there is no spark present when trying to ignite the gas.

To test the Spark Module:
When properly operating, the spark module repeatedly produces a spark at the ignitor accompanied by a sharp snapping sound.
  1. Turn off gas and power supply to unit.
  2. Check wiring diagram to verify all terminals and wire connections are correct and tight with no cuts in the wiring.
  3. Prepare to measure voltage on spark module from terminal L to N.
  4. Turn power supply back on.
  5. Turn top burner to LITE position.
  6. If no voltage is present on the meter, this will indicate the electrical circuit is interrupted before the spark module
  7. If voltage is present, then check ignitor.
  8. If ignitors are ok; then replace spark module.
To access the Spark Module:
  1. Turn off electrical power and gas to the range.
  2. Disconnect gas and power from unit.
  3. Remove screws securing top surface burners.
  4. Remove surface burner and disconnect spark ignitor wire from surface burner.
  5. Raise and remove maintop from unit.
  6. Remove screws securing spark module bracket.
  7. Disconnect wire terminals from spark module.
  8. Replace and reassemble in reverse order.

May 18, 2011 | Amana Ovens

1 Answer

I need to locate a ignitor in my coleman gas furnance model 2865e766


Depending on the typ of burner it has, it should be located on the bottem in front of the burner rail, or to the side any way it will be int he burner rail, more than likey a hot surface ingintor.

Dec 30, 2010 | Coleman Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Ignitor lights up bright, but no ignition,no flame and I don't hear the gas turn on like I normally do. Top burners work fine.


Hello, welcome to fixya ! Based on your description I suspect you have a faulty bake ignitor. This may surprise you, or it may not. I think at first it surprises people when the hot surface ignitor glows but the oven won't lite. Since the ignitor "glows" one figures it would appear to be working, that would be wrong. These ignitor's serve 2 functions, 1) need to maintain a set value to open/activate the gas valve, typically around 3.5amps... & 2) ignite the fuel once said gas valve is open. A poor/faulty ignitor may glow & and even ignite the burner intermittently for moments at a time ( thus giving off some heat but never the set amount or not lite at all ) but yet not reach the needed value to open the gas valve/safety valve consistently nor adequately, hence the need to replace the ignitor. Try this and I'm certain you'll be up & running and as they say " cookin' with gas" ! I'd suggest you should refer to your specific model when ordering the part locally or on-line. The most common hot surface ignitor part is #12400035 and it will work in your Whirlpool too. Try places like repairclinic.com, searspartsdirect.com, APwagner.com etc. Thank's for visiting "fixya" for your stove inquiries. Please take a moment while here to rate the solution provided or let me know if you require further assistance and good luck. macmarkus :)

May 23, 2010 | Whirlpool AKZ159IX Oven

1 Answer

Heater will light but when gas is injected stays lit for 5 seconds then goes out


I would start with the flame sensing rod. There is a small metal rod approx 2 inches long with the diameter of a wire coat hanger.It has one wire attached to it which goes to the gas control board. It is mounted in front of one of the burners (often the burner furthest from the ignitor). This sensor sometimes develops a light coating that works like an insulator which will prevent it from sending the proper signal to the board to allow the gas valve to remain lit. In this case, the solution is simple: take a scotchbrite pad and lightly rub the flame sensing rod. This will remove the coating and allow for a proper signal to the board. Take care not to break the ceramic insulator, dislodge one of the burners, or to mistake the Hot Surface Ignitor for the flame sensing rod. The Hot Surface ignitor is the part that glows red and ignites the gas when the valve opens. It is extremely delicate. It has two wires (not one) and looks nothing like a single rod as I described the flame sensor. However, it too is mounted in front of a burner.
I hope you find this helpful. Good Luck! :-)

Feb 07, 2010 | Coleman Propane Forced Air Heater...

1 Answer

I replaced what I thought was a bad igniter.But still had no glow from new igniter. Must be something else.Where do I go from here?


Hello there: The oven bake burner and ignition components are located beneath the oven cavity. In most cases the oven bottom panel can be removed for access (check your owner's manual) but on some models the oven burner has to be accessed from below in the warming or broiler drawer area. If accessing from the top, a 'flame spreader' (flat metal plate) above the burner may also need to be removed to see the burner itself.Many ovens use a single oven burner in which case they only have a single gas valve and ignitor. The same burner is used for both bake and broil functions, the broil usually being in the drawer area below the oven. Higher-end models may have a separate bake and broil burner. On such a system there will be two ignitors, one for each burner. They may also employ a 'dual' gas valve (see illustration above) instead of using a separate valve for each burner.Some range models may have an additional broil burner located at the top of the oven cavity which may be referred to as a 'waist high' broil. If not, broiling usually takes place in the drawer area below the oven, which uses the same bake burner for the broil function. Most gas ranges currently available employ one of 3 basic gas ignition systems; pilot ignition, hot surface ignition system (which uses a 'glow bar' or 'glow coil' - aka an "ignitor") and a spark ignition system. The latter two being referred to as "electronic ignition" systems as they use electricity in one form or another to operate the oven heating system. Only the pilot ignition system has an actual "pilot" (which is a small but real "flame") which might need manual lighting.
If the surface burners of a range are a spark ignition type, the oven IS one of the possible kinds of electronic ignition systems and thus will not usually have a "pilot" which needs lighting. Be aware though that just because the surface burners might light via a spark doesn't necessarily mean the oven uses the spark type ignition system too.
There is one older style of electronic ignition system which does also use an oven pilot but it is very rare and such a system hasn't been used in oven models since the early to mid 70's. It is the 'constant pilot' *electronic ignition* system.


Making Observations
The oven burner's operation will usually need to be directly observed while in operation as the first step to troubleshooting problems.Ignition System Type Links
Ignition System Types:
  • Pilot Ignition
  • Electronic Ignition with Constant Pilot (rare)
  • Electronic Ignition with Glow Ignitor (most common)
  • Spark Ignition System

  • Is there continuity between the oven gas valve's terminals?


    Hot Surface ('Glow Bar') Ignition System (most common)
    This is the most popular system currently used for ovens and is comprised of a control mechanism (whether thermostat or electronic control), the oven ignitor and an oven gas valve.


    What happens in this style ignition system is that the thermostat or electronic control switches power to the oven ignitor and gas valve circuit which are connected in series (one after the other). As power flows through the ignitor it heats and draws current (measured in amperage). Once the oven ignitor draws a specific amount of current the oven valve opens to allow gas to flow to the oven burner where the glowing hot ignitor (glow bar) ignites it. Power must continually flow through the ignitor and oven gas valve for gas to be released into the oven burner to create a flame.

    It should usually only take in the area of 30-90 seconds for the oven ignitor to reach the proper resistance to allow the proper amperage to reach the gas valve to open it and for the ignitor to ignite the gas at the oven burner.

    Dec 30, 2009 | GE Ovens

    1 Answer

    Burners are only lighting half way and then gas cuts out. Then the system repeats it' self. coleman heater mod #7995856, serial #1287658845. this is pretty close or just like heaters used in RV'S


    OK, the burners will need to have flame on the entire surface or it will trigger a sensor and shut-off. Get a brush and maybe even one of thoes can of air and blow off the burner. Stay away from the glow ignitor because that is very delicate. Once you get flame on all surface of the burners, the unit should stay lit.

    Oct 19, 2009 | Coleman Propane Forced Air Heater...

    1 Answer

    Using alot of hot surface ignitors


    don't touch the surface of the igniter when handling it, and don't bind the mounting bracket when you tighten the capscrews, the bracket and igniter should be firm and no loose/movement if you try to move the bracket. also make sure the igniter is going back off after the burners light

    Feb 28, 2009 | Tools & Hardware - Others

    1 Answer

    Ignition failure. Relatively new furnace - under 5 years old.


    You can replace a hot surface ignitor if you are careful not to touch the silicon surface. The oil from your hand may cause the ignitor to fail. make sure to turn off electric supply before attempting. You will probably need an OEM (from a coleman dealer) ignitor.

    Usually best to bring the old one with you to make sure you get the right one with the right wire terminals. Or you can wire nut a new one to the old terminals. Could also be a dirty flame sense rod.
    Hope this helps.
    Matt

    Dec 28, 2008 | Coleman Propane Forced Air Heater...

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