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Ordering fiber I need a part number or index number to order the correct fiber 96 stran shielded SM

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Is this what your looking for? This is Indoor/Outdoor so you'd need to be more specific unless its for general use. Like if its going into a ceiling and its gonna be a dry area... You could just use Indoor type but thats a different part #

TeraSPEED, Singlemode Indoor/Outdoor Fiber Riser Rated, Fiber Count: 96, Loose Tube Single Jacket, Dry Water Block Core but Gel in Buffer Tube, Black Jacket, SYSTIMAX Solutions Part No: 760004150

Manuf. Commscope Systimax Fiber
Manuf. Part# S-RO-96-LT-D-BK-MAX
GrayBar Part# 22066834

Posted on May 01, 2008

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Is there any user guide to properly connect the Cabletogo RJ45 Toolless IDC plug?


Put the wires in and close the lid. You just need to stick the wires in between each in the correct order. With the lid on top and the part that plugs in facing away from you put the wires in for both ends in the following order. (FROM LEFT to RIGHT) Green Stripe, Green, Orange Stripe, Blue, Blue Stripe, Orange, Brown Stripe, Brown.

Nov 10, 2011 | Network Accessories

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Installing a single mode backbone using 8.3um core and butting to a 9um core of existing fiber. will there be major losses and will existing laser equipment handle the 8.3 um fiber.


I ezpect there will be less attenuation with the laser Iight going from the smaller fiber to the larger fiber as all the light bundle will impinge within the radius of the larger fiber - on the other hand going the other way some light from the larger fiber to the smaller will be lost. I actually once had to match 9 micron fiber to 62.5 micron and found a company who could stretch the larger fiber down to the 9 micron giving me a light "funnel" which worked fine for the 800 foot distance I had to cover. Because lasers are powerful and the excess gain is high I expect you have a great chance of it working if your distances are not "miles". If you can get a hold of a laser emitter and receiver cable tester that would let you know your losses quickly. Reliable fiber communication with good cable is all about getting enough light thru to carry a signal. Perfection is not necessarily required as in my example.

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This answer reffers to a windows based machines. First, a router is needed. Second, each PC must have a network connection. Use cables is order to connect between the computers if they are located close to one another.Then run network cables to the router, set Network Settings / TCP/IP settings to 'acquire an IP address automatically' . This will set up the network allowing you to transfer files and play network based games.

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1 Answer

Fiber optics termination


If it is loose tube cable, than you can do it in two ways. First using SC SM pigtails, which should be spliced on each fiber (don't forget that you need to protect the splice itself and protect bare fibers puttung them in same cassete or tray or ....) or the other way using "break out system" which will give your bare fibers more protection but the SC connectors can be mounted directly on the fiber in this system. Cheaper and preferable way is the first one.
If it is tight buffered cable there is also two ways of termination. First, directly mount SC connector on a fiber (no need for break out system) or splice SC SM pigtails. Cheaper and preferable way is the first one.
Good luck!

Sep 12, 2009 | Adapters.com Fiber Optics Cable SC/SC...

1 Answer

How many fiber optic closures are needed in a 375 km fiber cable?


it depends on the drum length; if your drum length is 4km then you need 94 closure,

thanks
Nasr Kutkut
nasr@kutkut.com

Jan 06, 2009 | 3M Cable Assembly, Fiber Optic Duplex...

2 Answers

Fiber cable running through a steam tunnel


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Dec 05, 2008 | Seicor Fiber Optic Cable

1 Answer

How to ground shielded network cable


There is no need for this shielding in most applications. There is always the consideration of ground loops that may be created, particularly, if large current RF energy is present. If you would care to read a discuss of the pertinent facts, see below.

"This message was received from Joe Gwinn of Raytheon regarding the shielding of Gigabit Ethernet links. These links run at data speeds of 1.25 x 10**9 (yes, 1.25 billion) bits per second, over two-pair, 150-ohm, balanced cabling. We use one pair for the transmit direction, and another pair for the receive direction. The 150-ohms balanced cabling has an overall shield, and here we are discussing whether to ground the shield at one end, the other, or both. Joe writes: On the matter of how to ground the shields (hardwire to ground, or through a capacitor), and ground currents melting shields, I would like to offer my experience with the care and feeding of ground loops in the shield protecting low- level signals: use a resistor, not a capacitor. Specifically, the voltage offset between chassis (green wire) grounds rarely exceeds ten volts. If one puts a hundred-ohm one-watt carbon resistor in series with the shield at either end, with the other end directly grounded to the chassis, the ground current will be limited to 0.1 amp, well within the abilities of the shield to carry. The twisted pair within the shield will still be protected from EMI etc, and a suitable differential receiver will have no difficulty handling the power frequency and harmonics 10-volt common-mode voltage. Actually, I have seen offsets of only a few volts in the laboratory, and have used ten-ohm one-watt carbon series resistors. I have seen several volts in large buildings, and in ships, so I would design for ten volts RMS. Which end should be hard grounded, and which should have the series resistor? I haven't tried this for communications signals, but my theory would be that the receiver end should be hard grounded, because it's the receiver that handles the lowest-level signal, and a zero-ohm ground is better than a 100-ohm ground. The effect may not be all that large, because shields handle high-impedance noise sources, and 100 ohms isn't much compared to those impedances, except perhaps at very high frequencies. The 100 ohm resistor could therefore be bypassed with a RF capacitor, which would be protected from ESD puncture by the 100-ohm resistor. By the way, the ground noise may be at triple the power frequency, if the user system has lots of capacitor-input 5- volt power supplies fed from the three legs of a three-phase prime power system. I have measured 2.4 volts RMS at 240 Hz in an Air Traffic Control automation system, until the green and white grounds were disentangled. The effective source impedance was about one ohm, if I recall. The waveform was pretty close to a sine wave. When it was able to drive a current through the VMEbus logic ground, the system promptly fell over. I knew I was in trouble when I saw a spark when I touched one ground to another. The tripling comes from the merger of the pulsating currents into the 5-volt power supplies in the common ground impedance. Joe Gwinn *-------------------(REPLY FROM DR. JOHNSON)--------------------* Thanks for your interest in High-Speed Digital Design. Joe, I am going to disagree with your suggestion that a shield with a resistor at one end acts as an effective EMI shield. In high-speed digital applications, it doesn't. In high-speed digital applications, a low impedance connection between the shield and the equipment chassis *at both ends* is required in order for the shield to do its job. The shield connection impedance must be low in the frequency range over which you propose for the shield to operate. The measure of shield connection efficacy for a high-speed connector is called the ground transfer impedance, or shield transfer impedance, of the connector, and it is a crucial parameter. In the example you cite, the ground transfer impedance at one end of the cable would be 100 ohms, rendering the shield useless. In low-speed applications involving high-impedance circuitry, where most of the near-field energy surrounding the conductors is in the electric field mode (as opposed to the magnetic field mode), shields need only be grounded at one end. In this case the shield acts as a Faraday cage surrounding the conductors, prevent the egress (or ingress) of electric fields. In high-speed applications involving low-impedance circuitry, most of the near-field energy surrounding the conductors is in the magnetic field mode, and for that problem, only a magnetic shield will work. That’s what the double-grounded shield provides. Grounding both ends of the shield permits high-frequency currents to circulate in the shield, which will counteract the currents flowing in the signal conductors. These counteracting currents create magnetic fields that cancel the magnetic fields emanating from the signal conductors, providing a magnetic shielding effect. For the magnetic shield to operate properly, we must provide means for current to enter (or exit) at both ends of the cable. As a result, a low-impedance connection to the chassis, operative over the frequency range of our digital signals, is required that *both* ends of our shielded cable. (See Henry Ott, “Noise Reduction Techniques in Electronic Systems”, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1988.) There are shielding approaches that provide a low ground transfer impedance at high frequencies, while at the same time providing a much higher impedance at 60 Hz. These approaches involve the use of shields that are capacitively- coupled to the chassis. They are used where high-frequency shielding is needed, but where there is a desire to limit the circulation of 60-Hz currents. For a capacitively-coupled shield to work, the impedance of the capacitor, at the frequency of operation, must be very low. For example, if the signal wires couple to the shield through an impedance of 75 ohms (that’s another way of saying that the common-mode impedance of the cable is 75 ohms), and the shield is tied to ground through an impedance of 0.1 ohm, then we would expect to measure on the shield a voltage equal to (0.1/75) = 0.0013 times the common-mode signal voltage. The shield in this case would be giving us a 57dB shielding effectiveness. These are the specifications that our IEEE 802.3z 1000BASE-CX copper cabling groups feels are necessary to meet FCC/VDE regulations. For any shield to work in the Gigabit Ethernet application, we will therefore need a ground transfer impedance (that is the impedance between chassis and the shielded of the cable) less than about 0.1 ohms at 625 MHz. If you check the specifications for the BERG MetaGig shielded connector, it beats this specification. It provides a direct metallic connection between chassis and shield that goes all the way around the connector pins, completely enclosing the signal conductors. To achieve equivalent performance with a capacitively-coupled shield, the effective series inductance of the capacitor would have to be limited to less than about 16 PICO-henries. That small an inductance cannot be implemented in a leaded component, it would have to be a very low-inductance distributed capacitance, possibly implemented as a thin gasket distributed all the way around the connector shell, insulating the connector shell from the chassis. We have seen proposals for this type of connector, but have not seen one work in actual practice. I do not advocate the use of capacitively-coupled shields for our application because: (1) It would add complexity, (2) It hasn’t been demonstrated to work, and (3) It would not expand the range of our applications. Keep in mind that the short copper link we are discussing (P802.3z clause 39) is intended for use inside a wiring closet. It only goes 25 meters. It will be used between pieces of equipment intentionally tied to the same ground (we call out in the specification that this must be the case). Between such pieces of equipment there will be no large circulating ground currents. For longer connections, we provide other links types which do not require grounding at either end (multimode fiber, singlemode fiber, and category-5 unshielded twisted pairs). Direct grounding of the shield at both ends is the correct choice for our application. Best Regards,
Dr. Howard Johnson "

Oct 31, 2008 | Network Accessories

1 Answer

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Pretty sure software has nothing to do with it...it might just be a bad cable. try plugging in some thing else. if that doesn't work, check the port and the peripheral you are trying to connect. also make sure you have installed the correct drivers.

hope this helps

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