Question about Philips FR965DHT Receiver

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My Phillips FR965 has no sound

One of my surround sound system speaker wires connected to the receiver in question layed over a plug to another component totally unrelated to the Surround sound system that was hanging out of the outlet just a little as I was repositioning the receiver and it arced and since then the receiver comes on and appears to work normally but it does not put out any sound to any of the speakers? Is there a fuse inside that I can replace or something relatively inexpensive to get it to send sound to the speakers again or did I fry something that will be way more expensive than it would be worth to replace?

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Has anyone figured out why this problem occurs regularly on this model mine worked for 1 month turned it on and there was sound but volume control didn't work then after 5 mins no sound again

Posted on Jun 27, 2011

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There should be a fuse which is there normally to protect the speakers. Make sure if you find it to replace it with an identical size and style fuse for future protection. Also before I tried it again I would disconnect each speaker and make sure none of them are shorted from the arc which would also give you the symtoms you have. They should read between 4 and 16 ohms across the wires depending on what system you have. If any read 0 ohms they will need to be replaced before using the system again. Let me know what you find.

hardrocko

Posted on Feb 05, 2010

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I have a vsx44 pioneer and i plug my subwoofer do not work my sub has 2 wires and i have an adapter to plug at the receiver


Is the adapter on the back of the receiver a yellow one (like a tv's red/white/yellow)? And the sub itself is a 2 wire (red/black)? If the subwoofer is just a speaker with no electronics and you answered yes to the first two questions then continue reading...

Problem: New receivers suck and are made for subwoofers that are self powered. The subwoofer input on the receiver only puts out a low signal. The subwoofer itself will amplify the the signal.

Solution: Find a receiver that supports the older subwoofers or do like I did... buy a used 3D surround system for around $10 on eBay, if you don't have one laying around. Be sure to find one that shows a picture of the back so you can verify that it has the 2 wire inputs and supports a subwoofer. Once you have it, connect a cable from the receivers subwoofer output into the surround systems input. It will be only one wire so plug it into the left (white) input on the surround box. You can also use a splitter to get both left/right inputs.

This will enable your subwoofer to be used again and will also give you alot more control over it. Turning off the surround sound box will allow you to keep the bass off when needed. You will also gain individual volume control over your subwoofer this way. I hope this helps!

Mar 01, 2015 | Pioneer Elite 7.2 Channel Network Black AV...

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How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Denon receiver not working surround output


If everything is connected correct, the only thing I can think of, is you don't put in a surround signal. If you only feed 2 way stereo, only two speaker will work. Also if you switch to stereo, the other channels will stop working. Check the cables, the settings and the input.

Jun 15, 2014 | Pioneer VSX-D511 Receiver

1 Answer

Hi how do I get surround sound coming from my tv


A Samsung home theatre system can make watching movies at home like going to the theater. Proper setup is essential to get the full benefit of the Samsung system, which is available in 5.1 and 7.1 channel surround sound configurations.
Typically the final step in setting up any home theater is connecting your TV to your system.
Like most home theatre systems, your Samsung home theater receiver will allow you to plug all of your components into it, meaning you only have to run a few cables to connect your television to your system.
Make sure your playback devices are properly connected to your receiver.
Whatever playback devices you use, make sure they are plugged into the appropriate inputs on your receiver.
DVD and Blu-ray players, satellite boxes and cable boxes should all be plugged into video inputs, and CD players should be plugged into audio inputs.
Your receiver will have labels on the back panel indicating into which input you should plug your devices.

Connect the video out to your TV's video input. Make sure you use the correct cable to make the connection. For newer receivers, the connection will likely be either HDMI or component.
If your receiver has an HDMI output, use an HDMI cable to connect the receiver to the HDMI input on your TV.
If your receiver uses a component output, use a component cable to connect your receiver to the component input on your TV.


Connect the audio output of your TV to one of the audio inputs on your Samsung receiver if you want to output your television's audio through your home theatre system.
Most recent TVs will either use an optical cable or a digital coaxial cable to connect to the receiver, allowing you 5.1 channel surround from your television.
If you have an older set, you will likely have to use standard RCA cables.


Turn on your receiver and press the "Setup/Menu" button on your receiver's remote.
When "Input" appears on the display, press the right arrow key on your remote to select TV from the list.


After selecting TV, press the up or down arrow keys on your remote to select the audio input jack into which you have plugged your TV's audio cable.
Press the "Exit" button on your remote to exit the setup menu and lock in the settings.


Samsung home theatre system owners guide download
http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/200903/20090327091825515/HT-AS730S-XAA.pdfalso
If you're not an electronics junkie, hooking up your surround sound can seem daunting.
There are so many wires and settings that it's understandable why some people might rather pay someone else to do it for them.
But you can do it yourself as long as you make sure the speakers are positioned correctly; the wires are not only plugged in all the way, but plugged into the right places; and the settings on your television and amplifier are set up correctly.

Check to make sure your surround-sound speakers are correctly installed.
Locate the test function on your surround-sound remote control or amplifier panel to do this.
You will know your speakers are hooked up if sound comes out of each speaker during the test.
Make sure your audio cables are hooked up properly.
Make sure the audio cables running from your television to your amplifier are plugged in correctly. The red and white wires should be plugged into the "Audio Out" spot on the back of your television.
Those same red and white audio wires should be plugged into one of the "Audio Input" spaces on the back of your amplifier.

Turn on your television.
Locate the "Menu" button on either your television remote or your television set.
Scroll through your options until you find "Audio Mode" or a similar naming convention.
Select it.
Scroll through your options until you find "Digital Audio Out," or a similar naming convention. Choose it.
Scroll through your options until you find "Dolby Digital Out." Select that option.
Power your surround-sound system on.
Make sure you have the correct audio input selected.
After the correct audio input is selected, make sure you actually have the Dolby Digital aspect of your surround sound system turned on.
The default for most surround-sound systems is the standard two-channel, stereo output.
Set up a home theater
http://www.cnet.com/1991-7386_1-6214422-7.html

Aug 07, 2013 | Samsung Ht-E355 330W 5.1 Channel Home...

1 Answer

Sansui hdlcdvd26s


see the diagram attached, you can have wrong connection. However clean the contacts and test the wires.God bless you
he speakers are not connected properly. Check the speaker connections. The sound level on the rear or center speakers is turned down. Adjust the sound levels. The receiver is not in the proper surround mode. Set the receiver to a surround mode. The speaker settings are incorrect. Check the settings as per the user's manual.41a9b9c6-64e2-4745-adf3-95fdac1fe686.jpgba7a1620-dfc0-4e45-8fea-6237135735f9.jpeg

Jul 26, 2013 | Televison & Video

2 Answers

Hi i have recently got a lg surround system without a manual, i think all the speakers are set up correctly as i have done a sound test on it and they all seem to make noise however i am having trouble...


You should have 2 RCA jacks on your TV and on the back of your receiver ... a white and a red. These are the left and right audio jacks. Generally, I hook up the audio out from the TV to the DVD player, then from there into the receiver ... this makes it easier to turn off the connection to your receiver if you want to use the TV speakers for news and whatever (by turning the DVD player off). Once the RCA cables are all hooked up, the information should have no problem transferring to your surround sound receiver. Now that the connections are all made, check the settings on your receiver. Make sure that you have the surround sound turned on, and that the receiver has all speakers selected (hunt through the menus and find the "dolby 5.1" or "THX" surround options and turn one on. This SHOULD resolve the problem.
If this did not repair your issue, make sure that all of your equipment that you are running through is all capable of surround sound (if you have a really cheap DVD player like me, it may not be able to handle surround sound). If your TV is surround capable (LCD, Projection, and Plasma TVs are usually all capable of this ... CRT tvs are not always capable) but your DVD player is not, hook your TV's audio RCA cables directly to your surround sound receiver and you should be set. If your TV and DVD player are not capable of Dolby or THX surround sound, then you will probably not be able to use that feature, so your satellite speakers might not work, but the main left and right should still work fine.
One other thing that I have had issues with in the past is the connections on the back of the receiver. If you are using speaker wire (a lot of newer systems have input jacks instead of wire because they are easier to deal with) then make sure you have stripped enough of the wire to make a good connection in the back of your receiver. If you have too little wire exposed, or if you have pushed the wires in too far, the insulator on the wire will block the connection. To be sure this is not the case, be sure that only the exposed part of the wire is sticking into the back of your receiver. Also, make sure that you are not trying to run too much wire between the receiver and the speakers -- if you have a 100ft wire between the system and the speakers, they might not be getting a strong enough signal to work -- you can buy a signal amplifier for your speaker wire, or you can use a shorter wire.
Most likely you have to find the settings in your menu and turn on the other speakers. If the sound test worked for all of the speakers, the connections are all good, and it is the system not telling the speakers to work.

May 26, 2011 | Nintendo Wii Console

1 Answer

Unable to connect surround sound with a stero player


There is a obvious difficulty here. If you have a stereo receiver then it can't produce surround sound. You must have a surround sound receiver to present true surround sound. If you already do have that then on the back of your Phillips set there are audio outputs. The left and right audio out will be decoded in your surround sound receiver and they will automatically play from your speakers. You should have seven speakers, center channel, left and right front speakers, left and right rear speakers and left and right mid or side speakers. A sub-woofer would be nice too. Best bet is to speak with the store you purchased the set from. They will have that information.

Zashiban

Jun 23, 2010 | Philips Televison & Video

1 Answer

Add 2 speakers outside on a 6 speaker surround sound and hear all


You won`t get surround sound mix with 2 speakers, you can have a 2nd zone but this will only play a "Stereo Sound" if you have that playback option with the SC-RT50, what you will need is a speaker selector switch or better known as an A & B switch, this will ideally run from the front left and right speaker output of the receiver into the A & B switch then run into each pair of speakers inside or outside, what is common nowdays are receiver that are known as 2nd zone connections where you can have 2 sets of speaker in different rooms, unfortunatly the SC-PT50 does not have this option.

Feb 03, 2009 | Panasonic SC-RT50 System

1 Answer

No sound when using dish or regular tv


This may be old news but just in case ...

Typically you need to consider the surround system as the central point for sound distribution (and in newer receivers, the distribution point for video signal as well). So you need to think of your TV and Satellite as sound sources and connect them to the IN side of your surround sound system. From the back of your TV then, look for the Audio OUT (commonly Red for right and White (or black) for Left. Connect these to the IN on the back of the surround system. Likewise for your satellite box. Then make sure you select the appropriate source on the surround system. If the system supports the video signal, you can route that as well. Beware that you'll need some sort of simulation (provided by the Phillips unit) to upconvert stereo to surround ... check the manual online. If you post model numbers for the Phillips and satellite units, we might be able to direct you more specifically (provided we can find manuals online)

Feb 24, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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