Question about Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

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Light meter No matter where I set the f-stops and shutter speed and no matter what the light is like in the situation i'm trying to shoot, the blinking LED light registers that the picture is underexposed. In other words, the down arrow at the bottom of the scale of numbers on the right hand side keeps blinking. however, it reads what i've set the shutter speed to just fine. that is, it registers what i've set but doesn't seem able to suggest what i should set it at. the LED lights are not dim, so i don't think the problem is a weak battery. can you help me figure out what is wrong? thanks, emily

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  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    i'm not sure what ring you mean. a ring on the lens? the aperture ring itself has a small tab. aside from the aperture ring, it doesn't look like there's an additional ring on my fg. should i take off the lens? i mean, is the ring you're referring to on the camera body? i'm worried that the sensor is busted and that's why the light meter's off. thank you for your help.

    emily

  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    Yes. I removed the lens. Now I see the plastic ring with the tab that you are referring to. What do you suggest I do next?


  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    Yes, it does do that.

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit May 11, 2010

    On the front of the camera, there is a plastic ring around the mount. It has a small tab on it that moves with the aperture ring on the lens. What does this ring do? Can you move it? It should be springy.

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  • 667 Answers

Yes, on the camera body, you have to remove the lens. The ring sits outside the metal mount for the lens.

Posted on Feb 23, 2008

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit Feb 23, 2008

    does it move to the left then snap back to the right when you move it with your finger?

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit Feb 23, 2008

    Well, I'm afraid there is not much you can do. Nikon no longer services the FG nor do they have replacement parts. A great lightweight camera for its time. The only other thing to look at is the frame counter. Does it count properly? There is a switch that turns the power on completely in the camera once the counter reaches '1' If the counter isn't working properly, then there may be a solution to make repairs. BTW: My last name is Pettit, couldn't pass on this question...

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Nikon FG Shutter Speed Fixed at 1/90


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I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera


Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

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If you are looking through the camera eye piece, it will show it as an over exposed image, but it you look at the finished product (if you are shooting on Manuel which I suggest), you can still move the aperture and speed to change the final out come.

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How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

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3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

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Try it on bulb, and open the f and check it is working properly the problem might be the computer inside the camera and there's no replacement spare parts, but yoou canfind another ody and swap the computer.

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1 Answer

My Pentax Camera Light Meter is not registering changes made to the Aperture Ring.


Take lens off to check the lens/light-meter coupler situated inside the lens mount at the top part of the mount at 'one o'clock' . First see if it moves freely ,clock wise. Then -with the lens off- look through the view finder while you activate the coupler : moving it should make the l.meter lights move up and down.
If you are not getting any joy the connection between the coupler and the board needs re-soldering ( dry joints ) : remove top cover and resolder two blue wires on left hand side of the board . This should do the trick.

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1 Answer

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Well, Sports Mode is a fully automated mode, which I believe tries to balance the exposure toward faster shutter speeds. An over all dark photo indicates an underexposure. You can adjust for underexposure by dialing in a 1/2 stop or so on your exposure compensation dial.

However, dark AND blurry indicates that you just didn't have enough light. The first thing you want, for that same shooting situation, is some faster film. Go up at least an f-stop or two (eg, if you're shooting with ISO 100 film, try ISO 400).

Pay attention to the shutter speed the camera is setting. If you're stilling still, photographing action, you'll want a pretty fast shutter speed, or you WILL get blurring. I'd recommend at least 1/250th second, faster still if you're trying to freeze motion.

A more advanced technique is to pan with your subject. Follow the subject with the camera, and use a medium to medium fast shutter speed (1/60th-1/250th). You will get some blurring, but if you learn this well, your subject will be pretty clear, and the background will blur... thus including the suggestion of speed in the final photo, rather than something that looks frozen. That can deliver a much more satisfying shot.

I have used Canons for years, but I avoid all of the those special modes, like sports modes. They're really trying to deliver some help, but these are techniques you should learn in any basic photography course.

If you set the camera to Av mode, you can choose the widest aperture available for that lens, which will always get you the fastest possible shutter speed -- thus, the least chance of blurring. If you still blur, you need more light, a lower f-stop number, or faster film.. those are the only cures.

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1 Answer

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