Question about Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

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Light meter No matter where I set the f-stops and shutter speed and no matter what the light is like in the situation i'm trying to shoot, the blinking LED light registers that the picture is underexposed. In other words, the down arrow at the bottom of the scale of numbers on the right hand side keeps blinking. however, it reads what i've set the shutter speed to just fine. that is, it registers what i've set but doesn't seem able to suggest what i should set it at. the LED lights are not dim, so i don't think the problem is a weak battery. can you help me figure out what is wrong? thanks, emily

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  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    i'm not sure what ring you mean. a ring on the lens? the aperture ring itself has a small tab. aside from the aperture ring, it doesn't look like there's an additional ring on my fg. should i take off the lens? i mean, is the ring you're referring to on the camera body? i'm worried that the sensor is busted and that's why the light meter's off. thank you for your help.

    emily

  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    Yes. I removed the lens. Now I see the plastic ring with the tab that you are referring to. What do you suggest I do next?


  • Ishem Feb 23, 2008

    Yes, it does do that.

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit May 11, 2010

    On the front of the camera, there is a plastic ring around the mount. It has a small tab on it that moves with the aperture ring on the lens. What does this ring do? Can you move it? It should be springy.

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  • Master
  • 667 Answers

Yes, on the camera body, you have to remove the lens. The ring sits outside the metal mount for the lens.

Posted on Feb 23, 2008

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit Feb 23, 2008

    does it move to the left then snap back to the right when you move it with your finger?

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit Feb 23, 2008

    Well, I'm afraid there is not much you can do. Nikon no longer services the FG nor do they have replacement parts. A great lightweight camera for its time. The only other thing to look at is the frame counter. Does it count properly? There is a switch that turns the power on completely in the camera once the counter reaches '1' If the counter isn't working properly, then there may be a solution to make repairs. BTW: My last name is Pettit, couldn't pass on this question...

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I did not get any instructions with my Opteka. Have tried to take photos with it. But they came out all blank. I used a tripod. Would like to know where I can down load instructions. Certainly not as good...


You did not provide enough information to determine what your problem is. For example, were the pictures all light or all dark. Knowing this lens, I will assume that they were all dark. So...

1) This is a very, very slow manual-focus lens. It will not auto focus. It must be manually focused very precisely because it has virtually no depth of field.
2) Depending on your camera, your internal light meter may not work. On my camera (Nikon D-90), it does. If it does not on yours and I suspect that may be your problem, you're going to have to shoot everything manually, i.e. setting the shutter speed and lens opening yourself. You can use your internal light meter to help you get started by taking your light reading before you install the lens...preferably using the aperture only setting where you set the aperture at f8 which I think is the speed of the Opteka and let the camera set the shutter speed. Make a note of the shutter speed then attach the Opteka to the camera and mount the lens on a tripod with the camera attached.
Then set your camera mode to manual and set the aperture to match the lens (f8, I think). Set the shutter speed at the speed you noted earlier. Shoot a picture using a remote shutter release or the self timer. This lens is so slow that unless you're in exceptionally bright conditions you will get fuzzy pictures due to camera movement at full zoom of 1200m and above if you're using the 2X doubler. I would start shooting at minimum zoom of 650 without the 2X doubler. Shoot a picture. and check the result.

You should have an image but it may be too light or too dark.

If its too light you'll need to increase the shutter speed or stop down the aperture to, say, f11...or both. Make the adjustment and shoot another picture. Remember that if you increase the aperture, you increase your depth of field, making focus less critical. If you increase the shutter speed you make camera or subject movement less critical.

If it's too dark, you can only increase the shutter speed because you can't open the lens any wider than f8. Make the adjustment and shoot the picture.

Keep doing this until the pictures are the way you want them.

This is a decent lens for the price and worth the little money they cost if you can't afford $10,000 plus for a high quality telephoto lens of this size. I would forget about the 2X doubler because as others have said, it further reduces the speed of an already very slow lens with such a high rate of magnification that a knat landing on the lens could cause the picture to blur from movement.

Jun 26, 2011 | Opteka 650-2600mm High Definition...

1 Answer

What are the best settings to use the Opteka 500MM Mirror Lens with a Pentax K-7. Also when you you add the 2.0X teleconverter with this lens?


These big lenses are very slow and cannot deliver much light to your camera. Obviously, you can't open the aperture any wider than f8 as specified by the lens itself. In the old days, most inexpensive cameras were fixed focus at f8 with a shutter speed of 1/100 sec. That's a good place to start with this lens without the doubler.

If the pictures are too dark, you can't open the lens any wider so your only option is to reduce the shutter speed.

That means that motion of the shooter or the subject will be more inclined to cause blurring so you need to be shooting from a tripod with a remote shutter release and/or a delayed shutter release setting.

If the test picture is too light, I would first reduce the lens opening to the next stop, f9 or f11, then shoot another test shot. You could also increase shutter speed, or both o reduce the light reaching the camera sensor. Keep shooting test shots until you get the exposure you want.

Once you add the doubler, you compound this situation because it will further reduce the lens speed by about 2 f-stops, meaning that you have to start your tests at f-11 at 1/100 sec. or f-11 at 1/50 sec. This gives you far less flexibility to properly adjust exposure.

Further, you will have increased the magnification so much that a slight breeze or a fly landing on the lens can cause vibration and blur the picture.

Before you shoot any serious pictures, you need to experiment with this lens so that you know exactly what its capability is.

Jun 23, 2011 | Opteka 500mm f8 for Pentax K

1 Answer

What an adapter I need to connect Nikon D200 with Metz 60CT4?


Just the regular Metz pc sync cord. Connect that to the sync connector on the side of the D200. The trigger voltages are fine. Set the camera to manual, 125th of a second. Set the slider on the back of the flash to the film speed you set on the camera. Use the "auto" slider to pick the "C" setting that approximates the distance you're shooting, and read the f stop off the scale. Set that on the camera. Try a test shot or two and adjust f stop, C setting, or film speed if it needs tweaking. Slow the shutter speed if you want more ambient light in the picture. Or of course meter it with a hand held incident light meter. I just did some shooting at a local horse show. Was in the stands so couldn't meter. Took some test shots of the people setting up the ring, and adjusted so when the competitors rode out I was pretty much on.

Oct 25, 2010 | Metz Mecablitz 60CT4 TTL Flash

1 Answer

I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera


Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

Oct 06, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shooting in low light with a canon rebel xt


Hello parr_alp,
Please keep in mind that when shooting in low light, you will ALWAYS get some amount of blur when you are hand holding the camera unless you use a flash. The only way to increase your shutter speed is to crank up your ISO setting to 800, 1200, 1600, etc. If there is no tripod handy, brace yourself against a stationary object and remember to keep your elbows tucked down near your body when shooting (no sense in holding up your arms, too).
There is no way to increase the ISO limits of your camera while maintaining quality of your images. And once again, you will ALWAYS get a certain amount of blur when hand holding the camera. 
The external flash not firing is an entirely separate issue. This could have to do with your metering, a bad flash, bad connection in the hot shoe, what shooting mode you're in — the possibilities are numerous. The next time your flash doesn't work, write down all the settings of your camera and keep track of them (i.e. shooting mode, metering mode, flash settings, current lighting situations, etc.) You may start to notice a pattern and perhaps we can help you here.
Anyway, happy shooting, and if this response was helpful, please rate it! Thank you!
Jeff

Mar 13, 2009 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

F stop settings not responding


Try it on bulb, and open the f and check it is working properly the problem might be the computer inside the camera and there's no replacement spare parts, but yoou canfind another ody and swap the computer.

Oct 01, 2008 | Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures in Sports Mode


Well, Sports Mode is a fully automated mode, which I believe tries to balance the exposure toward faster shutter speeds. An over all dark photo indicates an underexposure. You can adjust for underexposure by dialing in a 1/2 stop or so on your exposure compensation dial.

However, dark AND blurry indicates that you just didn't have enough light. The first thing you want, for that same shooting situation, is some faster film. Go up at least an f-stop or two (eg, if you're shooting with ISO 100 film, try ISO 400).

Pay attention to the shutter speed the camera is setting. If you're stilling still, photographing action, you'll want a pretty fast shutter speed, or you WILL get blurring. I'd recommend at least 1/250th second, faster still if you're trying to freeze motion.

A more advanced technique is to pan with your subject. Follow the subject with the camera, and use a medium to medium fast shutter speed (1/60th-1/250th). You will get some blurring, but if you learn this well, your subject will be pretty clear, and the background will blur... thus including the suggestion of speed in the final photo, rather than something that looks frozen. That can deliver a much more satisfying shot.

I have used Canons for years, but I avoid all of the those special modes, like sports modes. They're really trying to deliver some help, but these are techniques you should learn in any basic photography course.

If you set the camera to Av mode, you can choose the widest aperture available for that lens, which will always get you the fastest possible shutter speed -- thus, the least chance of blurring. If you still blur, you need more light, a lower f-stop number, or faster film.. those are the only cures.

Nov 29, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

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