Question about Heating & Cooling

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I have an air exchange system in my house. I also have a dehumidifie set up with it to remove the humidity in my house. I want to make sure he set up the system correctly. He has the fresh air going into the air exchange and it ducts out to a "T" duct. fresh air goes to the house and also goes to the dehumidifier. the dehumidified air goes to the air exchange to a "T" duct that is mixed with the stale air from the house and is connected to the air exchange that appears to go through the air exchange and is vented outside. Is this right?

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  • pquin1 Feb 01, 2010

    I live in Massachusetts. I am gathering that you will tell me that my air conditioner is a dehumidifier. A good thought. the guy said that there was very high humidity last summer even though the temperature was in the seventies and suggested that I just run the dehumidifier when the temp did not call for AC. Not sure if that was good advice. Just to make sure, I have four ports on the air exchange. all ports are being used as indicated in my prior e-mail. the guy has the stale air and dehumidfied air going into the same port into the air exchanger. Is the inside of the air exchange made up of vents or does all of the air get mixed together. I am assuming that the stale air is separated out from the fresh air and vented outside or why bother even having the thing. Am I right there. It seems to me that the dehumidifier, the way he has it set up is doing absolutely nothing. I have a rotating wheel in the air exchange that is simply not working and I am comtemplating getting a new air exchange. Do you have any suggestions? did I waste money buying a dehudifier? I know that I will get stuck with the dehumidifier, can I use it to dehumidify the basement as a separate unit. It is really moist in my basement. Can you please just tell me what I should have bought and how to fix the problem. any help would do.

  • pquin1 Feb 01, 2010

    Hi, just wanted to add. Shoud the dehumidifier just been attached to the fresh air duct going to the house. then all of the fresh air would be dehumidified. It is in the basement and there is plenty of room to do that? Am I crazy here? it seems simple.

  • pquin1 Feb 04, 2010

    Hi heatman, can you tell me what the benefits of having the basement air dehumidified. I don't want to waste my dehumidifier-how would one hook up the dehumidifier in the basement. My new HVAC guy said to dehumidify the basement as well. Maybe I stumbled upon somebody who is good. I just want to make sure it gets hooked up right. It has two ports, do I need a blower to circulate the air. I guess you need to vents to the outside. I am assuming that the vents should not be placed near the vents for the air exchange so it does not interfere with them. What do I look out for and is there any place that I can read to make sure these guys know what they are doing. I have had a hell of a time with HVAC guys not know what they are doing. Is that common in the industry and do you know of any good guys in Northampton MA ? Can I work with you a bit.

  • pquin1 Feb 04, 2010

    thanx for your info. are you an HVAC guy? with regard to the dehumidifier, do I centrally locate it and how do I circulate the air in the basement, several fans?

  • pquin1 Feb 04, 2010

    I had the HVAC guy put in air conditioning in my house. the unit is outside and the blower, hepa filter is in the attic and vented into the master bedroom on the second floor and the great room(living room on the first floor) The fan makes alot of noise and I have been asking him why and he has no response. Is there a reason why a fan would be so loud and is there anything that I can do about it. I can get all the models and numbers for you if that would help. I believe that he ducted the air exchange (in the basement) fresh air duct up to the attic space and into the hepa filter and then into the air conditioner subunit. Is that the way he was supposed to do it? I am beginning to learn about positive and negative air pressure and the length of the ducts. Not sure if he did any of that. Where do I start. I am beginning to realize that I hired someone who really does not know what he is doing and I may have wasted alot of money. Can you help me?

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Hello. Reading your description of the air flow patterns, it appears that you have good reason to be questioning this installation. All of the dehumidified air should circulate through the house. I recommend that you contact the company that installed this system and have a supervisor come out to inspect this job. If it is a one man operation, have the installer come back and go through the system with you to explain what he did and why. This will be the time to question him about your concerns. And of course, your back up is always the Better Business Bureau and your State Attorney General's Office if you need to file written, formal complaints. Regards, Joe

Posted on Feb 10, 2010

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Hello,
I think you are right and it is hooked up wrong. The air that is also coming out of "FROM" the dehumidifier should also go to the main duct suppling air to the house, not blowing back outside again... the dehumidifier is doing nothing but costing you money. At least if I have read you correctly.
My question is this? Do you live in the deep south where you have high humidity all of the time?
Please comment back to me as to where you live so that I can get a better idea of what the guy was trying to do there.
Then I can better help you get it right.

I will be in and out this afternoon, but I will get back to you..

Heatman101

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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  • D. Floyd Kolb
    D. Floyd Kolb Feb 01, 2010

    No you are not crazy!!! Just unhook the dehumidifier like you thought you should and just run that for the basement. If you are going to replace the air exchanger get one without the wheel. The wheel actually transfers humidity BACK INTO the home instead of venting it out. Having the wheel not working will no hurt anything as long as the rest of the blowers are working.

    For now just unhook that duct that goes back to the air exchange and make it all go right into the house...



    I think you had it all correctly thought out, you just needed confirmation that you were correct..



    Heatman101

  • D. Floyd Kolb
    D. Floyd Kolb Feb 04, 2010

    lol... HVAC guys that know their stuff are few and far between..

    The dehumidifier should not have to run outside...you wold just bring the air in one port and it will blow out the other..just recirculate the iar in the basement, unless it is something different then I am thinking of.

    Hope fully you have found a good guy, but you can also look for a guy on www,heatinghelp.com there a guys in your area that advertise there...look for the "find a contractor" feature and then enter your zip...



    You have the unit so you might as well use it...hope you can find a guy that will do a good job for you!!



    Heatman101

    You can also comment back here... I'll answer...

  • D. Floyd Kolb
    D. Floyd Kolb Feb 04, 2010

    Hi,

    Yes, I am an HVAC guy...

    as far as the basement goes,

    location will not be that importantas long as there are no walls blocking the air flow.

    The air will naturally circulate enough if the space is open.

    No need to use fans usually.

    The blower in the dehumidifier will be sufficient



    Heatman101

  • D. Floyd Kolb
    D. Floyd Kolb Feb 05, 2010

    Hey,

    Sorry it took so long to get back to you I have been busy and my wife got backfrom Fla. last night so I kinda took the night off... :-)



    Anyway the blower is noisey because you either have it installed so that there is no duct between the blower and the intake to absorb the blower noise or it is running at too high of a speed for the size of the ductwork, which will also make it loud...I see a lot of duct sized too small.



    Yes, the air exchange could and probably should be tied to the A/C air handler, but going from the basement to the attic is probably too far to move ebough air for it to be effective.



    I can try to help you here, but with out being able to be on site and get the right perspective on your job it is very difficult and I'm kinds just guessing on some things...

    It would be really good for you to get a good HVAC Guy the can come and get things fixed right for you. Stinks that you will have to pay for the job twice!!!



    Keep asking questions and I'll do the best I can here...



    Heatman101

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Following your explanation, it is quite right connected.

He knows what he is working on.

Cheers and thanks for using Fixya.

Do remember to rate this solution/ suggestion.

Posted on Feb 05, 2010

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Goes on.... humidity % registers 70 but in just a minute or 2 it begis to decline and ends up at Lo which then wont pull water from the air. I know it is humid, some sensor must be getting fouled up.


70% is not what the dehumidifier is removing. It's what it is maintaining. Which is extremely high humidity. To lower the humidity level in the house lower it to 35%. That will remove a large amount of humidity over a fairly short (4 hours) period of time. If you have an analog unit (no LED Screen) set the humidity extraction knob on Maximum, which is 35%.

Keep in mind, dehumidifiers work the opposite of what you think.

Hope this helped you and thanks for choosing FixYa..

Sep 16, 2011 | Dehumidifiers

Tip

Heat Air Exchanger for Heat Recovery


An air-to-air exchanger is used to recover heating or cooling and to improve the air quality of the building that it serves. Typically an air exchanger has two fans, one blowing air into the house and one blowing air out of the house. In the winter time the one fan brings the outdoor cool air through the core warming it with the warm stale air you are exhausting. In the summer time the warm air from the outside will be cooled as it enters through the core to save on your cooling.

Air exchangers often are used to perform many functions such as reducing air contamination, heating or cooling air entering the building, and humidifying or dehumidifying air before it enters the building. Air to air heat exchangers or heat recovery ventilators, are used to provide a balanced flow of air into and out of a building. Ultimately an air exchangers main function is to switch the stale inside air with fresh outside air while exchanging the heat or cool in the process.

There is some controversy about the savings of exchangers. Not only does it require electricity to run the air exchanger, but the air the exchanger brings into your house must be brought up to temperature. This may require that more electric is used to cool your building or that more fuel is also required for heating.

The amount of air that these air exchangers bring into a home may vary depending on how the system has been installed. The codes in many places require a minimum amount of air to be exchanged. Check with your codes official to see what the requirements are for you.

Air exchangers can be a very good thing for many buildings. Especially those that are very large and typically have a lot of occupants with little natural air exchange from doors or windows being opened. However they are also a health hazard if they are not serviced

All air heat exchangers will require regular maintenance. The problem is that this is almost never performed by homeowners, and unless they know about the exchanger it is often overlooked by contractors during service calls. The real problem is that clogged, air-to-air exchangers can make the indoor air significantly worse than it would be without the system installed at all. If you have a home that already has a heat air exchanger, make sure that you keep it very well maintained or disconnect it.

Many air exchangers are controlled simply by on and off switches, but in some applications where the removal of humidity is required, then a humidistat can be used to turn the machine on and off to achieve the humidity level that you want. In cases where there may be a lot of humidity the air exchanger may not be enough to solve the problem. Other devices may be needed to lower the humidity to the level that you want.


on Dec 24, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Whirlpool dehumidifier ad35dssi runs, but doesn't collect any water, even in a wet area. Have cleaned filters, no luck.


Glad to hear that you thought to clean the filter, as that would have been one of my suggestions. Because, it's the most overlooked.

But, there is another one that equally overlooked and is probably the number cause of your humidifiers problem. The humidity extraction level is set to HIGH. Lower it to 32 - 35%. If your unit does not have an LED Screen readout, set the control on MINIMAL.

This is what gets confusing about the use of dehumidifiers. They work backwards from what most people think. The lower the setting, the more moisture/humidity is extracted from the house. The higher the setting/numbers, the more humidity remains in the house. The higher setting would be used only in the Winter, because removing all the moisture and humidity will make the house uncomfortable.

If this wet area, you mentioned is a basement. The ambient air temperature at floor level is colder than at chest level and dehumidifiers don't work well in temperatures between 40 & 60 degrees F.
If this is the case, placing the unit up off the floor on a sturdy table, counter, etc that can hold the weight of the unit, plus a full bucket of water will generally solve the problem.

Also, be sure that you're maintaining at least 12" of clear air space on all sides of the unit. If the air flow is obstructed, the unit will run all day and not extract any water.

Hope this helped you troubleshoot and solve the problem. Please let me know. Thanks.

Jun 13, 2011 | Whirlpool AD35USS Dehumidifier

1 Answer

Our dehumidifier turns on for only a few seconds, then shuts off.


Wendy, it's probably because the humidity level on the unit is set higher than the humidity level in the house. Keep in mind, the humidity level you set the control to, is not the amount extracted from the air. It's the level you want it to maintain. The higher the percentage level, the more humidity stays in the house. The lower the percentage level, the more humidity it removes, until the lower humidity level is reached. Then the humidifier will automatically shut OFF and/or the unit shuts OFF, because the bucket is full. Once it's emptied and replaced, if the unit needs to continue to extract humidity, it will start running again.

Hope this helped you solve the problem. Please let me know. Thanks.

May 04, 2011 | Maytag M7DH45B2A Dehumidifier

1 Answer

Plug it in turn it on and nothing in the bucket after several hours


Hi, Mindy! The following is an overall review of what causes the problem you listed.

If the room air is less than the set air, then there is no water in the bucket, because there is almost no humidity in the air. If it is winter, there is likely not enough humidity in the air to have water collect in the bucket. A dehumidifier will only pick up humidity out of warm air. If you are running a dehumidifier in your basement in the winter, the room may be damp, but too cold for the dehumidifier to pull out the humidity. Try running the unit in the bathroom after having a hot shower without the bathroom fan on. If working correctly the unit should draw water. In addition, if you set the humidity level you want to maintain higher the actual humidity level in the house or room, it won't pickup and collect any moisture. The fans on most of the dehumidifiers on the market today run almost constantly. They do this, so that the room air is always moving and if humidity is detected, it will extract it.

Hope this helps you understand how dehumidifiers function and what you can expect from them under given circumstances,. In fact, there may not be anything mechanically wrong with yours. But, to make sure, do what is suggested above to test the unit.

Apr 29, 2011 | Haier Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

The dehumidifier cuts off when it is set on 70% as soon as the compressor cuts on. i can leave it on lo and it runs.


If you're setting the humidity level on 70 % , that means you want to leave the relative humidity in the house at 70%. That's why the dehumidifier is cutting off. Your house is already at 70% humidity or higher. If you want to remove humidity, set the level lower. If your trying to make it cooler in the house or remove a lot of moisture, set it a 35 to 45%.

Hope this helped solve your problem.

Apr 16, 2011 | Kenmore Dehumidifiers

2 Answers

What setting should I set my dehumidifier for % humidity when the room temperature is 68


THE LOWER THE % SETTING, THE MORE MOISTURE THE DEHUMIDIFIER WILL REMOVE!!!
I have a Provic dehumidifier mainly to remove damp from walls in my 1900s terraced house ( 3rd DPC failed, another on its way). I've read a lot about the technical side and all I wanted to know was 'do i set it on the highest or lowest % to extract moisture from the walls'. I rang the Managing Director at Provic (his contact details are given on their website) who was very helpful. He advised that the lower the setting, the more damp would be removed from the walls and therefore the air, as the water passes from the wall into the air. My DH ranges from 40% to 70% so he advised me to set it at 40% in the worst affected room to remove as much moisture as possible from the walls. As the moisture is removed, the DH will collect less water and set itself to the correct level anyway. He advised me that when as much water as possible has been removed from this room and the DH % will not drop any lower, to move it to a more central position in the house, such as the hallway to then start setting the rest of the house to the correct humidity level. I set the DH to 40% and left it on overnight closing all doors to the affected room and removing containers of water such as a vase of flowers. When I got up in the morning it had switched itself off as it had already collected 3 litres of water! You do have to be careful not to over dry the air as everything, furniture and electricals, naturally needs moisture, but for a short term, quick drying solution, this level is ok.
Hope this helps!

Jan 01, 2010 | Maytag Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

Water is not condensing


Most dehumidifiers do not have an air filter and periodic coil cleaning is required. Remove the plastic housing and clean coils with water or air. Be sure unit is unplugged and dry before plugging back into the wall soket.

Jun 27, 2009 | Kenmore 54501 Dehumidifier

1 Answer

I have the Renewaire Energy Recovery ventilator system, Model EV130, installed in my house but do not know how to set it to the proper setting. The runtime numbers go from 10 to 100 and I am not sure what...


The RenewAire system is sized per ASHRAE 62-1999, residential air exchange of .35 air changes per hour, or 8 air changes per day. You can find an operation sheet for the PTL @ www.renewaire.com, downloads, residential, controls, PTL. A chart shows a starting point of ventilation based on the square footage x 8 foot ceiling height with a run time percentage for each model. For 2250 square feet with 8 foot ceilings, the run time for an EV130 is 85%, cycling hourly.

Actual run time will vary by tightness of house, number of occupants, lifestyle (number and frequency of pollutant generating activities). Outside weather conditions should have little effect on run time percentage. I run my system @ 50% year round, when the windows are shut.

The ERV tempers humidity and temperature extremes of the ventilation air year round. It is not a substitute for heating or A/C; it does not dehumidify the house in summer (it does reject some of the incoming summer humidity content, when the net humidity is greater outside than inside). It will lower humidity of the house in winter, or whenever the net humidity outside is lower than inside.

It will ventilate the house in an energy efficient manner all year long. Based on this information, choose a setting and manage the amount of run time to achieve your best IAQ.

Apr 25, 2009 | Air Purifiers

1 Answer

We installed a honeywell DH90 whole house dehumidifer #B08167014 4026552. Unit is removing water but the supply side is warm air. We are wondering if this is normal or if this air should be cold.


I assume you mean the exhaust side of the dehumidifier, which goes into the supply duct of the furnace.

All dehumidifiers, whether small portable types, or whole house types, exhaust warm air (which is also dry air) as they remove humidity. The whole house unit which you have is a great solution to humidity control. Since the furnace fan should be running on a call for dehumidification, the mixing of the air in the building which is circulating and the exhaust (Dry) air from the dehumidifier negates, or dissipitates the heat in the air coming from the dehumidifier.

Jul 31, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

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