Question about Janome MyLock 634D Mechanical Sewing Machine

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My seams pull apart

I've been sewing for years on on Janome serger, but lately the seams aren't tight -- when I flatten the seam and pull at it (as it would pull when worn), the seam actually pulls apart -- not so that it comes apart, but so that it looks very unattractive with lines of stitching horizontally all up and down the seam. Is there something I need to adjust?

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  • 1,388 Answers

Sounds like a tension issue.

Check your tension units and thread guides are clean and free of lint....a rag moistened with methylated spirit (denatured, surgical etc) run between the disks will help.

Normal factory tension setting = 3 for all dials although resetting this style of tension unit is, frankly, awkward, so if it ends up being other than 3, don't worry too much, just write it down somewhere handy.

Start with all at tension 3 and try using 4 different colours of thread and sew a scrap to see the balance of the tensions to more easily locate any that are loose.

Ideally, the 2 needle threads should appear as secure dots not at all "loopy", while the looper threads should meet neatly at the edge and be a firm join without pulling at the edge on one side or the other.

Get the needle threads right first, then small adjustments to balance the looper threads....after a few adjustments you will probably have it back to normal.

If you want any more help with this, just drop a line through the "Contact Us" page at www.bargainbox.com.au

Posted on Feb 18, 2008

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How do I set my Bernette 334D to overlock thin T-shirt material?


Thin, light-weight fabrics present some issues with sergers, ie the fabric tunnels with the stitching. Usually, it is better to use a narrow seam. Also, a stabilizer (wash-away) or even adding a strip of thin paper (toilet tissue, adding machine tape, etc) to the seam will help the fabric hold its shape when stitching. I have also sprayed & ironed heavy starch on thin fabrics to help stabilize.

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What size needle required for sewing Velvet curtains??


What kind of velvet? Poly-based fabrics often require ball-point needles to avoid pulls. For apparel weight velvet (something I'd make a skirt with), I'd probably use at least an 90, possibly heavier. For really heavy, upholstery-weight, I'd use my walking-foot machine and a 100-110 (often used for jeans). But I'm sure I'd want to bind all of the seams on my serger, I often bind after sewing the regular seams, but for very heavy fabrics I'd bind first (just run up all of the edges of each piece before sewing seams).
Hope this helps.

Apr 06, 2015 | Janome Memory Craft 4900QC Mechanical...

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How do I adjust the seam allowance to cut 1/4 inch


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To the right of the cutter, on the front cover, there are markings indicating various seam allowances. Placing the fabric edge along the specific seam allowance will automatically cut off the required amount of fabric and the serged seam will be on the seam line. Do a test sample first to ensure that the marked lines refer to the left needle or to the single needle that you are using.
Yes, there is a blade position dial too. It is located closest to you on the left side on the bottom. The larger the number, the wider the seam. Again make a few test samples to ensure the results that you are seeking.
Happy stitching.

Sep 10, 2014 | Brother 1034D Serger Sewing Machine

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On my bobbin side of the materal after i sew its just tons of thread on that side and the stitch is not tight


Loose on bottom indicates trouble with top tension. Re thread your machine with the presser foot UP. sew a test seam. If you still have problems adjust the top tension. sew a test seam. If you still have problems clean between the tension discs with some sturdy fabric and unwaxed dental floss. Sew another test seam.

Still problems? Wind the top tension tight then back off 1/4 turns until the seam is balanced.

Aug 16, 2012 | Janome Sewing Machines

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Stitching is too loose on the Juno Janome Serger Model 3434D


sergers the most frustrating machines. Every time you change fabrics you go through a tension adjusting phase.

First make sure you have threaded the machine in the proper order. upper looper, lower looper, then needles from right to left. Always thread any machine while the presser foot lever is in the UP position.

If you ever break a thread... you MUST pull all threads and rethread using the proper order.

Ok that's out of the way. Pull all your threads and get out several pieces of the same fabric scrap. Thread each pathway with a different color. This will help you determine which thread is giving you fits. Sew a test strip. Which thread is loose? tighten/loosen that tension. Keep doing this until you have a well balance seam. Then clip the colored threads starting with the upper looper thread, tie off to your proper color for your seam pull the thread through and up through the throat plate. proceed in this manner with lower looper, right needle, left needle. Sew a test seam.

Good luck.

Aug 08, 2012 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I have just been given a huskylock 341. The tension is off. How do I correct this?


Have you used an overlocker before? If not, I'd suggest that you obtain a user manual for it as they are completely different to a sewing machine and at some point you will need to rethread it. You can purchase one from here
http://pages.sewing-machine-manuals.com/173/PictPage/3923709707.html

This machine makes three and four thread seams, which is a combination of two needles and two loopers. For the three thread seam you can use either the left or right needle which gives you different sized seams. For the four thread you use both needles, one goes through the middle of the seam and the other is on the left side securing the seam. tally_girl_70.jpg On most overlockers you are able to move the cutting blade too and this will reduce or increase the amount of fabric being trimmed from the right side.

This page http://sewing.about.com/od/sergersoverlock/ss/serger.htm will give you some general information on sergers/overlockers too.

So adjusting tension is a matter of changing the tension on the top and lower looper threads to close up against the cut edge, or moving the blade over to make the seam a little wider or narrower. You may also need to finess the left needle tension so that the seam doesn't pull apart, I always test serge two layers and then pull open from the right side and see if the needle thread is showing (it will show a little bit but you dont want it so loose that it pulls open. Only tighten the needles in very small increments though, as you'll break threads and needles if you turn them up too tight.

Hard to explain without seeing what your machine is seaming now. But as a rule of thumb, start with all four tension dials (or 3 if doing a three thread seam) on 5. If the tension dials are correctly calibrated then this should give you a pretty good seam. You may wish to lengthen the stitches, I usually work with stitch length of 2.5 (same as your sewing machine stitch length) Stitch length will be a dial on the right side beside the flywheel or in front of the blade area. The blade adjustment should be a little knob near the blade area too. There will be a lower fixed blade and a moving upper blade which sits against the lower one, they work like scissors to trim the fabric. So to adjust the blade, you will need to take the pressure off the upper blade, then wind the knob to move it left or right.

Different weights of fabric will behave differently on the overlocker so you do need to adjust tension for each new project. For example, if seaming a jersey knit you'd use a four thread seam, this gives elasticity and strength and you can join two garment pieces with this seam. You'd probably make a 6mm or 7mm wide seam, the left needle will secure the fabric and the loopers will encase the fabric smoothly while the right needle secures them and gives extra strenth to the seam.

But on organza for example, I would make a very narrow three thread seam using the right needle as the organza will roll inside the overlocking if you cut the fabric too wide.

And on something like curtains I would neaten the edge with a wide 3 thread seam using the left needle to get a very wide seam, the fabric wont roll so you'd need to loosen the two loopers a little to smoothly encase the cut edge.
tally_girl_71.jpg For example, on this image above you can see that the looper threads are laying a little off the edge of the fabric in places, particularly the lower looper, (the side that looks like Y's where you can't really see the middle needle thread), so I would tighten the lower looper about .5 on its dial, then test again.

I hope that this makes sense to you, you will need to test serge, and adjust one dial at a time, test again and look at the result, then maybe adjust another thread until you are getting a smooth looking seam.

Sep 05, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Hi. About 5 years ago I purchased a Janome 744D Overlocker which I have only used once because the thread on the underside keeps snapping, and the needles keep breaking off. The foot is also very touchy...


Yes, overlockers sew fast, usually 1500 stitches per minute and with a blade in action alongside the loopers so there is a lot happening. Keep all pins well away from the seam edge, contrary to normal sewing machine techniques, if you pin two layers together, then place the pins parallel to the fabric cut edge at least 2 inches away from the edge so the pin goes nowhere near the foot or blade.

Check whenever you use it, that you firstly extend the thread aerial up to full height, you need to ensure the threads can flow smoothly to the tension dials as the thread will stream off fast, even the slightest catch of a thread will snap one, throw your tension out or damage a looper.

As you've had it all this time and not used it, why not consider investing a few dollars more and go to a class on overlockers, and learn how to thread it up for three, four, rolled hem and using the differential feed. If there is no class options in your area, then try the Janome dealer near you and see if they would consider giving you a a little lesson on using it. You could also check out the videos on You-tube or read some pages from Debbie on www.sewing.about.com, she has several pages on sergers (USA name for overlockers), explains the needles, threading, different techniques and maintenance. Or check out your local library for any books on sergers/overlockers, there are several good "how to" guides out there that would certainly help you get started.

Unfortunately there is no way to slow the speed to half speed, just practice with lots of fabric scraps at first, to get used to the sensitivity of the foot control. If you do dressmaking but aren't sure where to overlock or which seams you could only overlock, then consider just doing a three thread overlock around the edge of each fabric piece before you commence assembling the garment, just do your notch markings another way such as chalking them or using water soluable marker pen as the blade will cut away your outwards notches.

My other suggestion would be to make a simple sweat shirt on it using the 4 thread stitch and not touching your sewing machine at all. Once you've made one, you'll soon be wizzing them up in 30 mins, so quick to sew knits on an overlocker. Some of the commercial patterns are marked as suitable for sergers, look for one of these to try.

I hope this helps you to master your overlocker, a lesson or class would help you with the steep learning curve at first.

May 22, 2011 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I have a new Viking Huskylock S25 and the serger tensions are off and I cannot get them adjusted.


How do you mean the tension are off? A serger should have 3 or 4 tension knobs (although yours looks like it is push button digital settings) and generally from new these will produce a standard stitch when all are set to 5. Are you sure that you've got the thread pulled into the tension discs fully? Check each one by pulling on the thread below the tension disc and feel for resistance, if the thread pulls very easily, then recheck and thread again.

Have you got the thread aerial raised up to the full height? Remember also to put the plastic cone holders under the thread cones as you want the cone to stay still and the thread to feed off it - it does this very fast, sergers sew at 1500 stitches per minute so the thread streams off the cones very quickly.

Using a serger is quite different to a sewing machine and your model looks like its one of the later computerised ones with multiple stitch options including coverstitch. I'd suggest that you go back to your dealer and ask to spend time with them for a demo, thread up in front of them for pointers or take a class to familiarise yourself fully with the machine. Then go home again, break out the manual, and go through threading up from scratch several times until you've got it off pat. Remember to thread top looper, bottom looper, left needle, right needle in this sequence always, then pull all threads under the foot, lower pressure foot and serge off a short chain. To change colour thread, you can always cut and knot on new threads, turn tension down and pull through the loopers, but you've got to thread the needles fresh each time you change colour.

There is some good videos on You-tube, Nancy Zieman has a several and she's also written several books on using a serger and obviously the manual is first point of reference.

Each fabric will behave differently so for each new fabric, you will need to adjust tensions and move the blade to get it stitch and just encasing the cut edge at a suitable width. To work out how it should look, break out some ready to wear garments and have a look at those seams, then test and practice with your machine to get a similar stitch. Always test serge two thickenesses if you are going to use it to construct your garments and pull open from the right side to ensure the needle thread is tight enough so the seams don't pull open under wear.

Good idea to keep your test seam samples in a notebook and write down the settings you used for reference next time. I have to say, I've done flatlock with silky decorative thread once in 19 years - but I do know how to set up the machine for this. However, rolled hem with wooly thread is very useful and I often use this to edge hems. I'm envious of your coverstitch option, this is great for hemming and necklines and is something early sergers didnt do.

Just checked out this model on an Ebay vendor's site and it mentions a training DVD, you've got several different stitch types to master with this machine so there will be some learning and practice involved to get it right. Good luck - I hope this is of some help but I'd be visiting the dealer for specific help if you can.

Apr 29, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

How do I adjust the stitch length on a Janome "My Lock" 234?


Is there a dial on the right above the flywheel? This is where you adjust the stitch length on most sergers. It might be numbered from 0 to 5 or 4.

tally_girl_23.jpg
If it has differential feed, there would be a dial there for this too, possibly under the stitch length knob - it would have numbers like -1, -0.5, 0, 0.5 and 1 on it.

If you are new to sergers/overlockers I highly recommend a class, demonstration or investing in a good book to get you started as they are not like sewing machines and many of the techniques are best demonstrated such as rolled thread edging and flat lock seams.

I've borrowed he Singer book "Sewing with an overlocker", or "Serge with Confidence" by Nancy Zieman from my library but there would be other titles too.

Apr 13, 2011 | Janome 2049LX Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

Can i raise height of presser foot as material is too thick to fit underneath


Not unless the model you are using has more than one height adjustment. This would be addressed in the instruction manual for the machine.

If you raise the heigth of the presser foot too much, the tension control will open and the thread will not form a proper stitch - you will get a loopy stitch that will not hold.

Intersecting seams where you may have 8 layers of fabric can be flatten somewhat with a nylon hammer, or lay a cloth over the seam and use a regular hammer.

I use this when hemming jeans - the flat-feld seams are super thick when turned under for hemming.

Use a longer stitch length when sewing thick fabrics.

Make a sample, replicating what you will be sewing to test techniques and adjustments to the machine before sewing your project.

Feb 22, 2010 | Janome Sewing Machines

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