Question about Gigabyte GA-M61P-S3 Motherboard

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System and Processor fans don't spin- anything else is working

The fans are not working 9 out of 10 cold reboots. The bios settings show 12 Volt test failed. All other peripherals are working and the system is booting normal.

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  • chris-7 Feb 26, 2008

    Got a new Power Supply and System is stable again. Thanks a lot for proffesional support - that was great help.

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Your description indicates your power supply may be faulty or there is a break somewhere in the 24 pin main ATX cable wiring.
Swap out the power supply. Make sure your PSU has a 24 pin ATX connector & (not a 20) pin & a 4 pin ATX_12v connector for the CPU.

Posted on Feb 17, 2008

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No Video when the system is turned on


Doesn't quite work that way, and good job on capacitor replacement

!O_O!

What bites is sometimes the Electrolytic Paste dries up, and there is no visual signs of failure.

1) Think I better tell you about the motherboard voltage regulator circuit;

One of the things the motherboard voltage regulator circuit does, is to regulate voltage for the Processor. (CPU)

The Processor MUST have a steady, 'clean', supply of voltage; and it MUST be kept within the tight voltage tolerance range, specified for the Processor.

Cannot be too much, or too little; or BIOS turns it off.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

General thinking would be that the Capacitors that surround the Processor, are the only ones for it.
This is a fallacy.

There could a capacitor, or capacitors; that are in the motherboard voltage regulator circuit, and for the Processor; and are NO where near the Processor.

You actually have to follow the circuit traces, and see.
Example; Is there a capacitor over by the Ram Memory, or another outlying area, that a circuit trace from it leads to the processor socket?

Read the Hardwaresecrets article, and I believe it will help with understanding.

2) Don't know your soldering prowess, not knocking it.
You don't have any cold solder joints, do you?
That will make you pull your hair out, until you find it.

3) The Power Supply thing; the statement that it doesn't work that way;

You could have a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail.
LED's would light up, and fans may spin; but there isn't enough power to turn the Processor on.

1) If ALL of the LED's were lit up at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor (CPU) can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it is.

When testing; the Processor, processor fan and heatsink, plus ram memory is installed.

You are trying to get the BIOS Setup screen to come up.

Make SURE there is a stick of ram memory in Slot 1. (DIMM 1)
This is the ram memory slot that is closest to the Processor.
The Processor reads Slot 1 first.


Yes. If you have more than 1 ram memory module ('Stick'), trade them around/out, and see if you have a bad ram memory module.

Also suggest clean the gold plated contact pins, on the Ram Memory module; with a pencil eraser.
Use air to remove the eraser dust.

When diagnosing a desktop computer problem, POWER is ALWAYS checked first.
Then see if computer is dirty inside, and then clean ram memory module's, gold plated contact pins with pencil eraser.

If you are not following, or if the person before you was not following; Anti-Static Procedures, use the motherboards for a Frisbee, or expensive paperweight.

Regressing;
There are 3 main voltage power rails;
A) 3.3 Volts
B) 5 Volts
C) 12 Volts
ALL are DC Voltage

In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

A) ALL Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
B) ALL Red wires are 5 Volts
C) ALL Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

Voltage power rail.
ALL Orange wires are 3.3 Volts, and they all end in one central point; inside the power supply; the 3.3 Volt power rail.

Same thing for Red 5 Volt wires, and Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Multimeter red probe lead (Positive) plugged into Red hole on multimeter, that has DCV next to it. DC Voltage.

Function knob set to DC Voltage (DCV)
If just a symbol, the symbol is a dotted line over a solid line.
(Curved line over solid line is ACV. AC Voltage)

If more than one scale, set to 0-50 volt scale, DCV.
0 to 50 volts Direct Current Voltage. (DC Voltage)

Positive (Red) probe lead of multimeter TO power wires.
3.3 Volt (Orange), 5 Volt (Red), 12 Volt (Yellow)

Negative (Black) probe lead of multimeter TO Ground wire.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.
Read multimeter.
(Power supply on)

You can purchase an economical multimeter, for as little as $5 to $12.
Auto parts stores have them. (A little more pricey usually)
I have seen them on checkout aisle racks, at major discount stores.

No?
Not feasible?
Is there a working computer you can TEMPORARILY, borrow it's Power Supply?
KNOWN to be working, and Compatible Power Supply?
Use for a test unit. See if the Power Supply is the problem.

Not to be a hater, but I would use SuperMicro motherboards; to skip across the lake with.

"Wow! Look at that baby go!"

But DON'T! It's bad on the environment.
(Fish get two heads, and stuff.


NO! Not really. You gonna' believe that? lol!

It IS bad for the environment, however)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply#Wiring_diagrams

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Mar 18, 2013 | SuperMicro P8SCT Motherboard

1 Answer

Monitor shows no signal when put on. i've checked the graphic card and it seems to have no problem. RAM and CMOS battery are all fine but data refuses to show on monitor. Please i'll need...


A) Power Supply:
Power Supply has a weak voltage power rail.

!O_O!

But the LED's light, and fans spin?

1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor (CPU) can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it is.

This is why the simpy little LED's can light, and fans spin; but Not enough power to turn the Processor on.

There are 3 voltage power rails;
A) 3.3 Volt
B) 5 Volt
C) 12 Volt
ALL are DC Voltage.

[In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC ]

Do you have access to a multimeter to test them with?
Around here an economical multimeter is $5 to $12.
Available at auto parts stores, (A wee more expensive)
I have also seen them on checkout aisle racks, at major discount stores.

I can guide you step by step.

OR,
Do you have a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; that you can use for a temporary test unit?

B) Electrolytic Capacitors:
Specifically - Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors.

Some motherboards use nothing but those.
Newer motherboards went to using those, plus Solid Polymer Capacitors.
Finally, most new motherboards that are gamer style, use nothing BUT Solid Polymer Capacitors.
(Or whatever the new solid capacitor used is)

http://capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lut7MX5Dd_A

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague

C) Next,.........
The front of your computer is the Front Panel.
Disconnect all cables going to the Front Panel, for the USB ports, Firewire ports (1394/1394a), and Card Reader cables.

DO NOT disconnect the cable/wires from the Front Panel header, on the motherboard.

[The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the Main wires go to, is the Front Panel header.

The main wires are the Power On switch, Power On LED light, HarDDrive activity LED light, and Reset switch, IF used ]

Still no?

Disconnect the Harddrive cable from the motherboard, (Data cable), and the power cable to Harddrive.
Do the same for the optical drive. (CD/DVD drive)

ONLY things to be connected is the;
1) Processor
2) Heatsink
3) Processor Fan
4) Ram Memory

Graphics card, IF it is the only graphics solution.
Otherwise, plug the monitor into the Integrated Graphics of the motherboard.

[Back of computer in the I/O area. The I/O area has a rectangular sheet metal, I/O Shield around it.

Input/Output area.
Input: Mouse, Keyboard, etc.
Output: Monitor, Printer, etc ]

NO cables from motherboard connected to Anything, except Processor Fan, and Front Panel header.

Does the BIOS Setup screen show, when you press the enter BIOS Setup key?

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 26, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

D945gccr MB NO DISPLAY I GUESS ITS BIOS PROBLEM


Maltesh,

1) IF ALL of the LED (Lights) were on they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.

Intel D945GCCR motherboard?
Can use up to an Intel Core2 Duo E4700, (800MHz FSB), according to Intel Support,

http://processormatch.intel.com/CompDB/SearchResult.aspx?Boardname=d945gccr

An Intel Core2 Duo E4700 can use up to 65 Watts,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Core_2_microprocessors#.22Allendale.22.2C_.22Conroe.22_.2865_nm.29

Check the Power Supply.
A Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, will have plenty of power to light LED's, and maybe spin fans, but Not enough power to turn the Processor on.

No processor, no computer.
The computer isn't generating a video signal.
No Signal to the monitor.

Do you have access to a multimeter, or DC Volt meter?
Test the three Low DC voltages coming out of the Power Supply.
A) 3.3 Volt power rail
B) 5 Volt power rail
C) 12 Volt power rail (ALL are DC voltage)

[ In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries store 3 Volts DC ]

Need guidance with testing post back in a Comment.

Or if you have a KNOWN to be good, and Compatible power supply, that you can borrow for a test, try it.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Aug 14, 2012 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Pisplay not shown


Display not shown?

1) Does the monitor show No Signal?
If so go on.

If not;

Use another known to be good monitor, and monitor cable, on your desktop computer. Be aware that the problem may be the monitor cable.

Or use your monitor cable, and monitor, on another KNOWN to be working computer.
The monitor isn't receiving a Video Signal. Means the signal is not reaching the monitor. Could just be a bad monitor cable.

2) If the monitor is good, and the monitor cable is good, the problem is the computer itself. The computer isn't working.

You may see LED lights light up, hear fans running, and maybe even the Harddrive spinning.

Problem could be the Power Supply.

A) IF, all of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

B) EACH fan only uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

C) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what Processor it is.
(Older Intel Pentium III processors, and AMD Athlon processors, use less power than 51 Watts)

Not enough power? BIOS will not turn the Processor on.

Solution is to test the Power Supply's 3 main voltage power rails, or use another KNOWN to be good, COMPATIBLE power supply, for a test unit.

The 3 main voltage power rails are;

A) 3.3 Volt power rail

B) 5 Volt power rail

C) 12 Volt power rail

Test is done with an economical Multimeter, set to DC Voltage.

Post the model number of the IBM Netvista desktop computer. You will find it on the back of the computer, next to the Windows product key,
(XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX), or up on the side of the computer tower.

Post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 20, 2012 | IBM NetVista PC Desktop

2 Answers

Pls help my computer shows no display


CPU fan runs, harddrive picks up, but no display.

1) Bad Power Supply
Or
2) Bad graphics chipset.

The two main factors for desktop computer failure, is a bad power supply, and/or the computer is dirty inside.

A) Bad Power Supply

Weak voltage power rail
Enough power to light LED lights, and perhaps spin fans, but not enough power to turn the Processor on.

IF all of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts

A typical Processor can use from 51 to 125 Watts.
Just depends on what Processor it is, as to what the maximum Wattage usage is.

CPU fan runs? Sure. It's only using 2 to 3 Watts.

Harddrive 'picks up'? You will hear the Spindle Motor spinning the Platters inside. Means nothing.

With no Processor running, BIOS can not hand the computer over to the Operating System. (WinXP is one example of an O/S)

There is nothing to find the Boot Record, on one of those Platters inside the harddrive.

(Explanation of physical construction of an average Harddrive,

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/hard-disk.htm )

You can check the Power Supply voltages out. See if there is a weak voltage power rail.

Power coming into the Power Supply is the dangerous voltage.
Power coming out of the Power Supply is not.

The Power Supply in your Personal Computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Your Power Supply converts the electricity from your home, or business, into three main voltages,

A) 3.3 Volts
B) 5 Volts
C) 12 Volts

All are DC voltage. (The incoming electricity from your home or business, is AC voltage)
{In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC}

Use a multimeter to test the voltages. If you do not have access to one, an economical multimeter can be purchased for around $8 to $12. A multitude of stores carry them. An auto parts store is but one example.
Analog or digital, it doesn't matter. (I prefer Analog)

Set the Function Knob to DC voltage. (If just a symbol is used it is a dotted line over a solid line)

If there is more than one setting for DC Voltage, set it to the 0 to 50 Volts scale. (0-50)

The red probe lead is the Positive lead.
The black probe lead is the Negative lead.

The Positive probe lead touches the power wire
The Negative probe lead touches a Ground wire.

The 3.3 Volt power rail, the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail, are the power wires.
Test one at a time.

ALL Black wires are GROUND wires.

Test at the ATX main power cable's connector.
The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard. The Power Supply is plugged into power.

The ATX main power cable used for a Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M motherboard,
is a 20-pin ATX main power cable. This is an example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Note the photo to the far right. The ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard.
Testing the voltages is done at the Back of the connector. Back of the ATX main power cable connector. The Back of the connector is where the wires go in.

The probe leads tips, will not fit down into the socket holes, next to the wires already present.
Suggest use an adapter. Suggested adapter is a paper clip.

The paper clip is straightened out, then inserted down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO THE WIRE that is already there.
The paper clip Must go down into the socket hole, to touch a metal terminal.

At the end of every wire going into the ATX main power cable connector, is a metal terminal. You have to go down past the insulation of the wire, and touch the metal terminal with the paper clip.

A) The Orange insulated wires are 3.3 Volts
B) The Red wires are 5 Volts
C) The Yellow wires are 12 Volts.

Example to test a 3.3 Volt power rail;

Power Supply unplugged from power insert a straightened out paper clip into a socket hole with an Orange wire. Leave it sticking up.

Now insert a straightened out paper clip, into ANY socket hole with a Black wire. (Ground)

Plug the Power Supply into power. Touch the red Positive probe lead of the multimeter, to the paper clip for the Orange wire. Hold it there.
Now touch the black Negative probe lead to the paper clip for the Ground wire.
(Black wire)

You should read VERY close to 3.3 Volts.

Same procedure for the 5 Volt power rail, and the 12 Volt power rail.

{Power Rail;
All 3.3 Volt (Orange wires), end at one central point in the Power Supply.
This central point is the 3.3 Volt power rail.
Same for the 5 Volt, and 12 Volt wires.

You can test any wire of that voltage, and be testing the entire power rail, for that voltage }

Power Supply checks out?
Graphics chipset.

Chp and Chipset are slang terms for I.C.
Integrated Circuit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_Circuit

The graphics chipset is a GPU.
Graphics Processing Unit,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPU

A GPU can be soldered directly to the motherboard, or to a removable card.

Soldered directly to the motherboard is Integrated Graphics.
Also known as OnBoard graphics. (ON the motherBOARD)

Soldered to a removable card is a Graphics Card.
(Full name is Graphics Adapter Card)

If you are using Integrated Graphics, try using a graphics card.
If the graphics card works, the problem is bad Integrated Graphics on the motherboard.
The graphics card bypasses using Integrated Graphics.

{The above is that you are seeing No Signal on the monitor.
If not check the monitor, AND the monitor cable to see if they are good. Test on a known to be good, working computer }

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 05, 2011 | Gigabyte GA-K8VM800M Motherboard

1 Answer

ECS RC410L/800-M (V2.0) motherboard won't boot up. lites the fans and system lights, but no go. replaced video, CPU with 800 fsb from 533 existing and cleared cmos, still nothing. 533 processor creates...


A bad Power Supply with a weak voltage rail, will produce the symptoms you've just described.

1) IF all of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use from 51 to 125 Watts.
Just depends on what Processor it is.

You press the Power On button. The first chipset (Integrated Circuit) to receive power is the BIOS chipset.
BIOS detects what devices are installed, does a Ram Memory count, turns the Processor on, and hands the computer over to the Operating System.
(Windows XP is one example of an O/S)

Have you tested the main voltages of the Power Supply?
A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail

(12 volt rail must be 11 volts or more. Less = new Power Supply)

Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 28, 2011 | EliteGroup RC410L/800-M (V2.0)...

1 Answer

167 bios


To troubleshoot processor issues, follow these steps and test the processor after performing each one:

Notes:
  • If either the system board or processor have been replaced, reflash the BIOS to the latest level before proceeding.

  • Some computers allow the fan to stop spinning. This is not a malfunction. The fan should start spinning as the system heats up.
  1. Ensure the latest BIOS code is installed. This will correct any 167 POST errors for the Intel microcode update and "176 No Processor CPUID" post errors.

  2. Reseat the processor and the heat sink

    Note: Do not touch either the processor or system board contacting surfaces. These can be extremely fragile and bent pin damage due to touching is not covered under warranty.

  3. Verify the processor fan operation is not blocked by cables or other hardware.

  4. Verify that any replacement processor is the correct architecture for the system.

May 25, 2011 | IBM NetVista PC Desktop

1 Answer

RE ASUS P5S800-VM Motherboard.. system will not power up.. processor heatsink fan does not power up ... but ... removing processor and pressing power switch fan does work.. what is the problem??


Bad Power Supply. Weak voltage power rail.

[There are three main power rails in the SMPS for your desktop computer.
A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail ]

1) ALL of the LED lights on at once use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it.

Remove the Processor, and you will have power to light LED lights, and spin fans.
Of course without a Processor operating, you have No computer.

Replace the Power Supply.

Do you have a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply available to use for a test unit?

Need guidance in replacing, or suggestions for Power Supply's to choose from, post In a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Dec 02, 2010 | ASUS P5S800-VM Motherboard

1 Answer

Dimension 3100 Won't POST, getting amber flashing amber light at front panel and on the mother board getting steady light near the cmos battery note under the light says cr3h1 re-seated cpu and cards,...


I concur with your diagnoses.

Weak power supply due to a weak, or failed, voltage power rail.

There are three main voltage power rails for your Dell Dimension 3100 power supply.

1.The 3.3 Volt rail
2.The 5 Volt rail
3.The 12 Volt rail

Newer computer power supply's are doing away with the 3.3 Volt rail.
Your power supply has,

16 Amps on the 3.3 Volt rail,
21 Amps on the 5 Volt rail, and
21 Amps on the 12 Volt rail.

These are the main power voltage rails.
Voltage times Amperage = Wattage.
You have a power supply, that is rated at a maximum output of 400 Watts.

1) ALL the lights use less than 1 Watt.
2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts
3) A typical processor uses 55 to 125 Watts.

(A typical Intel Pentium 4 HT processor, Model 640, (3.2GHz), uses a maximum of 84 Watts,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Pentium_4_microprocessors#Prescott_2M_.2890.C2.A0nm.29

With a weak, or failed voltage power rail you don't have enough power to turn on the processor.
No processor running there is nothing to run the operating system. (Windows XP is an example of an O/S)

The harddrive just sits there, and spins, or will spin a few times, and stop.

What causes this?
1) Cheap quality power supply, (SMPS), installed by computer manufacturer. Cheap components are used in the power supply. (Electrolytic Capacitors, gauge of wiring, rectifier bridge, and so on)

2) Inside of computer, and power supply hasn't been cleaned on a regular basis.
Causes havoc inside the computer.

The processor fan builds up with dust, dirt, hair, etc, and the cooling capacity drops tremendously. Eventually the processor turns off. (BIOS turns it off)
It's a Fail safe feature that is built-in, to keep the processor from burning up.

Before it get's to the stage of overheating, and turning off, it calls for more power from the power supply.
The power supply works overtime to keep up.

When the inside of a power supply, and it's cooling fan are clogged with the above mentioned gunk, the cooling capacity of the power supply also drops tremendously.

The heatsink's inside the power supply cannot get rid of the heat. The fins are clogged, and air cannot rush through them to disperse the heat.

When the blades of the fan, and it's center hub become clogged, the cooling capacity drops due to not enough air is passed.

Heat = Wasted Energy, and the power supply strains to keep up. Eventually components inside the power supply start to fail, or fail.
(Electrolytic Capacitors are usually the first to go. They are the weakest link)

Questions?

Dec 26, 2009 | Dell Dimension 3100 PC Desktop

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