Question about Harman Kardon AVR 630 Receiver

3 Answers

Internal cooling fan not working?

I have never seen my internal fan turn on. The heat sink gets up to 120 deg F and the fan still doesn't run. It is too hot to touch. What temp is the fan supposed to kick on at, and how can I replace the temp sensor?

Posted by on

3 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

Theif,

I concur with Robo, 120 degrees is normal and nothing to worry about. I have a Harman AVR-245 that idles at 118 deg and peaks around 122 in a room with ambient temperature of 70 on a Sanus open-air stand. My Yamaha RX-1700 idles at 124 and peaks around 130.

This is not necessary but you can reposition the temp sensor in most Harman AVRs. By default the sensor is screwed into the aluminum heat sink on the back-right side near the illuminated volume control. If you look closely at the heat sink you should be able to spot another pre-drilled hole closer towards the power supply. The power supply is the main source of heat. This is where I attached the sensor.

After repositioning the sensor I have not noticed the fan come on. But with
Harman's build quality being suspect, having the sensor in a more appropriate place gives me piece of mind.




Posted on Mar 23, 2008

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

Hey guys!

I have the avr630 with JBL home theatre speakers..... its amazing what this amplifier can do.
Recently though when I use it for like 2 to 3 hours none stop it switch's off! :(
I sent to the workshop to see whats wrong but they say the amplifier is fine.
Please let me know wat u guys think and wat i should do!
thanks,

Nader
email me at: nader_mo1@hotmail.com

Posted on Nov 16, 2008

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 1,512 Answers

Hi Theif

Dont be too concerned, 120 deg f is not that hot for an output stage. hehehe we get air temps nearly that high here in Australia... you really DONT want the fan running all the time anyway, particularly when listening at lower levels, as you can hear it operating(they do annoy me at least). This is not the case when you have it CRANKED. By design, internal heatsinks can and do get VERY HOT, and fans are required to assist the cooling operation of the heatsink when needed. I would be concerned if it did not kick in by 180 deg f. Semiconductors in output stages have operating limits well beyond this.Hope this has reassured you.

regards
Graeme

Posted on Feb 17, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

UNIT KEEPS SHOWING "UNIT ABOUT TO TURN OFF OVER HEATING" I PULLED IT OUT DUSTED IT SAME MESSAGE. PULLED IT BACK OUT BLEW ON IT PUT IT BACK. WORKED FOR 15-20 MINUTES THEN MESSAGE CAME BACK.


Most of these devices have an internal cooling fan and/or heat sink that removes the excess heat from the circuitry; some have both. If the fan is not working or the heat sink clogged or has come dislodged from the power device(s), it can cause an overheat rapidly.

Feb 01, 2016 | Onkyo TX-SR607 Receiver

1 Answer

Cpu fan running at full speed


WARNING: Before you start troubleshooting remember that you are dealing with electricity that can KILL.

http://www.kitchentablecomputers.com/static.php - rules



Only work inside the computer case when the power has been switched off and disconnected. Never open the power source.



Some of the below steps recommend removing physical parts within the computer. While in the computer it is highly recommend that you be aware of ESD and its potential hazards

desktop or laptop computer fail to boot for a variety of reasons, but a fast, loud fan noise signifies that the system is suffering from overheating.


The problem, and the steps for troubleshooting it, is not unique to the Gateway Desktops.
When the internal temperature of the computer reaches too high a level, the system will shut down automatically to allow the heat to dissipate.


If you attempt to power up too soon, the machine will not boot properly.

To boot, you will need to correct the cause of the overheating, and keep the machine cool.


Blocked Vents


Although different in size, both desktop and laptop computers have air vents to help the fans keep air circulating around the hot internal components.


If these vents become blocked, by pushing a desktop too near a wall or using the laptop on a soft surface, the air supply your internal fans need to cool the system is cut off.


This blockage also traps the heat inside, allowing it to build to dangerous levels.

Keep the air vents on your computer free and clear to allow proper airflow.


Dirty Computer


Airborne particles, such as dust, lint and hair, can gather on the air vents and internal components over the course of time.


This accumulation of dirt not only provides a sort of "insulation" to the electronic components, preventing the heat they generate from dissipating normally, but it also clogs the fan and heat sink to prevent proper function.


Use canned air and damp, soft cloths to thoroughly remove any built-up debris from inside your computer.

Dried Thermal Paste


The heat sink sits atop the CPU chip to help dissipate the heat the component produces. Thermal paste is layered between the CPU and the heat sink to help draw the heat away from the chip for cooling.


Over time, the cooling properties of this paste decreases, and the substance becomes dry and flaky.

You can replace this paste to renew its cooling assistance by removing the old paste remnants with rubbing alcohol and adding a new layer.


Thermal paste is also known as thermal compound or thermal grease, and is available at most electronics stores.
Check you CPU central processing unit make sure its securely seated and has thermal paste it might be getting to hot the thermal paste will help disperse the heat

Thermal compound is a sticky paste that is placed directly onto the CPU.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Thermal-Compound-Roundup-February-2012/1490

Allowing for a more direct heat transfer between the CPU and HEAT SINK and preventing air gaps from forming between the CPU and heat sink.



Hot Environment


When examining overheating causes, don't overlook the environment you use your computer in.

External heat sources, such as fireplaces or even rays of direct sunlight, can cause the internal temperatures of your computer to rise.


This causes your internal fan to run harder in an attempt to dissipate the combined heat before temperatures rise too high.

Move your computer away from external heat sources to encourage more effective cooling.


Hope this helps.

Nov 28, 2012 | Gateway Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Cpu fan constantly running fast


An eMachines desktop or laptop computer fail to boot for a variety of reasons, but a fast, loud fan noise signifies that the system is suffering from overheating.


The problem, and the steps for troubleshooting it, is not unique to the eMachines brand. When the internal temperature of the computer reaches too high a level, the system will shut down automatically to allow the heat to dissipate.


If you attempt to power up too soon, the machine will not boot properly.

To boot, you will need to correct the cause of the overheating, and keep the machine cool.


Blocked Vents


Although different in size, both desktop and laptop computers have air vents to help the fans keep air circulating around the hot internal components.


If these vents become blocked, by pushing a desktop too near a wall or using the laptop on a soft surface, the air supply your internal fans need to cool the system is cut off.


This blockage also traps the heat inside, allowing it to build to dangerous levels.

Keep the air vents on your computer free and clear to allow proper airflow.


Dirty Computer


Airborne particles, such as dust, lint and hair, can gather on the air vents and internal components over the course of time.


This accumulation of dirt not only provides a sort of "insulation" to the electronic components, preventing the heat they generate from dissipating normally, but it also clogs the fan and heat sink to prevent proper function.


Use canned air and damp, soft cloths to thoroughly remove any built-up debris from inside your computer.

Dried Thermal Paste


The heat sink sits atop the CPU chip to help dissipate the heat the component produces. Thermal paste is layered between the CPU and the heat sink to help draw the heat away from the chip for cooling.


Over time, the cooling properties of this paste decreases, and the substance becomes dry and flaky.

You can replace this paste to renew its cooling assistance by removing the old paste remnants with rubbing alcohol and adding a new layer.


Thermal paste is also known as thermal compound or thermal grease, and is available at most electronics stores.


Hot Environment


When examining overheating causes, don't overlook the environment you use your computer in.

External heat sources, such as fireplaces or even rays of direct sunlight, can cause the internal temperatures of your computer to rise.


This causes your internal fan to run harder in an attempt to dissipate the combined heat before temperatures rise too high.

Move your computer away from external heat sources to encourage more effective cooling.


Hope this helps







Nov 11, 2012 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

Fan runs fast and no bootup


An eMachines desktop or laptop computer fail to boot for a variety of reasons, but a fast, loud fan noise signifies that the system is suffering from overheating.


The problem, and the steps for troubleshooting it, is not unique to the eMachines brand.
When the internal temperature of the computer reaches too high a level, the system will shut down automatically to allow the heat to dissipate.


If you attempt to power up too soon, the machine will not boot properly.

To boot, you will need to correct the cause of the overheating, and keep the machine cool.


Blocked Vents


Although different in size, both desktop and laptop computers have air vents to help the fans keep air circulating around the hot internal components.


If these vents become blocked, by pushing a desktop too near a wall or using the laptop on a soft surface, the air supply your internal fans need to cool the system is cut off.


This blockage also traps the heat inside, allowing it to build to dangerous levels.

Keep the air vents on your computer free and clear to allow proper airflow.


Dirty Computer


Airborne particles, such as dust, lint and hair, can gather on the air vents and internal components over the course of time.


This accumulation of dirt not only provides a sort of "insulation" to the electronic components, preventing the heat they generate from dissipating normally, but it also clogs the fan and heat sink to prevent proper function.


Use canned air and damp, soft cloths to thoroughly remove any built-up debris from inside your computer.

Dried Thermal Paste


The heat sink sits atop the CPU chip to help dissipate the heat the component produces.
Thermal paste is layered between the CPU and the heat sink to help draw the heat away from the chip for cooling.


Over time, the cooling properties of this paste decreases, and the substance becomes dry and flaky.

You can replace this paste to renew its cooling assistance by removing the old paste remnants with rubbing alcohol and adding a new layer.


Thermal paste is also known as thermal compound or thermal grease, and is available at most electronics stores.


Hot Environment


When examining overheating causes, don't overlook the environment you use your computer in.

External heat sources, such as fireplaces or even rays of direct sunlight, can cause the internal temperatures of your computer to rise.


This causes your internal fan to run harder in an attempt to dissipate the combined heat before temperatures rise too high.

Move your computer away from external heat sources to encourage more effective cooling.







Nov 07, 2012 | E-Machines W3107 (RBW3107) PC Desktop

2 Answers

Hi, My three year old DV8396EA is overheating within minutes of boot; the rather noisy fan starting almost immediately. Core Temp meter, which previously gave readings of about 50 to 60 degs, now reads...


You are receiving temperatures that would be considered dangerously high for the internal components of your laptop. What i would suggest doing is opening up your laptop, if you are comfortable doing so, and inspecting the heatsinks, fans, along the chassis of the laptop, under the keyboard, and anywhere that there may be dust. Clean off all the dust with a good spay with a can of compressed air and try again. If your temps are still that high I would suggest redoing the thermal paste under the heatsinks in your laptop. Not having a good application at the factory can cause issues later on down the line. I use artic silver for my thermal paste. All you have to do is follow all the instructions that come with the paste and it should be alright. If you do not see your temps go down after that, I would suggest taking your laptop in for service as there could be a potential of damaging your internal components.

Aug 19, 2011 | HEWLETT-PACKARD Pavilion DV8396EA Laptop...

1 Answer

Cpu fain over temperature plz ans me i wait your ans


Usually an overheating CPU is a result of bad or insufficient CPU grease.

If it is a desktop:
- Unplug
- Remove case cover
- Replug, BRIEFLY turn on to make sure CPU FAN is working properly
- IF FAN DOESN'T WORK:
- Replace fan!
- IF FAN DOES WORK:
- Unplug fan power cord
- Remove heat sink and clean with compressed air
- Carefully remove CPU from socket after releasing it via hinge mechanism
- Using rubbing alcohol and cotton or lint free cloth, clean cpu and bottom of heat sink of old grease
- TO APPLY NEW GREASE (purchase from anywhere):
- USE SMALL AMOUNTS! One of the big mistakes with applying is the tendency to put too much
- I'd suggest 3 to 4 dabs, no more than 3 to 4 millimeters in diameter
- Replace heat sink
- Use a program such as CPUID HWmonitor (freeware) to monitor temperature. It should hover in the 60 centigrade. If constantly above 74 then you may need to reapply grease.

If it is a laptop:

You can use most of the steps above but getting to the heat-sink will be tricky as the proprietary design of every make and model makes it difficult to access internal parts. I'd suggest taking it in!

Jul 05, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

My nc6000 starts automatically then shuts down and fan stops afterwards... pls... help


Hi,
You may want to try to plug it in a power outlet and see if you get the same outcome. If no then the battery might be causing the issue and you'll have to replace it. If yes, then there could be a problem with the laptop's internal power supply. If it turns off with the power light on, it may be a loose hardware, the RAM, Processor and/ internal cables might need reseating. If this still doesn't work, then try removing the CMOS, clean it then put it back after minute.
:-)

Jun 11, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Hi! I have Asus m2n-vm hdmi motherboard, about month ago i've got problem: if computer works more than 12 hours, it freezes and works normally just after few hours "rest". Also, after shutdown...


Hi lvadim1993,
In other word your PC works intermittently. Here is what you have to do. Check and remove the processor cooling fan and heat sink clean the cooling fan and heat sink. If you have a thermal compound remove the old thermal compound and put a little amount at the center of the heat sink. Reinstall it back the processor cooling fan and heat sink and make sure It install properly even and snag tight. re plug in the cooling fan connector to the motherboard. If you have a video card remove and clean the video card connector and the cooling fan and heat sink with air blower same also to the memory card. Use the air blower to clean the motherboard and the entire internal of the PC. Reinstall the video card and the memory card and make sure that they are install properly. replug in the video cable and the pc power cord and turn on the PC. this will work. the computer is just over heating. I hope that this information will help you solve the problem.
HRH

Jan 05, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have a Toshiba Satellite A215 and it keeps shutting down and getting hot. I don't think the internal fan is working. Can this be fixed and is it expensive?


Replacing the fan on the CPU or the GPU, Graphics card, is actually very simple and the fan will run about $20 to $25 depending on what type of fan you get and where. Aside from a new fan you will need a small tube of heat sink compound. The fan just clips on to the CPU. Make sure you get a fan that is designed for your CPU type or it will not fit properly. For instance, if you have a P-3 CPU you can't fit it with a P-2 Chip or P-4 chip, they won't mount correctly and subsequently they won't work. When you go to Best Buy or the computer shop your to buy your part tell them what type of CPU you have and that you want the cooling fan and the heat Sink Compound to mount it with. They will be able to direct you to the proper fan Type. Also, while you have it opened up take the opportunity to use canned Air to blow the dust out of the machine. If you are doing what is called Over Clocking it is important that you know you may have burned the CPU out as this causes the CPU to heat up more than it would if you just had it installed for the proper speed. The old fan will be difficult to remove because the old heat sink compound will have formed a bond between the fan heat sink and the CPU itself. If you have to do any prying to remove the old fan make sure you do so carefully and make sure you clean the old heat sink compound off the CPU before you try mounting the new fan. When you apply the new Heat sink compound you want to place the compound in the center of the CPU and let the heat sink spread the compound out in a thin layer. This compound needs to be spread evenly so it forms a good bond between the Heat sink and the CPU itself to properly transfer the heat from the CPU to the heat sink so the fan can properly cool the CPU.

Nov 21, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Compressor runs, very little cooling, internal fan not running


You will need to unplug refrigerator and open plane inside freezer to see if fan is stuck or burned out. If freezer is frozen over with ice you will need to warm the ice for removal. Let me know, when you are ready, Sea Breeze

Mar 22, 2009 | KitchenAid KTRP22EK Top Freezer...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Harman Kardon AVR 630 Receiver Logo

485 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Harman Kardon Audio Players & Recorders Experts

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

Carlos L. Burgos
Carlos L. Burgos

Level 2 Expert

618 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

72670 Answers

Are you a Harman Kardon Audio Player and Recorder Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...