Question about Cameras

1 Answer

This is a mind bender, While doing a shoot using monolights connected to a Nikon D1x I encountered exposure problems. After the lights were metered for the best exposure, I started shooting. The first ten or so shots were fine, and all of a sudden the next ten shots looked like they were 8 stops over, and then it went to looking ok. The first thing I did was switch monolights thinking there was a problem with the flash, this did not resolve the issue. Next I switched camera bodies, still the intermittent overexposure persist. And the 1-800 to Nikon tech support rendered no soloutions either. Can one of you Brainiac's solve this puzzle. One other thing, when I switched strobes I also changed sync cords. I'm open to any wisdom you may share in this annoying problem Thanx in advance

Posted by on

  • Kevin Pettit
    Kevin Pettit May 11, 2010

    Did you use the same lens with both camera bodies?

×

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

I have had this problem before in the past. In my case, it was the lens. The aperture was sticking open intermittently. It would show the correct fstop on the camera display but it was actually stuck wide open within the lens. Check your lens out or test this with a different lens and I think that will take care of your problem.

Posted on Jun 13, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

85mm 1.4 is not metering exposure on my nikon d7000


It is a manual focus lens. That is for sure. The D7000 only can meter, when a lens is fitted with a chip. Usually the Nikon AF lenses. (other brands like Sigma that are compatible) To my knowledge the Vivitar is not. You only can use this lens in Aperture-priority and manual exposure. See a discussion on Nikon forum about this lens, that is capable of shooting brilliant pictures.
Link to Nikon cafe forum about Vivitar 85 mm

Aug 29, 2013 | Vivitar Cameras

1 Answer

How to connect the rokinon lens mirror len 800mm to a Nikon d3100 camera


The lens lacks the electronics to communicate with the camera. You must shoot in manual mode (turn the mode dial to M). You'll have to set the aperture and shutter speed without any assistance from the camera's light meter. You can review the photo and use the histogram to adjust the exposure.

Oct 16, 2012 | Rokinon 800mm f/8.0 Multi-Coated Mirror...

1 Answer

I have a Nikon FM film camera. The viewfinder has three exposure indicators visible within the viewfield: + for overexposure, O for correct exposure and - for underexposure. These indicators have...


If the red light is steady on the minus sign even if you vary shutter and aperture settings and point the camera at different light exposures, then this is a metering problem. If the red light on the minus sign turns off when you have correct or over exposure, then it would mean your indicator lights for o and + are busted. Have your metering checked by a competent camera technician. In any case, since your camera is fully manual, you can use the 'sunny 16' rule and still shoot away.

Feb 26, 2011 | Nikon Photography

1 Answer

I cant get corect skin colour tone in auto white balance.i got some photographs and i see exif data of that photos in photoshop.at the exposure mode it showing manual exposure but at the scene cature type...


You can't. The Portrait mode, like all the other point&shoot modes, are automatic. The camera controls most functions, like exposure metering, auto-focus mode, and white-balance. If you want control over the camera, you'll have to use one of the PSAM modes.

Aug 23, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Problems taking pictures on nikon d1x


There may be something wrong with the camera. Make sure it is set to Single Exposure setting and not Multiples. There should be a control on the top left to change this. Look for an "S". this is what you want. If that doesnt help, you may need to get it repaired.

Mar 01, 2009 | Nikon D1X Digital Camera

1 Answer

When shooting indoors with my 300d (base rebel digital),I have been encountering some light metering problems.I use the 430ex as an external flash. While shooting a subject in front of an external light...


Set the metering mode to Partial Metering. This uses only 9% of the field of view, centered around the middle square in the viewfinder, as the subject area. If you still find it too bright, try changing the exposure compensation a couple of clicks.

Jul 28, 2008 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Washed out pictures


I would check to see if you have set the exposure compensation and/or flash compensation to a high setting and forgot to put it back to zero.
Good luck.

Dec 04, 2007 | Nikon D1X Digital Camera

3 Answers

Nikon d100


Wow, that's a long lens! It it a Nikon 500mm?

I use the full manual mode on my D70 sometimes, and I think the operation will be very similar. Spin the mode dial to M, first.

Now half-press the shutter and you should get metering at the bottom of the viewfinder. The meter will tell you if your current settings are over or underexposing. You can use the front control wheel to set the shutter time, and the back (thumb) control wheel to set the aperture.

If you've used S or A modes before, you'll be familiar with these controls. More aperture (smaller F numbers) lets in more light, as does (obviously) increasing the shutter exposure. If not, play around and watch what happens to your exposure meter in the viewfinder as you dial aperture and shutter duration up and down.

You're going to want a sturdy tripod or some very bright light with a lens that long!

You may have to use manual focus, too, if your lens does not have modern Nikon guts for the camera to talk to. I guess you'll cross that bridge when you come to it. Good luck!

Nov 05, 2007 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

53 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76848 Answers

Are you a Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...