Question about Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 Lens

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Auto focus My shot is composed and I half-depress the shutter release and the lens focuses on what I want, then, before I can take the shot, the lens has focused again (usually blurring what I wanted it to focus on). All the time the Ultra Sonic motor is humming. Help!

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Hi Wendy,

You mostly have the camera set into shooting mode "C" instead "S".

Some of those Canon cameras may say, "Single Servo Autofocus" and "Continuous Servo Autofucus".

Set to "S" as in single.

For more help: atdlee@netzero.com

Posted on Feb 15, 2008

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My Nikon Nikkor 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S for Digital SLR lens does not seem to auto focus well. Sometimes the lens will focus and unfocus and refocus constinely. Is this normal??


You did not say which camera body you are using, but you probably have three different auto-focus modes on you camera. You might be using the wrong one.

The modes are as follows:
AF-A Mode: Camera automatically selects single-servo autofocus when AF-A subject is stationary, continuous-servo autofocus when subject is moving. Shutter can only be released if camera is able to focus. AF-S Mode: For stationary subjects. Focus locks when shutter-release button AF-S is pressed halfway. Shutter can only be released when in-focus indicator is displayed.
AF-C Mode: For moving subjects. Camera focuses continuously while AF-C shutter-release button is pressed halfway. Photographs can be taken even when in-focus indicator is not displayed.

Dec 19, 2012 | Nikon Nikkor 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF...

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The camera will not fire the shutter when I use my 17-85 lens on AUTO FOCUS. It will not let me manually focus as well. what can I do.


1. First of all, make sure the lens is aligned properly and it's not loose in any way. The camera will immediately recognize the problem and will not let you fire the shutter.

2. Allow your lens to auto focus on an object (preferably something that's on your wall). See if it detects the object when you half press the shutter, and once it does press it down all the way.

3. If this is still not the case, the lens itself may be causing the problem. Make sure your camera is compatible with the lens (though most Canon lens are compatible with the EF-S series, it's still wise to check in Canon.com)

Jun 18, 2011 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

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Unsharp pictures when using the leica macro 90mm 4:0 lens as a telephoto lens


Besides any problems with the focus mechanism which should be fairly obvious, your shutter speed may be too slow. A slow shutter speed can be set manually or caused automatically when using a smaller aperture in lower light settings, the camera compensates by opening up the shutter. Try testing your lens out in bright scenes with the aperture open. Another problem is with manual lenses at low apertures. It can be difficult to manually focus at just the right point because shooting around f.4 with a longer barrel lens leads to a very shallow depth of field. To compensate, try a smaller aperture or take a few photos of a subject while adjusting your focus to get the "money shot." If all the above fails make sure to double check your sensor and lens are clean, a greasy or dirty lens will always lead to less crisp photos.

Feb 26, 2011 | Leica 90mm f/4 Macro-Elmar M Manual Focus...

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For use on a non-Hasselblad camera, can I use the aperture preview button (which locks) to set aperture?


There is no communications between the camera and lens. When using a set up like this everything becomes manual and you must remember to stop down the aperture to your taking aperture before releasing the shutter. I don't know what camera or format you are going to use this lens with but assuming it is a digital "bridge" (a camera that is between an amateur and a pro) or a professional the sequence would be the same.
To view, focus and compose the lens would be set in this case F2, to select the correct light meter reading the lens is set (stopped) down to the taking aperture. The modes I've used for this have been mostly manual but lately I found that "AV" worked equally well and the camera metered to the proper exposure. Most times the camera was mounted on a tripod and the shutter was released with a electronic shutter release.
Sequence for taking a photo for me anyway was/is (with the camera mounted on a tripod) focus, compose, stop down to taking aperture, check metering and release the shutter if in AV mode or manual mode to set the shutter speed and release the shutter.
You will find that all makes of digital cameras will function differently so what sequence works for one won't work on others. This meaning I have had digital cameras that wouldn't meter through anything other then the lenses meant specifically for them.
Problems that I've had. Forgetting to stop down to taking aperture (like Duh), not fine focusing (manual), not trusting the in focus indicator, forgetting that the viewfinder is/was only 94% of the scene. Once a little time has been spent with a lens set up like this the rewards are far beyond the trivial annoyances. Have fun with it

Jan 12, 2011 | Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

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When I press the shutter the lense cycles between two focus ranges, neither of which are in focus. It continues to do this as long as the shutter butten is depressed half way. It has worked fine for 4...


Your flex cable to the Iris is broken. Have a look at my gallery at http://www.pbase.com/barry_2718/efs1785mm I have the same symptoms. At 28 or 35mm it make work ok. try Av mode and f8 aperture to see if you get an err01 because the aperture does not move either.

Apr 18, 2010 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

I own a Canon 100 - 400 mm IS and mostlyl use it for bird photography. My problem is that the focusing of the lens is not very consistent. For example, when I was shooting a great egret somewhere between...


Which camera body do you own? It is the camera that determines where to focus and when you are in focus or not. I have 3 Canon film bodies and two digital. On all, the camera can be set to detect focus using all or a specific focus point visible in your viewfinder. Check how you have the camera set and choose ONE focus point. place this focus point on your most critical item in the image, in the case of your birds, the HEAD of the bird, press your shutter button half way to lock exposure and focus, then shift the aim to compose your image before pressing the rest of the way to make the exposure.

For birds, on my digital cameras, I choose to go into live preview mode, zoom in to 10x magnification and manually focus. This eliminates the camera not knowing what I want in focus.

try using a tripod to steady the shot, and do not forget that Canon states you should turn off the IS when the lens is used in conjunction with a tripod. From firsthand experience, I agree with this instruction, often when stable on a tripod, the IS can actually be trying to correct for its own movement and cause a degradation in image focus.

Good luck

Jan 02, 2010 | Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

Blurred Images with Olympus E520


When operating any digital camera, the camera tries to capture the best focus and exposure for that particular scene. By pressing the shutter button half-way down, the focus and exposure is being set. There will be a green circle on the upper left hand corner of the screen, then your camera is ready to take the picture. Slowly depress the shutter the rest of the way down to take the picture.

Mar 23, 2009 | Olympus Zuiko 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Digital ED...

1 Answer

Problem with lens


if you cant afford it read this,
The reason for this is that I find it easiest to track a moving subject if it's in the middle of the viewfinder. Cameras cannot know what you want to focus on, and if you start using multiple AF points, how is the camera supposed to know that you want to focus on the bird and not the tree - cameras are lacking in human thought processes! What is quite handy though is using the AI SERVO FOCUS or AI FOCUS settings so that the lens will alter it's focus on the subject over which the centre AF point is aligned as it moves towards you or further away from you. Without this, the focus will fix at the point you half depress shutter and if the subject comes closer or goes further away then it will be out of focus. you can call any expert of lences also for it if you can afford.

May 22, 2008 | Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di Zoom Lens for...

1 Answer

Slight blur shooting variety of subjects


It is just a possibility but you may have overrode the auto focus. If you accidentally move the focussing ring it disables the auto focus.

Mar 17, 2008 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

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