Question about Audio & Video Receivers

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Teac rw-cd22 burning problem

I am coming in on line in rca's ( on a teac rwcd22 cd recorder) and am recieving signal when i select the analog input selector but when i try to hit record the player reads "no cd - da:d2" i have switched the type of cd and am pretty sure that the solution isnt in the cd but something to do with dubbing mode. please help me I am not incompetent with audio equipment and am pretty frustrated as to why this isnt working!!

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  • Chad
    Chad Feb 14, 2008

    Yeah like i said it isnt the cd but rather something internal with the dubbing mode

  • Chad
    Chad Feb 14, 2008

    So Like i said im coming in the line in, want to record the music coming in on that line in, I select analog on the input selecter and recieve signal, I go to record and it reads NOCD - DA : D2, I believe the no cd represent the first disc tray but then the second tray, the dubbing tray, is reading DA : D2, this has nothing to do with the CD type, so if you could ponder over my problem again schrody I would appreciate it, also the burner works fine record from the first disc tray to the dubbing tray so Im pretty much at a loss for words as to what the f**k is wrong with this thing.

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You were right! I changed the cd and it does not do DA:D2

Posted on Mar 14, 2009

  • djdrewp Nov 30, 2010

    What name brands of audio or music only blank cd's work??? TDK, Memorex, Sony, Verbratim, Pengo don't work... I get DA:D2

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Are you using a MUSIC CD-R or CD-RW? You cannot use regualr computer CDR or RW discs in a standalone audio recorder. You must use special blank discs which are specifically designated as for "Music" or "audo". THey have a special code on them that indicates such, and usually cost a bit more than computer discs because an extra tax goes to the recording industry..

Posted on Feb 14, 2008

  • Bruce Stelly
    Bruce Stelly Jun 21, 2011

    Use a Cd-R Music audio by Sony or TDK. push sync all, then it will record your Cd. Unfortunately i am trying to figure out the record input sound because with analog I am good but with digital and coaxial ther is a sound lowering problem.

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1 Answer

I have a LG47" tv


Your DVD audio is sent directly to your receiver - not to you TV. That's why you can hear the audio on your stereo. The TV audio is not being sent anywhere - it is "stuck" in the TV and is amplified and sent to the TV speakers. Since the TV speakers are off, you don't hear anything. In order to listen to the TV audio on the stereo system's speakers, you need to send it to the receiver.

You need to have a pair (left + right signals) of audio cables (assuming you wish to listen to stereo sound) from the TV's Audio Output jacks to a pair of Audio Input jacks on the receiver / amplifier. You can use any unused input - CD, Video, Tape, Sat, etc. If you use Tape or Sat audio inputs, when you wish to listen to the TV audio, you must select the Tape or Sat input on the receiver.

Do not send more than one signal to a set of inputs on the receiver. Typically, a CD, DVD and Sat inputs offer two or more of the following types 1) Analog audio. These are the older RCA jacks that have been around since the beginning and require separate cables for left and right channels. 2) Optical inputs. This is the newer digital interface that provides for Dolby Digital (and others) format sound over a single fiber optic cable. 3) Coaxial inputs. This jacks looks like an RCA jack, but usually has an Orange ring - instead of the Red & White rings that analog RCA jacks have. They use a single coaxial cable. 4) HDMI input. This jacks carries both digital video and digital audio signals. If you are using an Optical input for the DVD on the receiver, do not use any other unused analog or digital inputs associated with the DVD to "piggyback" another device like a CD , VHS tape, etc.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thank you.

Mar 25, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

4 Answers

How do I hook up my ipod to my pioneer vsx d409 ?


The best way is to use a 3,5mm stereo jack to 2 RCA cable like this:
technical114_34.jpg
You can easily find one like this at your local audio/electronics shop or buy one on line. You have to connect the RCA at any free stereo input at the back of your Pioneer (like aux or cd). Take a look at this picture:
technical114_35.jpg
After this you can use the 3.5mm stereo jack for connecting not only your ipod but every mp3 player or other device has an earphone jack. Just plug the 3.5mm jack at the earphone jack and rise the volume at the portable device up to the middle of the volume range and set your Pioneer input selector at the stereo input that you connect the 2 RCA before (aux or cd)

In case of a problem or clarification or further details needed, don't hesitate to post me a reply before rejecting my answer.
If you are satisfied, rate my solution with the "thumbs" or (even better) add a testimonial.

Thanks and regards
Please kindly rate this solution
Stelios
direct fixya link: http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

Mar 13, 2011 | Pioneer VSX-D409

1 Answer

How do I link my technics ge 70 graphic equaliser to my technics cd player sl-pd7a and my technics md player sj-md100 with phono rca leads . Thank you Simon


It would help to know what other electronics (receiver, maybe?) is involved.

If neither of those devices is a recorder, why do you need to connect them to the EQ when your receiver/preamp may have the facilities to connect the two playback devices directly; and the EQ in a Tape Loop?

Scenario A)

Assuming you REALLY want to have the CD and MD input through the EQ because you can't attach them any other way...

CD audio OUT to Line In; MD audio OUT to Playback;

EQ LINE OUT to whatever analog electronic inout you have in mind.

To hear and Equalize the CD set the Input Selector to Source, EQ REC button OFF; to hear the MD equalized set the Input Selector to Tape, EQ REC button OFF.

====

Scenario B:

You have a receiver with only ONE Line Level Aux input and a Tape Loop.

Insert the EQ in the Tape Loop. Attach one of the disc players to AUX and the other to the TAPE conenctions on the EQ.

====

Scenario C

You have a Home Theater System or Audio Vido Reciever.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 01, 2011 | Technics Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Is there an RCA input on the MCDX32i? The specs say there is but I am unable to find it. I need to to hook up a newly acquired record player. Anyone help?


Do you mean the TEAC MCDX32i ???

The little 1/8" Aux In is what you're looking for. You can connect an iPod-like device to it or any other audio device that has RCA-style analog stereo outputs if you just get an adapter at Rado Shack.

If your new record player doesn't include an onboard phono preamp it won't work with this unit.

Dec 28, 2010 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I am trying to hook up my Pioneer vsx-455 to a LG LED LCD TV. I am not sure on how to do this and I can not find a manual anywhere. Can you help me?


your reciever does not have hdmi, so the audio is not going to be true DD+ or DTS for broadcast tv.

if your dvd/blue ray player has digital optical spdif, this can be used to transfer the encoded DD+/DTS digital audio.

the besat way to run your tv audio through the reciever is to hook up the dvd/blue ray player up with (perferrably) digital optical spdif, composite spdif or (least favorably) through the stereo stereo analog inputs on the reciever for "dvd" audio in and hook the video from the dvd/blue ray up to the corresponding "dvd" video component input on the reciever.

this way is only going to get your dvd/blue ray sound, next you need to hook up your cable box to the reciever so that you can get broadcast tv sound. hook up the cable box audio to the "tv" stereo analog audio ins, and hook the video to the corresponding "tv" video component inputs.

the component video inputs have separate jacks for red, green and blue ( labeled "Y" "Pb" and "Pr") and are capable of carrying a 1080p full hd signal. use the component video outputs on the reciever to output the video signal to a component video input on the tv, using the receiver's input selector to change the video source.

Nov 25, 2010 | Pioneer VSX-455 Receiver

1 Answer

I have a tx-sv454 reciever and i need to know how to hookup my pioneer dynamic expander ex-9000 and a pioneer dynamic processor rg-60 and my cd player all together


I can't find an image of the rear panel but I have a low-rez manual for the TX-SV434, which should be pretty close. I can't make out the labeling on the RCA connections.

Let's simplify this. The CD just goes into the CD input.

You can either use the two (if present) Tape or Video In/Out loops for the individual processors, or you can run them in series with each other on one Tape Loop.

I don't imagine you really want to use both Dynaic Range processors together, so each one's Bypass function would take it out of the path if so desired.

The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.
[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Aug 08, 2010 | Onkyo TX-SV454 Receiver

1 Answer

Can't record out from a digital input


It only passes the signal it see's. Digital for Digital and Analog for Analog. Try running a Standard analog RCA from your Cable box to the receiver then try and record. Hope this helps. If you still have an issue, post a comment and I can help you further.

Sep 18, 2009 | Denon AVR-3803 Receiver

1 Answer

Connect Airport Express to Yamaha RX- V659


Since you're using a standard mini jack to double RCA cable, it's safe to assume you'll be sending line level signal into your reciever, so i think any of these audio inputs will do: AUX, CD, DVD, MD, TV.

Also try the inputs on the front of the unit (i guess they are meant to be used with a video camera or similar but they are designed for line level signals so it should be ok if you decide to use them).

Anyway, keep the source signal at a moderate
level when you test any of the inputs and raise it to a suitable level after you're sure it is coming thru well.

Normally, the AUX input is suitable for any AUXilliary signal source that puts out a line level signal, but if it is already being used, you may use other free inputs.

If you use TAPE or PHONO inputs, you should keep the signal level from the source a bit lower since these inputs will amplify the signal a bit more (especially the phono input which works with signals that are lower in level than the line signal).

I hope this helps.

Regards

3rq8 (Triarcuate)

Sep 06, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V659 Receiver

2 Answers

RCA STAV-3880 RECIEVER FOR CHEAP. I DOES NOT RECOGNIZE DIGITAL


I have found that on some units you unfortunately need the remote for more advanced settings. Sorry man.

Aug 01, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

In line eq


The EQ is probably 2-channel so maybe we need to consider what you COULD accomplish with it even if you could use it. Whatever it does to the analog source material will affect all of your speakers if you use simulated surround modes. BTW, I use an old analog EQ myself but not for room correction purposes, mostly for recording. My receiver has an single explicit Tape Mon function through which I have a dbx 224x Program Route Selector and a mess of analog sound processing devices plus a CD-R but using just the one Monitor. I'd still go ahead if I were you.

Of your MD/Tape; CD-R; VCR 1 or 2 connectors, I would think one of them would probably funtion mostly like a Tape Mon as you understand it.

The manual leads me to advise that you DO NOT connect anything digital to the Digital Inputs that correspond to your chosen EQ loop. It's due to some automation that prefers a digital signal over an analog one. Should you be taping something and suddenly turn on any digital input corresponding to your analog one the unit would probably switch sources on you.

I think you understand what Tape Mon is all and how it should act so I'd say try the various analog inputs that have INs & OUTs to see how they work. I'd tune an FM station and hook up the EQ then and see if selecting its function kills the FM audio. I'm really surprised the manual doesn't discuss Monitoring a recording.

Page 12 in the manual has a number of warnings regarding keeping things turned ON if you use these connectors for recording.

Good luck.

Apr 06, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V800 Receiver

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