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Need infor. on floppy disk

I need to know if there is a 3.5" floppy diskette that has more than 1.44.
I need this to use on our keyboard at our church.

thanks in advance

billy

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3.5" typical Floppy Drive will support floppies only upto 1.44 MB. However, you can get 2.88 Floppy Drive in 3.5".

Ebay lists the item on the following link :

http://search.ebay.com/2-88-floppy-drive_W0QQfkrZ1QQfnuZ1QQsatitleZ2Q2e88Q20floppyQ20drive

Please check if it suits your requirement.

Best of luck,
rajesh_im

Posted on Feb 13, 2008

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